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When is the next jewish holiday


when is the next jewish holiday

Over the next few weeks, members of the Jewish faith will observe the The second High Holiday is Yom Kippur, or the Day of Atonement. Each Jewish holiday is explained following the calendar below. Jewish holidays begin at sundown on the preceding evening and conclude on the night of the. Here's everything you need to know about the holiday, including when and decided which will live and which will die over the next year.
when is the next jewish holiday
when is the next jewish holiday
when is the next jewish holiday

When is the next jewish holiday -

When is Purim 2021? Date, meaning behind the Jewish holiday and how it’s celebrated

When it comes to Jewish holidays, Purim is certainly one of the must beloved and most ostentatious.

It celebrates a Queen who thwarted the attempted genocide of her people many centuries ago, but despite its sombre beginnings it has evolved into a colourful feast of celebration.

But how will it be marked this year? Here’s everything you need to know.

What is Purim?

Purim is a Jewish holiday that incorporates dressing up in costume, and eating and drinking in celebration.

Ultra-orthodox Jewish men pray next to children wearing crowns ahead of the Jewish holiday of Purim, at the Western Wall in Jerusalem's old city on February 23, 2021. (Photo by MENAHEM KAHANA / AFP) (Photo by MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP via Getty Images)

The festival commemorates the defeat of an attempted genocide of the Jews of the Persian Empire in fifth century BCE.

After a virtuous Jewish woman named Esther married King Ahasuerus of Persia, she and her Uncle Mordechai interrupted a plot by the king’s right-hand-man, Haman, who planed “to destroy, kill and annihilate all the Jews, young and old, infants and women, in a single day”.

At the eleventh hour, Esther revealed to the king that she was Jewish, meaning Haman’s plan would result in her death. The King instead sentenced his friend to be executed at the very gallows he’d prepared for the Jews.

When is Purim?

Purim is celebrated every year on the 14th of the Hebrew month of Adar (late winter/early spring).

This year Purim falls on the night of Thursday 25 February, into Friday 26 February.

How is it traditionally celebrated?

Purim is one of the more fun-loving holidays in the Jewish calendar where fancy dress is a must, with girls dressing up as Queen Esther, boys as King Ahasuerus and rabbis donning comedy hats.

The synagogue service involves a retelling of the Purim tale from the book of Esther where everyone theatrically hisses and makes noise when Haman’s name is mentioned.

Charity also plays a part and observers are expected to give money and food to those in need.

Parties are hosted across the community, with traditional food served including a filled biscuit known as Hamantaschen that is triangular shape and meant to denote Haman’s hat.

What about this year?

Of course, Covid has hit every community.

A boy wearing a dress-up costume to mark the upcoming Jewish holiday of Purim, which is a celebration of the Jews' salvation from genocide in ancient Persia, walks on a sports court at his school in Jerusalem February 24, 2021. REUTERS/Ammar Awad

The UK’s Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis, has already warned against Jews gathering this Purim, saying “let us guarantee that we will celebrate safety”.

This year’s Purim will be mostly marked at home in bubbles, with more low-key celebrations, as well as virtual events.

Children will still be able to dress up at home, and some parents may incorporate the baking of traditional foods into their home-education this week.

But there is concern some of the most strictly Orthodox (Haredi) Jews may not adhere to the rules as prayer is still permitted in places of worship.

Purim last year is thought to have played a part in why the UK’s Jewish community was affected so badly so early. Data suggests deaths among British Jews were 3.7 times higher than average in April 2020.

The holiday took place just a few weeks before lockdown was brought in, and featured poorly-ventilated rooms full of people crammed together.

Источник: https://inews.co.uk/news/uk/purim-2021-when-date-what-meaning-jewish-holiday-celebrations-story-885621

Yom Kippur 2021: When is the holy Jewish festival and what is its significance?

The Jewish festival of Yom Kippur is perceived as the holiest day of the year in Judaism.

Taking place just over a week after the Jewish New Year, the festival is commemorated with a day-long fast.

The aim of the fast is to encourage Jewish people to reflect on their past year, repent for any wrongdoings and wish for a happy and healthy year ahead.

Here is everything you need to know about Yom Kippur:

When is it?

This year, Yom Kippur starts during the evening of Wednesday 15 September and ends during the evening of Thursday 16 September.

The fast, which is observed for approximately 25 hours, starts at 7.01pm and ends at 8pm the following day.

On the Jewish lunisolar calendar, Yom Kippur begins on the ninth day of the month of Tishrei and ends on the tenth day.

Tishrei is the first month of the civil year and the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year, according to the Jewish calendar.

It occurs at the end of the "10 Days of Repentance", a period that begins with the celebration of the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah.

What is its significance?

In Hebrew, "Yom" means "day" and "Kippur" means "to atone", which is why the observance is often referred to as the "Day of Atonement".

The day of repentance is marked with an annual fast, which commences and ends with a feast.

"Fasting is an opportunity for each of us to observe Yom Kippur in a most personal way," states Jewish education site My Jewish Learning.

The shofar, an ancient musical instrument, is blown in synagogue on Yom Kippur

"Fasting on Yom Kippur provides the key to our inner awakening."

According to Jewish belief, on Rosh Hashanah, Hashem (God) writes every person's name into special books, the "righteous" being written into the Book of Life and the "evil" being written into the Book of Death.

It is believed the names are written into the books on a temporary basis, with God giving his final judgement on Yom Kippur.

"In actuality, the vast majority of us are neither totally good or bad. We're more like 50/50, so we have a few more days until Yom Kippur to tip the scales," states a rabbi for Jewish organisation Aish.

How is it commemorated?

On Yom Kippur, Jewish people go to synagogue to hear and partake in prayer services.

The beginning of Yom Kippur is marked with the recital of a prayer service called Kol Nidre, which takes place at sundown on the eve of the festival.

"Ironically, it is not really a prayer at all, but rather a statement. A statement that deals with promises, vows and other sorts of verbal commitments commonly made in the course of the year," Orthodox Jewish organisation Chabad states.

On a typical day at synagogue, three prayer services are held.

However, on the Day of Atonement, an additional two prayer services are recited.

During the services, special passages are read from the Torah and "Vidui" – confessions – are chanted.

A special memorial prayer called "Yizkor" is also recited in synagogue on Yom Kippur.

The prayer is observed in memory of relatives and friends who have passed away.

When Jewish people go to synagogue on the day of the observance, it is customary to wear white, as a symbol of atonement and purity.

Those who are devout may also refrain from partaking in activities such as using electricity, driving, washing or wearing leather.

The end of the fast is marked by the blowing of the shofar, an ancient musical instrument typically made from a ram's horn.

The shofar is also blown on Rosh Hashanah and on every morning of the month of Elul, which precedes the Jewish New Year.

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Источник: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/yom-kippur-2021-meaning-greeting-b1921376.html

30 Kislev 5782

Haftarah: Zechariah 4:1-7

Rosh Chodesh Hanukkah

At the end of two years' time Pharaoh had a dream: there he was, standing by the Nile, when seven cows came up out of the Nile, handsome and fat. - Genesis 41:1-2

Torah Portion

Vayigash

Genesis 44:18−47:27

Holidays


Back to Holidays

Yom Kippur



What does Yom Kippur celebrate?

Yom Kippur is a Jewish holiday. It is also called the "Day of Atonement" and is considered to be the holiest day of the year for Jewish people.

When is Yom Kippur celebrated?

It is celebrated at the end of the High Holy Days, ten days after Rosh Hashanah. This occurs sometime during the months of September or October.

Who celebrates this day?

This is the holiest of the Jewish holidays and is observed by most Jewish people.

What do people do to celebrate?

This day is a very serious day for Jewish people. They must fast, meaning that they do not eat or drink. They are also not allowed to work. They spend a good deal of the day praying and attending services at the synagogue. The day has five official prayer services.

The main thing Jewish people do on this day is ask God for forgiveness of their sins. This is called Teshuvah or repentance.

History of Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur has been observed by the Jewish people for thousands of years. The day is mentioned in the Bible and Torah several times as set aside special by God.

Fun Facts About Yom Kippur
  • Most people wear white during the holiday. Married men often wear a white robe called a kittle.
  • The Yom Kippur War occurred when Syria and Egypt attacked Israel on Yom Kippur hoping that their army would be distracted by the holiday.
  • Many people fast for 25 hours during the holiday.
  • People are also not supposed to bathe, wash, wear perfumes, or wear leather shoes on this day.
  • Children and pregnant women are not permitted to fast.
  • The common greeting on this holiday is "have an easy fast".
  • Major League Baseball pitcher Sandy Koufax was Jewish. He decided not to pitch in game 1 of the World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur.
  • The next major Jewish holiday after Yom Kippur is called Sukkot.
  • Yom Kippur is the second of the High Holy Days after Rosh Hashanah.
Yom Kippur Dates
  • September 26, 2012
  • September 14, 2013
  • October 4, 2014
  • September 23, 2015
  • October 12, 2016
  • October 1, 2017
  • September 20, 2018
  • October 10, 2019
October Holidays
Yom Kippur
Indigenous Peoples' Day
Columbus Day
Child Health Day
Halloween

Back to Holidays
Источник: https://www.ducksters.com/holidays/yom_kippur.php

24 Kislev 5782 to 2 Tevet 5782

Hanukkah, one of the most widely observed Jewish holidays, is a festive eight-day celebration that for many people falls during the darkest, coldest season of the year. Also called the Festival of Lights, the holiday brings light, joy, and warmth to our homes and communities as we celebrate with candles, food, family, and friends.

Torah Portion

Mikeitz

Genesis 41:1−44:17

Shabbat ShuvaSep 10-11, 2021 Fri-ShabbatShabbat that falls between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (Shabbat of Returning)Shabbat ShirahJan 14-15, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat of SongShabbat ShekalimFeb 25-26, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat before Rosh Chodesh AdarShabbat ZachorMar 11-12, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat before PurimShabbat ParahMar 25-26, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat of the Red HeiferShabbat HaChodesh Apr 1-2, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat before Rosh Chodesh NissanShabbat HaGadolApr 8-9, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat before PesachShabbat ChazonAug 5-6, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat before Tish'a B'Av (Shabbat of Prophecy/Shabbat of Vision)Shabbat NachamuAug 12-13, 2022 Fri-ShabbatShabbat after Tish'a B'Av (Shabbat of Consolation)Shabbat Rosh ChodeshWhen Shabbat falls on Rosh ChodeshShabbat Machar ChodeshWhen Shabbat falls the day before Rosh Chodesh
Источник: https://bowdonshul.org.uk/holidays/

Over the next few weeks, members of the Jewish faith will observe the High Holy Days in the month of Tishrei in the Jewish calendar, usually in September and October. These holidays commemorate concepts such as renewal, forgiveness, freedom and joy.

As a scholar of the Bible and the ancient world, I am continually impressed with how the history of these festivals offers consolation and encourages people toward living well, even during a pandemic.

What are the High Holy Days?

Of the two main High Holy Days, also called the High Holidays, the first is Rosh Hashanah, or the New Year celebration. It is one of two new year celebrations in the Jewish faith, the other being Passover in the spring.

The second High Holiday is Yom Kippur, or the Day of Atonement.

In addition to the main Holy Days, there are other celebrations that occur as part of the festival season. One is Sukkot, or the Festival of the Booths, during which meals and rituals take place in a “sukkah,” or a makeshift structure constructed with a tree-branch roof.

The second entails twocelebrations, which in some traditions are part of the same holiday and in others occur on two separate, consecutive days: Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah.

Shemini Atzeret is Hebrew for “eighth (day of) assembly,” counting eight days from Sukkot. Simchat Torah is Hebrew for “joy/rejoicing of the Torah” – the Torah being the first five books of the Bible, from Genesis to Deuteronomy, believed to have been revealed to Moses.

Of particular interest for the High Holy Days in 2021 is that Rosh Hashanah also begins a yearlong observance known as the “Shmita.”

Commemorated once every seven years, the term comes from a Hebrew phrase that appears in the Bible in a number of passages. Some of these passages command that the farmer “drops” or “releases” his crops. Another verse associates the act with the forgiveness of debts. In another passage in the Bible, the Shmita is connected with the reading of God’s revelation in the law.

The exact nature of the action denoted by Shmita is debated, but the idea is that some portion of the food is left behind for the poor and hungry in society.

In this manner, the beginning of the High Holy Days in 2021 is a reminder to care for those who have been struggling.

Why celebrate these festivals?

The origins and reasons for the High Holy Days are in some fashion encoded in the Bible and in the agrarian and religious culture that produced it. The millennia of Jewish tradition between the Bible and the present has informed many of the celebrations as well, in ways that go beyond the biblical texts.

The first holiday, Rosh Hashanah, celebrates renewal. It involves the blowing of the shofar horn, itself connected to the ram sacrificed instead of Abraham’s son, as God had commanded Abraham to do. Important activities include attending synagogue to hear the shofar, as well as eating apple slices with honey, the former representing hopes for fruitfulness and the honey symbolizing the desire for a sweet year.

View of theTorah at a synagogue.

It also often involves a ritual of throwing bread onto running water, called a tashlich, symbolizing the removal of sins from people.

Rosh Hashanah is believed to mark the date of the creation of the world, and it begins the “Days of Awe,” a 10-day period culminating in Yom Kippur.

The term “Days of Awe” itself is a more literal translation of the Hebrew phrasing used for the High Holy Days.

Concepts of repentance and forgiveness are particularly highlighted in Yom Kippur. Its origins are found in the Hebrew Bible, where it describes the one day a year in which premeditated, intentional sins, such as willfully violating divine commands and prohibitions, were forgiven.

Intentional sins were envisioned as generating impurity in the heart of the temple in Jerusalem, where God was thought to live. Impurity from intentional sins was believed by Israelites to be a threat to this divine presence since God might choose to leave the temple.

The biblical description of Yom Kippur involved a series of sacrifices and rituals designed to remove sin from the people. For example, one goat was thought to bear the sins of the Israelites and was sent off to the wilderness, where it was consumed by Azazel, a mysterious, perhaps demonic force. Azazel consumed the goat and the sins that it carried. The term “scapegoat” in English derives from this act.

Yom Kippur is both the holiest day of the Jewish calendar and also one of the most somber, as the time for repentance includes fasting and prayer.

Sukkot, Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah

The Festival of Sukkot likely began as an agricultural celebration, and the booths were shelters in which farmers stayed during the collection of grain, which was to be processed for the year.

Vestiges of this agricultural commemoration appear in certain passages in the Bible, one of which indicates that the festival is to last seven days to mark the time period in which Israelites dwelt in booths, or makeshift dwellings with branches, when leaving Egypt.

This feast was known as zeman simchatenu, or “the time of our rejoicing,” hearkening to the themes of gratitude, freedom from Egypt and the reading of God’s revelation as found in the Torah to all Israel.

Such a time of rejoicing contrasts with the somber repentance and fasting that feature in Yom Kippur. So vital was the Festival of Booths that it is also known as simply “the chag,” or “the feast,” a word related to the more familiar hajj pilgrimage in Islam.

This period of seven days ends with Shemini Atzeret on the eighth day, both a connected celebration capping off Sukkot and a festival in its own right.

The annual reading of the Torah ends with the final text of Deuteronomy. The beginning of the next annual reading cycle, starting with the first book Genesis, is also celebrated. This act of beginning a new year of reading the Bible is commemorated in the festival called Simchat Torah.

The observance of Simchat Torah was a later innovation, described already in the fifth century or so but not formalized or identified by this name until the medieval period.

Why do they matter?

Religious calendars and festivals can force people to encounter certain ideas in the year. For example, they can enable them to face the more difficult dynamics of life like repentance and forgiveness, providing avenues to reflect on the events of the past year and to find courage to live differently in the next year where needed.

In this manner, structuring the celebration of the new year around remembrances of a variety of human experiences, both sorrow and joy, entails a profound recognition of the complexity of relationships and experiences in life.

In particular, the High Holy Days – as illustrated in the renewal of Rosh Hashanah, the somber reflection of Yom Kippur – as well as the joyous celebrations in Sukkot and Simchat Torah, offer a means to remember that time is itself healing and restorative.

As such, the High Holy Days and the holiday season in Tishrei help to mark the year in meaningful ways and to highlight our moral responsibility toward one another.

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Источник: https://theconversation.com/what-are-the-jewish-high-holy-days-a-look-at-rosh-hashanah-yom-kippur-and-a-month-of-celebrating-renewal-and-moral-responsibility-166079

30 Kislev 5782

Haftarah: Zechariah 4:1-7

Rosh Chodesh Hanukkah

At the end of two years' time Pharaoh had a dream: there he was, standing by when is the next jewish holiday Nile, when seven cows came up out of the Nile, handsome and fat. - Genesis 41:1-2

Torah Portion

Vayigash

Genesis 44:18−47:27

11 Tevet 5782

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Jewish

Rabbi with Arba'at Ha-Minim.

During the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, one fruit and branches from three plants are waved during a special ceremony that represents service to God.

The current definition of the Jewish calendar is generally said to have been set down by the Sanhedrin president Hillel II in approximately C.E. 359. The original details of his calendar are, however, uncertain.

The Jewish calendar is used for religious purposes by Jews all over the world, and it is the official calendar of Israel.

The Jewish calendar is a combined solar/lunar calendar, in that it strives to have its years coincide with the tropical year and its months coincide with the synodic months. This is a complicated goal, and the rules for the Jewish calendar are correspondingly fascinating.

Lunisolar calendars use months to approximate the tropical year. Examples are the Jewish and Chinese calendars. Since 12 months are about 11 days shorter than the tropical year, a leap month (also called intercalary month) is inserted about every third year to keep the calendar in tune with the seasons. The big question is how to do this. A simple method is to just base it on nature. In ancient Israel, the religious leaders would determine the date for Passover each spring by seeing if the roads were dry enough for the pilgrims and if the lambs were ready for slaughter. If not, they would add one more month. An aboriginal tribe in Taiwan would go out to sea with lanterns near the new moon at the beginning of spring. If the migrating flying fish appeared, there would be fish for New Year’s reunion dinner. If not, they would try their luck next month.

What does a Jewish year look like?

An ordinary (non-leap) year has 353, 354, or 355 days. A leap year has 383, 384, or 385 days. The three lengths of the years are termed, "deficient," "regular," and "complete," respectively.

An ordinary year has 12 months, a leap year has 13 months.

Every month starts (approximately) on the day of a new moon.

The months and their lengths are:

NameLength in a deficient yearLength in a regular yearLength in a complete year
Tishri303030
Heshvan292930
Kislev293030
Tevet292929
Shevat303030
Adar I303030
Adar II292929
Nisan303030
Iyar292929
Sivan303030
Tammuz292929
Av303030
Elul292929
Total:353 or 383354 or 384355 or 385

The month Adar I is only present in leap years. In non-leap years Adar II is simply called "Adar."

Note that in a regular year the numbers 30 and 29 alternate; a complete year is created by adding a day to Heshvan, whereas a deficient year is created by removing a day from Kislev.

The alteration of 30 and 29 ensures that when the year starts with a new moon, so does each month.

What years are leap years?

A year is a leap year if the number year mod 19 is one of the following: 0, 3, 6, 8, 11, 14, or 17.

The value for year in this formula is the ‘Anno Mundi’ described below.

What years are deficient, regular, and complete?

That is the wrong question to ask. The correct question to ask is: When does a Jewish year begin? Once you have answered that question (see below), the length of the year is the number of days between 1 Tishri in one year and 1 Tishri in the following year.

When is New Year’s day?

That depends. Jews have several different days to choose from. The most important are:

1 Tishri: Rosh HaShanah. This day is a celebration of the creation of the world and marks the start of a new calendar year. This will be the day we shall base our calculations on in the following sections.

1 Nisan: New Year for Kings. This is also the start of the religious year. Nisan is considered the first month, although it occurs 6 or 7 months after the start of the calendar year.

When does a Jewish day begin?

Apples and Honey at Rosh Hashana.

The Jewish New Year begins on 1 Tishri, known as Rosh Hashana. Since medieval times, apples and honey have been served at celebratory meals to symbolize a sweet New Year.

When does a Jewish day begin?

A Jewish-calendar day does not begin at midnight, but at either sunset or when three medium-sized stars should be visible, depending on the religious circumstance.

Sunset marks the start of the 12 night hours, whereas sunrise marks the start of the 12 day hours. This means that night hours may be longer or shorter than day hours, depending on the season.

When does a Jewish year begin?

Sounding a Yemenite Shofar.

The shofar is used to announce the new moon, Rosh Hashana, and holidays. A shofar is made from the horn of an animal — typically a ram.

When does a Jewish year begin?

The first day of the calendar year, Rosh HaShanah, on 1 Tishri is determined as follows:

  • The new year starts on the day of the new moon that occurs about 354 days (or 384 days if the previous year was a leap year) after 1 Tishri of the previous year.
  • If the new moon occurs after noon on that day, delay the new year by one day. (Because in that case the new crescent moon will not be visible until the next day.)
  • If this would cause the new year to start on a Sunday, Wednesday, or Friday, delay it by one day. (Because we want to avoid that Yom Kippur (10 Tishri) falls on a Friday or Sunday, and that Hoshanah Rabba (21 Tishri) falls on a Sabbath (Saturday)).
  • If two consecutive years start 356 days apart (an illegal year length), delay the start of the first year by two days.
  • If two consecutive years start 382 days apart (an illegal year length), delay the start of the second year by one day.

Note: Rule 4 can only come into play if the first year was supposed to start on a Tuesday. Therefore a two day delay is used rather than a one day delay, as the year must not start on a Wednesday as stated in rule 3.

When is the new moon?

A calculated new moon is used. In order to understand the calculations, one must know that an hour is subdivided into 1080 ‘parts’.

The calculations are as follows:

The new moon that started the year AM 1, occurred 5 hours and 204 parts after sunset (i.e. just before midnight on Julian date 6 October 3761 B.C.E.).

The new moon of any particular year is calculated by extrapolating from this time, using a synodic month of 29 days 12 hours and 793 parts.

Note that 18:00 Jerusalem time (15:39 UTC) is used instead of sunset in all these calculations.

How does one count years?

Years are counted since the creation of the world, which is assumed to have taken place in the autumn of 3760 B.C.E. In that year, after less than a week belonging to AM 1, AM 2 started (AM = Anno Mundi = year of the world).

In the year C.E. 2006 we witnessed the start of Hebrew year AM 5767.

Источник: http://www.webexhibits.org/calendars/calendar-jewish.html

When is Purim 2021? Date, meaning behind the Jewish holiday and how it’s celebrated

When it comes to Jewish holidays, Purim is certainly one of the must beloved and most ostentatious.

It celebrates a Queen who thwarted the attempted genocide of her people many centuries ago, but despite its sombre beginnings it has evolved into a colourful feast of celebration.

But how will it be marked this year? Here’s everything you need to know.

What is Purim?

Purim is a Jewish holiday that incorporates dressing up in costume, and eating and drinking in celebration.

Ultra-orthodox Jewish men pray next to children wearing crowns ahead of the Jewish holiday of Purim, <i>when is the next jewish holiday</i> the Western Wall in Jerusalem's old city on February 23, 2021. (Photo by MENAHEM KAHANA / AFP) (Photo by MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP via Getty Images)

The festival commemorates the defeat of an attempted genocide of the Jews of the Persian Empire in fifth century BCE.

After a virtuous Jewish woman named Esther married King Ahasuerus of Persia, she and her Uncle Mordechai interrupted a plot by the king’s right-hand-man, Haman, who planed “to destroy, kill and annihilate all the Jews, young and old, infants and women, in a single day”.

At the eleventh hour, Esther revealed to the king that she was Jewish, meaning Haman’s plan would result in her death. The King instead sentenced his friend to be executed at the very gallows he’d prepared for the Jews.

When is Purim?

Purim is celebrated every year on the 14th of the Hebrew month of Adar (late winter/early spring).

This year Purim falls on the night of Thursday 25 February, into Friday 26 February.

How is it traditionally celebrated?

Purim is one of the more fun-loving holidays in the Jewish calendar where fancy dress is a must, with girls dressing up as Queen Esther, boys as King Ahasuerus and rabbis donning comedy hats.

The synagogue service involves a retelling of the Purim tale from the book of Esther where everyone theatrically hisses and makes noise when Haman’s name is mentioned.

Charity also plays a part and observers are expected to give money and food to those in need.

Parties are hosted across the community, with traditional food served including a filled biscuit known as Hamantaschen that is triangular shape when is the next jewish holiday meant to denote Haman’s hat.

What about this year?

Of course, Covid has hit every community.

A boy wearing a dress-up costume to mark the upcoming Jewish holiday of Purim, which is a celebration of the Jews' salvation from genocide in ancient Persia, walks on a sports court at his school in Jerusalem February 24, 2021. REUTERS/Ammar Awad

The UK’s Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis, has already warned against Jews gathering this Purim, saying “let us guarantee that we will celebrate safety”. when is the next jewish holiday year’s Purim will be mostly marked at home in when is the next jewish holiday, with more low-key celebrations, as well as virtual events.

Children will still be able to dress up at home, and some parents may incorporate the baking of traditional foods into their home-education this week.

But there is concern some of the most strictly Orthodox (Haredi) Jews may not adhere to the rules as prayer is still permitted in places of worship.

Purim last year is thought to have played a part in why the UK’s Jewish community was affected so badly so early. Data suggests deaths among British Jews were 3.7 times higher than average in April 2020.

The holiday took place just a few weeks before lockdown was brought in, and featured poorly-ventilated rooms full of people crammed together.

Источник: https://inews.co.uk/news/uk/purim-2021-when-date-what-meaning-jewish-holiday-celebrations-story-885621

Over the next few weeks, members of the Jewish faith will observe the High Holy Days in the month of Tishrei in the Jewish calendar, usually in September and October. These holidays commemorate concepts such as renewal, forgiveness, freedom and joy.

As a scholar of the Bible and the ancient world, I am continually impressed with how the history of these festivals offers consolation and encourages people toward living well, even during a pandemic.

What are the High Holy Days?

Of www myonlineaccount net login two main High Holy Days, also called the High Holidays, the first is Rosh Hashanah, or the New Year celebration. It is one of two new year celebrations in the Jewish faith, the other being Passover in the spring.

The second High Holiday is Yom Kippur, or the Day of Atonement.

In addition to the main Holy Days, there are other celebrations that occur as part of the festival season. One is Sukkot, or the Festival of the Booths, during which meals and rituals take place in a “sukkah,” or a makeshift structure constructed with a tree-branch roof.

The second entails twocelebrations, which in some traditions are part of the same holiday and in others occur on two separate, consecutive days: Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah.

Shemini Atzeret is Hebrew for “eighth (day of) assembly,” counting eight days from Sukkot. Simchat Torah is Hebrew for “joy/rejoicing of the Torah” – the Torah being the first five books of the Bible, from Genesis to Deuteronomy, believed to have been revealed to Moses.

Of particular interest for the High Holy Days in 2021 is that Rosh Hashanah also begins a yearlong observance known as the “Shmita.”

Commemorated once every seven years, the term comes from a Hebrew phrase that appears in the Bible in a number of passages. Some of these passages command that the farmer “drops” or “releases” his crops. Another verse associates the act with the forgiveness of debts. In another passage in the Bible, the Shmita is connected with the reading of God’s revelation in the law.

The exact nature of the action denoted by Shmita is debated, but the idea is that some portion of the food is left behind for the poor and hungry in society.

In this manner, the beginning of the High Holy Days in 2021 is a reminder to care for those who have been struggling.

Why celebrate these festivals?

The origins and reasons for the High Holy Days are in some fashion encoded in the Bible and in the agrarian and religious culture that produced it. The millennia of Jewish tradition between the Bible and the present has informed many of the celebrations as well, in ways that go beyond the biblical texts.

The first holiday, Rosh Hashanah, celebrates renewal. It involves the blowing of the shofar horn, itself connected to the ram sacrificed instead of Abraham’s son, as God had commanded Abraham to do. Important activities include attending synagogue to hear the shofar, as well as eating apple slices with honey, the former representing hopes for fruitfulness and the honey symbolizing the desire for a sweet year.

View of theTorah at a synagogue.

It also often involves a ritual of throwing bread onto running water, called a tashlich, symbolizing the removal of sins from people.

Rosh Hashanah is believed to mark the date of the creation of the world, and it begins the “Days of Awe,” a 10-day period culminating in Yom Kippur.

The term “Days of Awe” itself is a more literal translation of the Hebrew phrasing used for the High Holy Days.

Concepts of repentance and forgiveness are particularly highlighted in Yom Kippur. Its origins are found in the Hebrew Bible, where it describes the one day a year in which premeditated, intentional sins, such as willfully violating divine commands and prohibitions, were forgiven.

Intentional sins were envisioned as generating impurity in the when is the next jewish holiday of the temple in Jerusalem, where God was thought to live. Impurity from intentional sins was believed by Israelites to be a threat to this divine presence since God might choose to leave the temple.

The biblical description of Yom Kippur involved a series of sacrifices and rituals designed to remove sin from the people. For example, one goat was thought to bear the sins of the Israelites and was sent off to the wilderness, where it was consumed by Azazel, a mysterious, perhaps demonic force. Azazel consumed the goat and the sins that it carried. The term “scapegoat” in English derives from this act.

Yom Kippur is both the holiest day of the Jewish calendar and also one of the most somber, as the time for repentance when is the next jewish holiday fasting and prayer.

Sukkot, Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah

The Festival of Sukkot likely began as an agricultural celebration, and the booths were shelters in which farmers stayed during the collection of grain, which was to be processed for the year.

Vestiges of this agricultural commemoration appear in certain passages in the Bible, one of which indicates that the festival is to last seven days to mark the time period in which Israelites dwelt in booths, or makeshift dwellings with branches, when leaving Egypt.

This feast was known as zeman simchatenu, or “the time of our rejoicing,” hearkening to the themes of gratitude, freedom from Egypt and the reading of When is the next jewish holiday revelation as found in the Torah to all Israel.

Such a time of rejoicing contrasts with the somber repentance and fasting that feature in Yom Kippur. So vital was the Festival of Booths that it is also known as simply “the chag,” or “the feast,” a word related to the more familiar hajj pilgrimage in Islam.

This period of seven days ends with Shemini Atzeret on the eighth day, both a connected celebration capping off Sukkot and a festival in its own right.

The annual reading of the Torah ends with the final text of Deuteronomy. The beginning of the next annual reading cycle, starting with the first book Genesis, is also celebrated. This act of beginning a new year of reading the Bible is commemorated in the festival called Simchat Torah.

The observance of Simchat Torah was a later innovation, described already in the fifth century or so but not formalized or identified by this name until the medieval period.

Why do they matter?

Religious calendars and festivals can force people to encounter certain ideas in the year. For example, they can enable them to face the more difficult dynamics of life like repentance and forgiveness, providing avenues to reflect on the events of the past year and to find courage to live differently in the next year where needed.

In this manner, structuring the celebration of the new year around remembrances of a variety of human experiences, both sorrow and joy, entails a profound recognition of the complexity of relationships and experiences in life.

In particular, the High Holy Days – as illustrated in the renewal of Rosh Hashanah, the somber reflection of Yom Kippur – as well as the joyous celebrations in Sukkot and Simchat Torah, offer a means to remember that time is itself healing and restorative.

As such, the High Holy Days and the holiday season in Tishrei help to mark the year in meaningful ways and to highlight our moral responsibility toward one another.

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Источник: https://theconversation.com/what-are-the-jewish-high-holy-days-a-look-at-rosh-hashanah-yom-kippur-and-a-month-of-celebrating-renewal-and-moral-responsibility-166079

Yom Kippur 2021: When is the holy Jewish festival and what is its significance?

The Jewish festival of Yom Kippur is perceived as the holiest day of the year in Judaism.

Taking place just over a week after the Jewish New Year, the festival is commemorated with a day-long fast.

The aim of the fast is to encourage Jewish people to reflect on their past year, repent for any wrongdoings and wish for a happy and healthy year ahead.

Here is everything you need to know about Yom Kippur:

When is it?

This year, Yom Kippur starts during the evening of Wednesday 15 September and ends during the evening of Thursday 16 September.

The fast, which is observed for approximately 25 hours, starts at 7.01pm and ends at 8pm the following day.

On the Jewish lunisolar calendar, Yom Kippur begins on the ninth day of the month of Tishrei and ends on the tenth day.

Tishrei is the first month of the civil year and the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year, according to the Jewish calendar.

It occurs at the end of the "10 Days of Repentance", a period that begins with the celebration of the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah.

What is its significance?

In Hebrew, "Yom" means "day" and "Kippur" means "to atone", which is why the observance is often referred to as the "Day of Atonement".

The day of repentance is marked with an annual fast, which commences and ends with a feast.

"Fasting is an opportunity for each of us to observe Yom Kippur in a most personal way," states Jewish education site My Jewish Learning.

The shofar, an ancient musical instrument, is blown in synagogue on Yom Kippur

"Fasting on Yom Kippur provides the key to our inner awakening."

According to Jewish belief, on Rosh Hashanah, Hashem (God) writes every person's name into special books, the "righteous" being written into the Book of Life and the "evil" being written into the Book of Death.

It is believed the names are written into the books on a temporary basis, with God giving his final judgement on Yom Kippur.

"In actuality, the vast majority of us are neither totally good or bad. We're more like 50/50, so we have a few more days until Yom Kippur to tip the scales," states a rabbi for Jewish organisation Aish.

How is it commemorated?

On Yom Kippur, Jewish people go to synagogue to hear and partake in prayer services.

The beginning of Yom Kippur is marked with the recital of a prayer service called Kol Nidre, which takes place at sundown on the eve of the festival.

"Ironically, it is not really a prayer at all, but rather a statement. A statement that deals with promises, vows and other sorts of verbal commitments commonly made in the course of the year," Orthodox Jewish organisation Chabad states.

On a typical day at synagogue, three prayer services are held.

However, on the Day of Atonement, an additional two prayer services are recited.

During the services, special passages are read from the Torah and "Vidui" – confessions – are chanted.

A special memorial prayer called "Yizkor" is also recited in synagogue on Yom Kippur.

The prayer is observed in memory of relatives and friends who have passed away.

When Jewish people go to synagogue on the day of the observance, it is customary to wear white, as a symbol of atonement and purity.

Those who are devout may also refrain from partaking in activities such as using electricity, driving, washing or wearing leather.

The end of the fast is marked by the blowing of the shofar, an ancient musical instrument typically made from a ram's horn.

The shofar is also blown on Rosh Hashanah and on every morning of the month of Elul, which precedes the Jewish New Year.

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Источник: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/yom-kippur-2021-meaning-greeting-b1921376.html

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