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What day is may 1st on


what day is may 1st on

May 1st is a much, much older holiday than Labo(u)r day. It is a pagan spring, or fertility, festival whose origins go back into the mists of history. May 1 significant news events for this day include Hindenberg Becomes German President, Citizen Kane Opens in Theaters, Castro Bans Cuban. May 1st, often called May Day, just might have more holidays than any other day of the year. It's a celebration of Spring. It's a day of political protests.

What day is may 1st on -

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History of Labor Day

ILGWU Local 62 marches in a Labor Day parade. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kheelcenter/5278801929/in/photolist-7iEKir-93teUn-93wkss-93v4aV-93wxPL-21eteK3-93wxK1-93wkjy-93tf1z-93wiWj-93wiSJ-93teFx-93wUPj-93teXv-93wYkh

Observed the first Monday in September, Labor Day is an annual celebration of the social and economic achievements of American workers. The holiday is rooted in the late nineteenth century, when labor activists pushed for a federal holiday to recognize the many contributions workers have made to America’s strength, prosperity, and well-being.

Early Adopters

A postcard shows a horse-drawn float. The caption reads: Labour Day Float, 1916.

Before it was a federal holiday, Labor Day was recognized by labor activists and individual states. After municipal ordinances were passed in 1885 and 1886, a movement developed to secure state legislation. New York was the first state to introduce a bill, but Oregon was the first to pass a law recognizing Labor Day, on February 21, 1887. During 1887, four more states – Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York – passed laws creating a Labor Day holiday. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 more states had adopted the holiday, and on June 28, 1894, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday.

McGuire v. Maguire: Who Founded Labor Day?

Black and white portraits of machinist Matthew Maguire and carpenter Peter McGuire.

Who first proposed the holiday for workers? It’s not entirely clear, but two workers can make a solid claim to the Founder of Labor Day title.

Some records show that in 1882, Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, suggested setting aside a day for a "general holiday for the laboring classes" to honor those "who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold."

But Peter McGuire's place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that machinist Matthew Maguire, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday.

Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, New Jersey, proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York.

According to the New Jersey Historical Society, after President Cleveland signed the law creating a national Labor Day, the Paterson Morning Call published an opinion piece stating that "the souvenir pen should go to Alderman Matthew Maguire of this city, who is the undisputed author of Labor Day as a holiday." Both Maguire and McGuire attended the country’s first Labor Day parade in New York City that year.

The First Labor Day

A sketch shows a large crowd gathered to watch a parade. The image is labeled September 5, 1882, New York City. The First Labor Day Parade.

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

By 1894, 23 more states had adopted the holiday, and on June 28, 1894, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year a national holiday.

A Nationwide Holiday

Women's Auxiliary Typographical Union

Many Americans celebrate Labor Day with parades, picnics and parties – festivities very similar to those outlined by the first proposal for a holiday, which suggested that the day should be observed with – a street parade to exhibit "the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations" of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day.

Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

American labor has raised the nation’s standard of living and contributed to the greatest production the world has ever known and the labor movement has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pays tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation's strength, freedom, and leadership – the American worker.

More Resources

Источник: https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history

When is May Day, what’s the history and traditional events

While May Day events have been cancelled once again in 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic, learn about May Day history and traditions in our handy guide – and pop dates in your diary to celebrate next year!

When is May Day?

May Day is traditionally a public holiday in the UK celebrated on or around 1st May. In 2021 the May Day bank holiday will take place on Monday 3rd May.

Blue tit in spring blossom

History and traditions of May Day

The celebration of May Day dates back to ancient times, when Romans celebrated the festival of Flora, the goddess of flowers and spring. In Britain, Celtic people celebrated the festival of Beltane on the first of May to mark the halfway point between spring and summer, in contrast to the festival of Samain that fell hallway between autumn and winter on November 1.

Many of the old customs celebrating new life and fertility survive to this day, including Morris dancing and dancing around the maypole.

The earliest maypoles were probably young trees chopped down and erected on the village green with ribbons pinned to the top for local children to dance around. Today rehearsals often take place weeks in advance to ensure that the ribbons form artful plaits around the maypole instead of a tangled web of knots.

Morris Dancing traditions

Despite often being the butt of jokes, Morris dancers are in high demand on May Day, performing at pubs and on village greens up and down the country. Many Morris dancers dance in the dawn, including the Wessex Morris Men who climb above the Cerne Abbas Giant at 5.15am and the Men of Wight who circle the megalithic Longstone at Mottistone as the sun comes up. Morris dancing dates back at least 600 years although it is unclear where the dance style came from, or what it represents. The majority of groups that exist today were formed after the 1930s, basing their dancing style on information collected by folklorists, although some  groups, including those at Abingdon and Chipping Campden, can trace their routes back to the 1800s.

Dressing up in strange costumes appears to be a running theme when it comes to celebrating May Day, and nothing beats the attire of Jack in the Green, who wears a foliage-covered frame work in May Day parades. It is widely believed that the Jack represents the Green Man, a symbol of fertility, but Jacks have also adopted sometimes adopted the cheeky character of Puck.

Although many May Day celebrations date back centuries, they vary from place to place. We’ve rounded up five examples of classic May Day celebrations that take places this weekend.


Best traditional May Day events

While the coronavirus pandemic has seen all May Day events cancelled across the UK, hopefully come 2021 they will be back, better than ever – here is a selection of traditional May Day events to pop in your diary for next year, and support these special local festivals.

The May Day celebrations have altered from their ancient folk roots, differentiating in each of the communities, which still embrace the traditions. Local events such as Maypole dances and country fairs are commonplace for May Day Bank Holiday and make for a great family day out.

The Clun Green Man Festival, Shropshire

Crowds will gather on Clun Bridgeto witness the Green Man defeat the Frost Queen to ensure there is a summer in the valley. The leafy face of the Green Man represents nature, fertility, and the cycle of death and rebirth. After his victory the Green Man will lead a garland-festooned parade to the grounds of Clun Castle. clungreenman.org


Beltane Fire Festival, Edinburgh

In Britain, Celtic people celebrated the festival of Beltane on the first of May to mark the halfway point between spring and summer.

On the evening of the 30 April, several thousand people will congregate at Calton Hill in the centre of Edinburgh, continuing these celebrations with the Beltane Fire Festival. The spectacle includes dazzling fire displays, drumming, processions and plenty of body paint. The fire festival of Beltane is a revitalised celebration of Celtic culture the fire believed to cleanse, purify and increase fertility of all the festival participants. Edinburgh’s festival will involve around three hundred voluntary performers, marking the end of the Scottish winter and welcoming the summer season ahead with optimism.


Jack-in-the-Green Festival, Hastings – join the virtual festival in 2020!

Dressing up in strange costumes appears to be a running theme when it comes to celebrating May Day, and nothing beats the attire of Jack in the Green, who wears a foliage-covered frame work in May Day parades. It is widely believed that the Jack represents the Green Man, a symbol of fertility, but Jacks have also adopted sometimes adopted the cheeky character of Puck.

Hastings celebrates the start of summer with an annual May Day Jack-in-the-Green festival. Look out for the procession following The Release of the Jack, culminating in The Slaying of the Jack, representing the release of the Spirit of Summer. Expect Morris Dancing, poetry, live music and high jinks. This year, the festival is putting on a virtual display, so why not attend and experience some of the magic?


Jack in the Green, Rochester Sweeps Festival, Kent

In the 17th century the making of garlands for May Day inspired so much competition that the greenery eventually covered the entire person – who became a 9-foot tall Jack in the Green. Recently revived after the Victorians tried to kill it off, a number of Jack in the Green events are re-emerging in the 21st century. The Rochester Sweeps festival runs from 1st – 3rd May. blindinglyobvious.co.uk/latest-news/rochester-sweeps

Obby Osses Day, Padstow

Padstow comes alive with the sound of music and merriment and the wild dancing of two ominous-looking ‘Osses on 1st May. The stars of the show are the two ‘Obby ‘Osses – each one consisting of a 6ft wide wooden hoop draped in black sail cloth and hoisted onto a fearsomely, masked local chap. They prance through the town followed by a troupe of musicians, singers, drummers and dancers. In Minehead, Somerset, the 500 year-old tradition sees three separateHobby Horses(‘Obby ‘Osses), parade the streets during the May holiday, culminating in Boogie night.


Riding of the Bounds, Berwick-Upon-Tweed

Berwick-upon-Tweed will be holding the 401st riding of the bounds on 1 May at 09:30am. Berwick’s bounds date back to 1438 when representatives from England and Scotland agreed where one country would end and where the other would begin. The bounds of Berwick were patrolled as early as 1542. This was to protect the town against encroachment by the Scots. Watch the 150 horsemen and women parade through the town from the Barracks to the Guildhall before beginning their ride to continue this tradition.  visitnorthumberland.com


Helston Flora and Furry Dance, Cornwall

Every May, thousands of people take to the streets of Helston for a Cornish festival that’s “bigger than Christmas”. This year’s event takes place on 6 May, when Helston hosts the famous Furry Dance. The town will conjure a carnival atmosphere and be decked with beautiful flowers. Dancing begins early, followed by the seasonal folk play, Hal-an-Tow,which is staged at several venues throughout the town. helstonfloraday.org.uk

Read our feature on the Helston Floral Day


The Hunting of the Earl of Rone, Combe Martin, Devon

Possibly one of the strangest things to happen in Britain, this event is based on a fictional chapter of ‘history’, this year held from 26-29 May. A fool and a hobby horse, accompanied by grenadiers, search the village for the Earl of Tyrone. He is finally captured, mounted on a donkey and paraded through the village, repeatedly shot and revived, shot one last time, taken to the beach and thrown in the sea.


Castleton Garland, Peak District

Elements of beating the bounds, Oak Apple Day (a commemoration of the restoration of Charles II in 1660) and traditional spring festival all appear to collide in this colourful ceremony, usually held on 29 May. A beehive shaped head-dress, covered with wildflowers and greenery, is worn over the head and shoulders of the Garland King, who is dressed in Stuart costume. There is a parade and dancing, accompanied by girls from the village school. The Garland, now separated from its wearer, is hoisted up the church tower and impaled on the pinnacle. Maypole dancing rounds off the big day. The tune used for the procession is similar to that of Helston’s The Faddy.

Источник: https://www.countryfile.com/go-outdoors/days-out/when-is-may-day-whats-the-history-and-traditional-events-to-celebrate/

May Day 2021: Know history and significance of Labour Day

May 1 is the International Day of Workers or International Labour Day dedicated to workers and labourers across the world. This day celebrates labourers and encourages them to be aware of their rights. The day has its origins in the labour union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement. Popularly known as May Day, the day is observed in countries such as India, Cuba and China among other countries.

On this day, people across the world observe the day by conducting protest and march for the rights of workers and save them from exploitation. International Labour Day is a public holiday in many countries.

Know about the history and significance of May Day:

Labour Day has its origins in the labour union movement in the United States in the 19th Century. In 1889, the Marxist International Socialist Congress adopted a resolution for a great international demonstration in which they demanded that the workers should not be made to work for more than 8 hours a day. After this, it became an annual event and May 1 was celebrated as Labour Day.

May Day was first celebrated on May 1, 1890, after it was declared by the first International Congress of Socialist Parties in Europe on July 14, 1889. It was declared for the workers in Paris to dedicate every year on May 1 as the 'Workers Day of International Unity and Solidarity'. May 1 in Europe has historically been linked with rural traditional farmers' festivals but later May Day became associated with the modern labour movement.

In India, Labour’s Day is a national holiday. The first Labour’s Day was celebrated in 1923 in Chennai. This day was observed by the Labour Kisan Party of Hindustan. On this day, communist leader Malayapuram Singaravelu Chettiar asked the government that May 1 should be considered as a national holiday to symbolise the efforts and work of the workers. This day is also known as Kamgar Divas, Kamgar Din and Antrarashtriya Shramik Divas in India.

In the US and Canada, Labour Day is celebrated on the first Monday of September.

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Close StoryИсточник: https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/may-day-2021-know-history-and-significance-of-labour-day-101619837183763.html

May 1st  is not only the first day of the new month, but it’s also a holiday of sorts. May Day is celebrated as a way to welcome summer and as a day to campaign for better labor rights.

Origins in Pagan Times

May Day started as a pre-Christian holiday celebrated throughout Europe, especially among the Gaelic people, who called it Beltaine. It was a holiday that marked the halfway point between the Spring Equinox and the Summer Solstice. Beltaine was also about fertility — people hoped that by observing the holiday, they could ensure that their livestock and crops were fruitful over the coming summer. Bonfires were the centerpiece of Beltaine celebrations, with people dancing around them and feasting long into the night.

Toss The Lentils?

In Rome, the holiday was slightly different. May Day was called Floralia, after Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers. Floralia was similar to Beltaine in that it was a celebration of fertility. Popular Floralia traditions included releasing hares and goats — two animals thought to be most fertile — into the streets. People would also throw beans or lentils into the gathered crowds because both were considered to be symbols of fertility.

May Day Celebrations from the Middle Ages to Today

By the Middle Ages, May Day was a secular event, and the most popular way to celebrate it was to dance around the maypole, which is a tradition that is still practiced in parts of Europe and the United States today.

The maypole dance features a large pole, traditionally cut from a birch tree, with dozens of ribbons fastened to the top. Each dancer takes a ribbon and moves around the pole in a pattern with the rest of the dancers. The goal is to cover the pole in pretty woven designs. This was a particularly popular event in Great Britain, to the point that nearly every village cut their own maypole for May Day. Some villages would even compete with each other to see who had the tallest maypole.

Other traditions include crowns of flowers and the crowing of the May Queen. Rarely, observers of this holiday will also crown a king, too.

It is important to note that May Day celebrations, both past and present, are a tradition of people in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, May marks the onset of winter.

See a Maypole dance celebration from Illinois

A Workers’ Holiday?

May Day took on a double meaning in the 1880s. At the time, people all over the world were fighting for fair workplaces, demanding unions and eight-hour workdays among other things. May Day became known as International Workers’ Day in because it happened to fall on the anniversary of the Haymarket Affair in Chicago.

On May 1, 1886, protesters organized an event that was supposed to last several days. By May 3, protests were turning violent, culminating in a riot at the McCormick Reaper Works in Chicago. This led to an even larger protest the next day as enraged protester flocked to Haymarket Square. During the Haymarket demonstration, a bomb went off among police ranks, wounding 67 officers, seven of whom were killed. Police returned fire, wounding more than 200 protesters and killing several. This event would go on to be known as the Haymarket Tragedy.

In 1889, the International Socialist Conference, a group that was fighting for workers’ rights worldwide, declared that May 1 would forever be known as the International Workers’ Day to commemorate the tragic events of the Haymarket Affair and to help further the cause of workers’ rights around the world.

Don’t Confuse “May Day” With “Mayday”

May Day is not to be confused with “Mayday” which is an urgent call for help, and usually said three times in quick succession.

Keep Exploring

Источник: https://www.farmersalmanac.com/what-is-may-day-27270

watch the video

FIRST OF MAY (Lyrics) - THE BEE GEES
what day is may 1st on

What is the history behind May Day and why do we celebrate it?

May Day probably has Roman origins, emerging from the festival Floralia, which was a celebration of fertility and nature that took place around early May and was dedicated to the goddess Flora. However, it is also believed that May Day has roots in the Celtic festival Beltane – a day that marks the start of summer and considered the best time for animals to be put out to pasture. The Venerable Bede (673 AD–735 AD), one of the greatest scholars of the Anglo-Saxon period, notes that the month of May was the time where cattle were milked three times per day and taken to graze on the land.

On a ceremonial level, this seasonal transition was marked by fire, which symbolised the death of winter and the birth of new life (or the transition of winter to spring and to summer).

  • Saturnalia: the origins of the debauched Roman ‘Christmas’

Is May Day a pagan holiday?

The celebration of May Day is deeply connected to the earth’s enduring cycle of birth, life and death, and the festival typically holds pagan values – focusing on the power and energy of the natural world. Beltane was also a Druid ritual (Druids were pagans) and there were sacrifices by fire made from a pyre of bones, symbolising the birth of the new season. These sacrifices were usually puppets – made of straw or wood from the forest – but were known as the ‘May King’.

Although May Day what day is may 1st on not vehemently opposed by the Christian Church, it faced opposition. For example, in 1240 the bishop of Lincoln was furious that some of his priests enjoyed May Day celebrations, as they were steeped in the pagan tradition the Christian church sought to override. It subsequently developed into a secular celebration – centred on labour, farming and the cycle of the seasons – rather than a Christian one.

How was May Day traditionally celebrated?

Much like the Roman festival Floralia, May Day was celebrated with flora (particularly flowers and other vegetation). John Lydgate’s 15th-century poem Mumming at Bishopwood describes “mighty Flourra, goddes of fresshe floures”, and in The Knight’s Tale, Geoffrey Chaucer mentions woodbine and hawthorn as decorations.

On May Day, people would traditionally collect flowers, blossom and branches to decorate their homes, and as they gathered their bouquets they would literally ‘sing in the May’. Women and girls would rise early and wash their faces in the fresh May morning dew, for it was believed to make them radiant, reduce blemishes and attract their future spouse. Allegedly, in 1515, Henry VIII’s first wife, Catherine of Aragon, took her ladies out in the early morning to bathe in the May dew for its healing benefits.

  • Read more the Celtic festival of Samhain and what it has to do with Halloween

The most iconic expression of May Day celebrations is the May Pole, the centre of the celebrations and the dancing. Originally, this was a large tree in the forest that was decorated in situ, but later it was cut down and brought to the village (or community) and decorated with flowers, wreaths, handkerchiefs and ribbons. The dance around it was an expression of the joy of new life.

How did the tradition of May Day progress?

During the interregnum period from 1649, May Day was banned – considered to be another frivolous and blasphemous celebration. However, like much of the frivolity and joy that was stamped out by the Puritans, it was reinstated during what day is may 1st on Restoration period under Charles II. May Day continued to be a civic celebration and developed further as a festival for labourers and farmers such as milk maids. This is apparent in a ballad from 1630 that contains a final verse “In honour o’ th’ milking paile”. This connection to milk maids aligns with the May Day custom described by the Venerable Bede of cows being more regularly milked come May.

The May Pole dance was popular in Victorian society and in the 19th century there was a revival of the adornment and dancing around the Maypole by girls. Today, schools and villages still sometimes celebrate May Day and it endures most commonly as a communal custom; an expression of togetherness, song and dance.

There are some places, however, in Devon, Cornwall and Scotland, that continue the ancient custom of Beltane – on 1 May, fires are still burnt to cleanse the old and welcome summer and the hope of new life.

The Evil May Day Riots of 1517: what happened?

On the night of 30 April/1 May 1517, Tudor London was gripped by violent riots. But what was the cause? Explore the Evil May Day Riots…

Evil May Day
Источник: https://www.historyextra.com/period/medieval/may-day-history-origins-celebrate-pagan-bank-holiday-maypole-facts-explain/

May 1st  is not only the first day of the new month, but it’s also a holiday of sorts. May Day is celebrated as a way to welcome summer and as a day to campaign for better labor rights.

Origins in Pagan Times

May Day started as a pre-Christian holiday celebrated throughout Europe, especially among the Gaelic people, who called it Beltaine. It was a holiday that marked the halfway point between the Spring Equinox and the Summer Solstice. Beltaine was also about fertility — people hoped that by observing the holiday, they could ensure that their livestock and crops were what day is may 1st on over the coming summer. Bonfires were the centerpiece of Beltaine celebrations, with people dancing around them and feasting long into the night.

Toss The Lentils?

In Rome, the holiday was slightly different. May Day was called Floralia, after Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers. Floralia was similar to Beltaine in that it was a celebration of fertility. Popular Floralia traditions included releasing hares and goats — two animals thought to be most fertile — into the streets. People would also throw beans or lentils into the gathered crowds because both were considered to be symbols of fertility.

May Day Celebrations from the Middle Ages to Today

By the Middle Ages, May Day was a secular event, and the most popular way to celebrate it was to dance around the maypole, which is a tradition that is still practiced in parts of Europe and the United States today.

The maypole dance features a large pole, traditionally cut from a birch tree, with dozens of ribbons fastened to the top. Each dancer takes a ribbon and moves around the pole in a pattern with the rest what day is may 1st on the dancers. The goal is to cover the pole in pretty woven designs. This was a particularly popular event in Great Britain, to the point that nearly every village cut their own maypole for May Day. Some villages would even compete with each other to see who had the tallest maypole.

Other traditions include crowns of flowers and the crowing of the May Queen. Rarely, observers of this holiday will also crown a king, too.

It is important to note that May Day celebrations, both past and present, are a tradition of people in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, May marks the onset of winter.

See a Maypole dance celebration from Illinois

A Workers’ Holiday?

May Day took on a double meaning in the 1880s. At the time, people all over the world were fighting for fair workplaces, demanding unions and eight-hour workdays among other things. May Day became known as International Workers’ Day in because it happened to fall on the anniversary of the Haymarket Affair in Chicago.

On May 1, 1886, protesters organized an event that was supposed to last several days. By May 3, protests were turning violent, culminating in a riot at the McCormick Reaper Works in Chicago. This led to an even larger protest the next day as enraged protester flocked to Haymarket Square. During the Haymarket demonstration, a bomb went off among police ranks, wounding 67 officers, seven of whom were killed. Police returned fire, wounding more than 200 protesters and killing several. This event would go on to be known as the Haymarket Tragedy.

In 1889, the International Socialist Conference, a group that was fighting for workers’ rights worldwide, declared that May 1 would forever be known as the International Workers’ Day to commemorate the tragic events of the Haymarket Affair and to help further the cause of workers’ rights around the world.

Don’t Confuse “May Day” With “Mayday”

May Day is not to be confused with “Mayday” which is an urgent call for help, and usually said three times in quick succession.

Keep Exploring

Источник: https://www.farmersalmanac.com/what-is-may-day-27270

May Day 2021: Know history and significance of Labour Day

May 1 is the International Day of Workers or International Labour Day dedicated to workers and labourers across the world. This day celebrates labourers and encourages them to be aware of their rights. The day has its origins in the labour union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement. Popularly known as May Day, the day is observed in countries such as India, Cuba and China among other countries.

On this day, people across the world observe the day by conducting protest and march for the rights of workers and save them from exploitation. International Labour Day is a public holiday in many countries.

Know about the history and significance of May Day:

Labour Day has its origins in the labour union movement in the United States in the 19th Century. In 1889, the Marxist International Socialist Congress adopted a resolution for a great international demonstration in which they demanded that the workers should not be made to work for more than 8 hours a day. After this, it became an annual event and May 1 was celebrated as Labour Day.

May Day was first celebrated on May 1, 1890, after it was declared by the first International Congress of Socialist Parties in Europe on July 14, 1889. It was declared for the workers in Paris to dedicate every year on May 1 as the 'Workers Day of International Unity and Solidarity'. May 1 in Europe has historically been linked with rural traditional farmers' festivals but later May Day became associated with the modern labour movement.

In India, Labour’s Day is a national holiday. The first Labour’s Day was celebrated in 1923 in Chennai. This day was observed by the Labour Kisan Party of Hindustan. On this day, communist leader Malayapuram Singaravelu Chettiar asked the government that May 1 should be considered as a national holiday to symbolise the efforts and work of the workers. This day is also known as Kamgar Divas, Kamgar Din and Antrarashtriya Shramik Divas in India.

In the US and Canada, Labour Day is celebrated on the first Monday of September.

Get our Daily News Capsule

Thank you for subscribing to our Daily News Capsule newsletter.

Close StoryИсточник: https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/may-day-2021-know-history-and-significance-of-labour-day-101619837183763.html

When is May Day, what’s the history and traditional events

While May Day events have been cancelled once again in 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic, learn about May Day history and traditions in our handy guide – and pop dates in your diary to celebrate next year!

When is May Day?

May Day is traditionally a public holiday in the UK celebrated on or around 1st May. In 2021 the May Day bank holiday will take place on Monday 3rd May.

Blue tit in spring blossom

History and traditions of May Day

The celebration of May Day dates back to ancient times, when Romans celebrated the festival of Flora, the goddess of flowers and spring. In Britain, Celtic people celebrated the festival of Beltane on the first of May to mark the halfway point between spring and summer, in contrast to the festival of Samain that fell hallway between autumn and winter on November 1.

Many of the old customs celebrating open post office near me today life and fertility survive to this day, including Morris dancing and dancing around the maypole.

The earliest maypoles were probably young trees chopped down and erected on the village green with ribbons pinned to the top for local children to dance around. Today rehearsals often take place weeks in advance to ensure that the ribbons form artful plaits around the maypole instead of a tangled web of knots.

Morris Dancing traditions

Despite often being the butt of jokes, Morris dancers are in high demand on May Day, performing at pubs and on village greens up and down the country. Many Morris dancers dance in the dawn, including the Wessex Morris Men who climb above the Cerne Abbas Giant at 5.15am and the Men of Wight who circle the megalithic Longstone at What day is may 1st on as the sun comes up. Morris dancing dates back at least 600 years although it is unclear where the dance style came from, or what it represents. The majority of groups that exist today were formed after the 1930s, basing their dancing style on information collected by folklorists, although some  groups, including those at Abingdon and Chipping Campden, can trace their routes back to the 1800s.

Dressing up in strange costumes appears to be a running theme when it comes to celebrating May Day, and nothing beats the attire of Jack in the Green, who wears a foliage-covered frame work in May Day parades. It is widely believed that the Jack represents the Green Man, a symbol of fertility, but Jacks have also adopted sometimes adopted the cheeky character of Puck.

Although many May Day celebrations date back centuries, they vary from place to place. We’ve rounded up five examples of classic May Day celebrations that take places this weekend.


Best traditional May Day events

While the coronavirus pandemic has seen all May Day events cancelled across the UK, hopefully come 2021 they will be back, better than ever – here is a selection of traditional May Day events to pop in your diary for next year, and support these special local festivals.

The May Day celebrations have altered from their ancient folk roots, differentiating in each of the communities, which still embrace the traditions. Local events such as Maypole dances and country fairs are commonplace for May Day Bank Holiday and make for a great family day out.

The Clun Green Man Festival, Shropshire

Crowds will gather on Clun Bridgeto witness the Green Man defeat the Frost Queen to ensure there is a summer in the valley. The leafy face of the Green Man represents nature, what day is may 1st on, and the cycle of death and rebirth. After his victory the Green Man will lead a garland-festooned parade to the grounds of Clun Castle. clungreenman.org


Beltane Fire Festival, Edinburgh

In Britain, Celtic people celebrated the festival of Beltane on the first of May to mark the halfway point between spring and summer.

On the evening of the 30 April, several thousand people will congregate at Calton Hill in the centre of Edinburgh, continuing these celebrations with the Beltane Fire Festival. The spectacle includes dazzling fire displays, drumming, processions and plenty of body paint. The fire festival of Beltane is a revitalised celebration of Celtic culture the fire believed to cleanse, purify and increase fertility of all the festival participants. Edinburgh’s festival will involve around three hundred voluntary performers, marking the end of the Closest huntington near me winter and welcoming the summer season ahead with optimism.


Jack-in-the-Green Festival, Hastings – join the virtual festival in 2020!

Dressing up in strange costumes appears to be a running theme when it comes to celebrating May Day, and nothing beats the attire of Jack in the Green, who wears a foliage-covered frame work in May Day parades. It is widely believed that the Jack represents the Green Man, a symbol of fertility, but Jacks have also adopted sometimes adopted the cheeky character of Puck.

Hastings celebrates the start of summer with an annual May Day Jack-in-the-Green festival. Look out for the procession following The Release of the Jack, culminating in The Slaying of the Jack, representing the release of the Spirit of Summer. Expect Morris Dancing, poetry, live music and high jinks. This year, the festival is putting on a virtual display, so why not attend and experience some of the magic?


Jack in the Green, Rochester Sweeps Festival, Kent

In the 17th century the making of garlands for May Day inspired so much competition that the greenery eventually covered the entire person – who became a 9-foot tall Jack in the Green. Recently revived after the Victorians tried to kill it off, a number of Jack in the Green events are re-emerging in the 21st century. The Rochester Sweeps festival runs from 1st – 3rd May. blindinglyobvious.co.uk/latest-news/rochester-sweeps

Obby Osses Day, Padstow

Padstow comes alive with the sound of music and merriment and the wild dancing of two ominous-looking ‘Osses on 1st May. The stars of the show are the two ‘Obby ‘Osses – each one consisting of a 6ft wide wooden hoop draped in black sail what day is may 1st on and hoisted onto a fearsomely, masked local chap. They prance through the town followed by a troupe of musicians, singers, drummers and dancers. In Minehead, Somerset, the 500 year-old tradition sees three separateHobby Horses(‘Obby ‘Osses), parade the streets during the May holiday, culminating in Boogie night.


Riding of the Bounds, Berwick-Upon-Tweed

Berwick-upon-Tweed will be holding the 401st riding of the bounds on 1 May at 09:30am. Berwick’s bounds date back to 1438 when representatives from England and Scotland agreed where one country would end and where the other would begin. The bounds of Berwick were patrolled as early as 1542. This was to protect the town against encroachment by the Scots. Watch the 150 horsemen and women parade through the town from the Barracks to the Guildhall before beginning their ride to continue this tradition.  visitnorthumberland.com


Helston Flora and Furry Dance, Cornwall

Every May, thousands of people take to the streets of Helston for a Cornish festival that’s “bigger than Christmas”. This year’s event takes place on 6 May, when Helston hosts the famous Furry Dance. The town will conjure a carnival atmosphere and be decked with beautiful flowers. Dancing begins early, followed by the seasonal folk play, Hal-an-Tow,which is staged at several venues throughout the town. helstonfloraday.org.uk

Read our feature on the What day is may 1st on Floral Day


The Hunting of the Earl of Rone, Combe Martin, Devon

Possibly one of the strangest things to happen in Britain, this event is based on a fictional chapter of ‘history’, this year held from 26-29 May. A fool and a hobby horse, accompanied by grenadiers, search the village for the Earl of Tyrone. He is finally captured, mounted on a donkey and paraded through the village, repeatedly shot and revived, shot one last time, taken to the beach and thrown in the sea.


Castleton Garland, Peak District

Elements of beating the bounds, Oak Apple Day (a commemoration of the restoration of Charles II in 1660) and traditional spring festival all appear to collide in this colourful ceremony, usually held on 29 May. A beehive shaped head-dress, covered with wildflowers and greenery, is worn over the head and shoulders of the Garland King, who is dressed in Stuart costume. There is a parade and dancing, accompanied by girls from the village school. The Garland, now separated from its wearer, is hoisted up the church tower and impaled on the pinnacle. Maypole dancing rounds off the big day. The tune used for the procession is similar to that of Helston’s The Faddy.

Источник: https://www.countryfile.com/go-outdoors/days-out/when-is-may-day-whats-the-history-and-traditional-events-to-celebrate/

Contents

  1. Origins of May Day: Beltane
  2. May Day Maypole Dance
  3. International Workers’ Day
  4. Haymarket Riot
  5. May Day Today

May Day is a May 1 celebration with a long and varied history, dating back millennia. Throughout the years, there have been many different events and festivities worldwide, most with the express purpose of welcoming in a change of season (spring in the Northern Hemisphere). In the 19th century, May Day took on a new meaning, as an International Workers’ Day grew out of the 19th-century labor movement for worker’s rights and an eight-hour workday in the United States. May Day 2021 will be celebrated on Saturday, May 1, 2021.

Origins of May Day: Beltane

The Celts of the British Isles believed May 1 to be the most important day of the year, when the festival of Beltane was held.

This May Day festival was thought to divide the year in half, between the light and the dark. Symbolic fire was one of the main rituals of the festival, helping to celebrate the return of life and fertility to the world.

When the Romans took over the British Isles, they brought with them their five-day celebration known as Floralia, devoted to the worship of the goddess of flowers, Flora. Taking place between April 20 and May 2, the rituals of this celebration were eventually combined with Beltane.

READ MORE: 8 Facts About the Celts

May Day Maypole Dance

Another popular tradition of May Day involves the maypole. While the exact origins of the maypole remain unknown, the annual traditions surrounding it can be traced back to medieval times, and some are still celebrated today.

Villagers would enter the woods to find a maypole that was set up for the day in small towns (or sometimes permanently in larger cities). The day’s festivities involved merriment, as people would dance around the pole clad with colorful streamers and ribbons.

Historians believe the first maypole dance originated as part of a fertility ritual, where the pole symbolized male fertility and baskets and wreaths symbolized female fertility.

The maypole never really took root in America, where May Day celebrations were discouraged by the Puritans. But other forms of celebrations did find their way to the New World.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, May Basket Day was celebrated across the country, where baskets were created with flowers, candies and other treats and hung on the doors of friends, neighbors and loved ones on May 1.

What does May Day have to do with the international distress call, "Mayday, Mayday, Mayday"? Nothing, as it turns out. The code was invented in 1923 by an airport radio officer in London. Challenged to come up with a word that would be easily understood by pilots and ground staff in case of an emergency, Frederick Mockford coined the word "mayday" because it sounded like "m'aider," a shortened version of the French term for " come and help me."

International Workers’ Day

The connection between May Day and labor rights began in the United States. During the 19th century, at the height of the Industrial Revolution, thousands of men, women and children were dying every year from poor working conditions and long hours.

In an attempt to end these inhumane conditions, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions (which would later become the American Federation of Labor, or AFL) held a convention in Chicago in 1884. The FOTLU proclaimed “eight hours shall constitute a legal day’s labor from and after May 1, 1886.”

The following year the Knights of Labor—then America’s largest labor organization—backed the proclamation as both groups encouraged workers to strike and demonstrate.

On May 1, 1886, more than 300,000 workers (40,000 in Chicago alone) from 13,000 business walked out of their jobs across the country. In the following days, more workers joined and the number of strikers grew to what day is may 1st on 100,000.

READ MORE: History of the Labor Movement 

Haymarket Riot

Overall, the protests were peaceful, but that all changed on May 3 where Chicago police and workers clashed at the McCormick Reaper Works. The next day a rally was planned at Haymarket Square to protest the killing and wounding of several workers by the what day is may 1st on.

The speaker, August Spies, was winding down when a group of officers arrived to disperse the crowd. As the police advanced, an individual who was never identified threw a bomb into their ranks. Chaos ensued, and at least seven police officers and eight civilians died as a result of the violence that day.

The Haymarket Riot, also known as the Haymarket Affair, set off a national wave of repression. In August 1886, eight men labeled as anarchists were convicted in a sensational and controversial trial despite there being no solid evidence linking the defendants to the bombing. The jury was considered to be biased, with ties to big business.

Seven of the convicted men received a death sentence, and the eighth was sentenced to 15 years in prison. In the end, four of the men were hanged, one committed suicide and the remaining three were pardoned six years later.

A few years after the Haymarket Riot and subsequent trials shocked the world, a newly formed coalition of socialist and labor parties in Europe called for a demonstration to honor the “Haymarket Martyrs.” In 1890, over 300,000 people protested at a May Day rally in London.

The workers’ history of May 1 was eventually embraced by many governments worldwide, not just those with socialist or communist influences.

READ MORE: The Haymarket Riot: When a Protest Against Anti-Labor Police Brutality Turned Violent

May Day Today

Today, May Day is an official holiday in 66 countries and unofficially celebrated in many more, but ironically it is rarely recognized in the country where it began, the United States of America.

After the 1894 Pullman Strike, President Grover Cleveland officially moved the U.S. celebration of Labor Day to the first Monday in September, intentionally severing ties with the international worker’s celebration for fear that it would build support for communism and other radical causes.

Dwight D. Eisenhower tried to reinvent May Day in 1958, further distancing the memories of the Haymarket Riot, by declaring May 1 to be “Law Day,” celebrating the place of law in the creation of the United States. May Day 2021 is on May 1, 2021.

Источник: https://www.history.com
what day is may 1st on

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