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Secretary of state south dakota election results


secretary of state south dakota election results

South Pacific Commission ------ 1205 Davies, Rodger P 1119 Spanish - speaking Americans ----- 1086, Election results, 1974. 2020 Primary Election · Date: June 2, 2020 · Time: 7 AM to 7 PM CST · Voter Registration Deadline: May 18, 2020 at 5 PM · Absentee Voting Available. The Finance Officer is the Election Official for North Sioux City's municipal elections. You may contact City Hall or the County Auditor's office with any.
secretary of state south dakota election results

Secretary of state south dakota election results -

Virginia GOP completes sweep of elections with state House win

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. — A three-judge panel overseeing a recount in a close Virginia Beach state House race upheld the Republican candidate’s victory on Friday, a decision that also reaffirms the GOP’s takeover of the chamber and completes the party’s sweep of last month’s elections.

Republicans also claimed the statewide offices of governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general in the Nov. 2 election. Those wins were a dramatic turnaround in a state where the GOP had not won a statewide race since 2009.

The certified results from the election showed Republicans leading in 52 districts and the Democrats leading in 48. The recount in the 85th District race resulted in Democratic incumbent Alex Askew gaining 12 votes, but he still trailed Republican challenger Karen Greenhalgh by 115 votes. There was one contested ballot. The panel found that the intent of the voter was unclear, so that ballot was not counted for either candidate.

After Democrats requested recounts in two races with razor-thin margins, that left open the remote possibility of a 50-50 split.

Though the second recount, in the 91st District, is still expected to proceed next week, Democrats no longer have a shot at undoing the GOP’s majority. Askew is an incumbent freshmen first elected in 2019, when Democrats flipped both the House and Senate.

Republicans — who won 52 districts, according to the certified results — had said they were confident their candidates’ leads would hold.

Throughout the day Thursday and into Friday, people packed into a room in the second floor of an elections building in Virginia Beach as the ballots from the 85th District were fed into the two scanning machines. Groups of people sat at tables and scrutinized any ballots that were determined by the machines to have write-in candidates, were not clearly marked or had some other issue.

Источник: https://money.yahoo.com/virginia-gop-completes-sweep-elections-174802102.html

Biden’s Summit for Democracy: US and India need to look within

Unless these two leading democracies are willing to face the threats to democracy coming from within, the Summit will ring hollow.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been invited by President Joe Biden to participate in the 9-10 December 2021 Summit for Democracy. President Biden envisages this Summit as a centerpiece for placing democracy at the forefront of values guiding US foreign policy, and he would like democracy to be at the forefront of foreign policies around the globe. Indications are that PM Modi will attend this virtual gathering. As the largest democracy in the world, India’s positive participation is vital for the success of the Summit.
The main purpose of the Summit for Democracy is to serve as a counterweight to the perceived success of the Chinese authoritarian model. India is held out as a rebuttal to Chinese assertions that liberal democracy cannot work for a large developing nation. A credible Indian alternative to the Chinese model is more important now than ever if the decline in democracy throughout the developing world is to be arrested. As the US and India become more cooperative in standing up to authoritarian China, their effectiveness will be enhanced by strengthening their democracies at home as well as those outside their borders.
The chief themes of the Summit are: 1. “defending against authoritarianism”; 2. “addressing and fighting corruption”; and 3. “advancing respect for human rights”. According to the White House, the Summit will galvanize commitments and initiatives concerning these themes. Following a year of consultation, coordination, and action after the Summit, President Biden will invite world leaders to gather once more to showcase progress made against their commitments.
The themes of the Summit are often thought of in terms of defending democracy against international threats. Especially after the collapse of US efforts in developing nations as diverse as Afghanistan, Iraq and Vietnam, the question of how to defend democracy internationally is important. However, major threats to democracy are arising internally in both the United States and India. Unless these two leading democracies are willing to face these threats, the Summit will ring hollow.
Free and fair elections respected by both winners and losers are vital to “defending against authoritarianism”. India has done a remarkable job through its non-partisan Election Commission of assuring the openness and integrity of its elections. So much so that each time India conducts national elections it is the largest organized activity ever undertaken by mankind and the results are universally respected.
The United States, by contrast, has suffered repeatedly from assaults on its electoral systems. Since 2020, the losing candidate for President has mounted an unprecedented attempt to overthrow election results and undermine faith in elections. Some US political leaders are now contemplating the possibilities for overturning elections by legislative action at the state or national level. These developments constitute the continuing threat of authoritarianism. The US can learn from India on this issue, and both countries can make commitments at the Summit to promote and defend the rights of citizens to participate in free and fair elections and uphold the sanctity of election results.
The United States and India both have an interest in “addressing and fighting corruption” as a major means of defending democracy. The recent trove of 11.9 million financial records obtained by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and known as the “Pandora papers” shows how serious democracy-threatening corruption is in both India and the United States. Over 300 wealthy Indians are shown as participating in schemes to hide money, while US states like South Dakota and Delaware are shown to be integral to such schemes. “Black money” in combination with non-transparent political contributions threaten democratic political systems. Both the US and India can commit to programs to fight these threats to democracy.
Democracies capable of countering authoritarianism must have systems and programs for “advancing respect for human rights”. Unchecked rule by the majority does not constitute democracy. Unless human rights are protected for all, democracy simply becomes the authoritarianism of the majority. Both the United States and India have grave flaws in their respect for human rights. In the United States, the murders of George Floyd and other African Americans by police have highlighted the problems of the American criminal justice system. In India, the attacks on Muslims and other minorities show there is much to be done in advancing respect for human rights. Both countries can make renewed commitments in the area of human rights.
Addressing internal threats to democracy are difficult because these threats are so intimately bound up with domestic politics. But addressing these threats is necessary if the Summit for Democracy is to be more than a propaganda exercise. Both the United States and India should be willing to identify flaws in their systems and set forth commitments that will help make more perfect unions in both countries.
Raymond E. Vickery, Jr. is Senior Associate, Wadhwani Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies; Senior Advisor, Albright Stonebridge Group; former US Assistant Secretary of Commerce.

Источник: https://www.sundayguardianlive.com/opinion/bidens-summit-democracy-us-india-need-look-within

Distribution of Electoral Votes

Allocation among the States

Electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census. Every State is allocated a number of votes equal to the number of senators and representatives in its U.S. Congressional delegation—two votes for its senators in the U.S. Senate plus a number of votes equal to the number of its Congressional districts.

Under the 23rd Amendment of the Constitution, the District of Columbia is allocated three electors and treated like a State for purposes of the Electoral College.

Each State (which includes the District of Columbia for this discussion) decides how to appoint its electors. Currently all States use the popular vote results from the November general election to decide which political party chooses the individuals who are appointed. 

 

Allocation within each State

All States, except for Maine and Nebraska have a winner-take-all policy where the State looks only at the overall winner of the state-wide popular vote.  Maine and Nebraska, however, appoint individual electors based on the winner of the popular vote for each Congressional district and then 2 electors based on the winner of the overall state-wide popular vote. 

Even though Maine and Nebraska don't use a winner-take-all system, it is rare for either State to have a split vote.  Each has done so once: Nebraska in 2008 and Maine in 2016.

 

Current allocations

The allocations below are based on the 2010 Census. They are effective for the 2012, 2016, and 2020 presidential elections.

Total Electoral Votes:  538;   Majority Needed to Elect:  270

Alabama - 9 votes

Kentucky - 8 votes

North Dakota - 3 votes

Alaska - 3 votes

Louisiana - 8 votes

Ohio - 18 votes

Arizona - 11 votes

Maine - 4 votes

Oklahoma - 7 votes

Arkansas - 6 votes

Maryland - 10 votes

Oregon - 7 votes

California - 55 votes

Massachusetts - 11 votes

Pennsylvania - 20 votes

Colorado - 9 votes

Michigan - 16 votes

Rhode Island - 4 votes

Connecticut - 7 votes

Minnesota - 10 votes

South Carolina - 9 votes

Delaware - 3 votes

Mississippi - 6 votes

South Dakota - 3 votes

District of Columbia - 3 votes

Missouri - 10 votes

Tennessee - 11 votes

Florida - 29 votes

Montana - 3 votes

Texas - 38 votes

Georgia - 16 votes

Nebraska - 5 votes

Utah - 6 votes

Hawaii - 4 votes

Nevada - 6 votes

Vermont - 3 votes

Idaho - 4 votes

New Hampshire - 4 votes

Virginia - 13 votes

Illinois - 20 votes

New Jersey - 14 votes

Washington - 12 votes

Indiana - 11 votes

New Mexico - 5 votes

West Virginia - 5 votes

Iowa - 6 votes

New York - 29 votes

Wisconsin - 10 votes

Kansas - 6 votes

North Carolina - 15 votes

Wyoming - 3 votes

 

Источник: https://www.archives.gov/electoral-college/allocation

Will any Republicans challenge Trump in 2024? DeSantis, Pence and the other top contenders to know


WASHINGTON – Many Republicans are spending the holidays planning for the congressional and gubernatorial elections of 2022 – especially Donald Trump and other Republicans who are thinking of running for president in 2024.

The midterm elections are still more than 11 months away, but the Republican presidential race of early 2024 is well underway, a unique behind-the-scenes contest involving more than a dozen potential candidates and being conducted in the giant shadow of a volatile ex-president named Trump.

While still protesting his loss to President Joe Biden in 2020, Trump plans to campaign for allies and against enemies in 2022. He is also giving out broad hints he may seek the presidency again in 2024 – and the longer he waits to announce, the more others will think about jumping in.

At least ten other Republicans are making the kinds of moves presidential aspirants make:  high-profile speeches, book tours, political organizations, media interviews and visits to early delegate selection states like Iowa and New Hampshire.

But there is also one thing they are avoiding: Nearly all of the prospective candidates have declined to say whether they will challenge Trump directly should he decide to run.

Like most political professionals, they are waiting to see what happens.

"I don't know that he's going to run," former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie told CNN. "I don't know whether I'm going to run."

The list of possible non-Trump candidates includes former aides and advisers (such as Mike Pence, Christie, Mike Pompeo and Nikki Haley); a sprinkling of GOP governors (Ron DeSantis, Kristi Noem and Chris Sununu, among others), and some Republican senators (including Tom Cotton and Ted Cruz).

More: In a hypothetical 2024 match, Donald Trump leads Joe Biden by double digits in Iowa Poll

Related: Gloomy landscape for Democrats in midterms as Biden's approval drops to 38% in USA TODAY/Suffolk poll

All would be underdogs to Trump, who leads early Republican polling ahead of 2024.

"You get a lot of people who want Trump to run again," said Sarah Longwell, an anti-Trump Republican strategist who is conducting a series of focus groups of GOP voters. "If Trump runs, he freezes the field for most of these candidates, and they don't run."

And how many candidates will there be if Trump doesn't run?

"So many," Longwell said. "A wide open field."

Former VP Mike Pence

Former Vice President Mike Pence has been perhaps the most active non-Trump candidate – despite his historic falling out with Trump.

Pence refused Trump's demands that he toss out Biden electoral votes in certain states as Congress certified the 2020 election, the event that triggered the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

Despite continuing criticism from Trump and allies, Pence has set up an issue advocacy organization – Advancing American Freedom – and given speeches in places like Iowa and South Carolina.

Pence has a busy holiday season. Next week, he delivers a speech on his opposition to abortion, one day before the U.S. Supreme Court holds a hearing on the subject. On Dec. 8, he has two events scheduled: a speech criticizing Biden's economic plans and another speech at a state Republican Party fundraiser in ... New Hampshire.

When an audience member in Iowa asked Pence who persuaded him to "buck" Trump over the vote certification, Pence responded that it was "James Madison ... father of the Constitution."

Former N.J. Gov. Chris Christie

Christie, the former New Jersey governor as well as occasional Trump adviser, is promoting his presidential ambitions through a tried-and-true tactic: the book tour.

In interviews for his book – "Republican Rescue: Saving the Party from Truth Deniers, Conspiracy Theorists, and the Dangerous Policies of Joe Biden" – Christie has criticized Trump for his false claims about "voter fraud" in 2020.

Christie, who was the first 2016 presidential candidate to endorse Trump after dropping out, has given mixed signals about whether he run against the ex-president. "Let's see who he is and what he says and how he conducts himself," Christie told CNN.

He also said: "In 2021, the idea of making predictions for 2024 is folly."

More: Mike Pence looks at the 2024 presidential race but sees Donald Trump everywhere

Related: Chris Christie writes Mike Pence was stunned on election night – and other not-so-flattering things in his new book

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

Mike Pompeo served as Trump's secretary of state. The former congressman from Kansas has set up a political action committee – "Champion American Values" – to help conservative candidates in 2022 and beyond.

Next year's elections are his focus, Pompeo told radio station KCCI during a September visit to Iowa, and then "we'll turn our attention to the next election after that."

Like other quasi-candidates, however, Pompeo has been meeting with donors and talking like a candidate.

As far back as March, when Fox News host Sean Hannity asked if he would run for president if Trump didn't, Pompeo said: "I'm always up for a good fight ... I care deeply about the American conservative movement for an awfully long time now. I aim to keep at it."

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is probably the most prominent of the Republican governors who are pondering presidential bids. The former congressman has been particularly vocal about the COVID pandemic, working against the Biden administration's requirements for masks and vaccinations. He has also echoed Trump's calls for "election integrity."

DeSantis has also downplayed 2024 speculation for a very important reason: He's up for re-election in 2022 in a state that remains closely divided. DeSantis won the 2018 governor's race by less than 1 percentage point.

The publicity surrounding DeSantis' performance as governor has made him perhaps the most high-profile non-Trump candidate. The Florida governor scores well in presidential polls, though he and his aides have discouraged talk about 2024 because of his re-election battle in 2022.

"I’m not considering anything beyond doing my job," DeSantis told Fox News host Sean Hannity recently.

DeSantis' rise in the polls has triggered blowback from Trump and his allies. In an October interview with Yahoo Finance, Trump predicted that most GOP candidates would drop out if he runs, including DeSantis.

“If I faced him, I'd beat him like I would beat everyone else,” Trump said.

Former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley

Nikki Haley, the former South Carolina governor who served as Trump's ambassador to the United Nations, has given mixed signals about Trump and her own prospective candidacy.

In April, Haley told the Associated Press that "I would not run if President Trump ran, and I would talk to him about it,” In October, she told The Wall Street Journal she would consult with Trump when the time comes: “I would talk to him and see what his plans are. I would tell him about my plans. We would work on it together.” 

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem represents a small state but has demonstrated big ambitions.

Noem spoke at a pair of Conservative Political Action Conference meetings this year and has taken swipes at DeSantis and other potential rivals over their commitments to keep states open during the COVID pandemic.

The governor also faces re-election next year and has been subjected to criticism within the state. That includes allegations – denied by Noem – that she inappropriately helped her daughter obtain a real estate appraisal license.

N.H. Gov. Chris Sununu

The latest governor to enter the 2024 speculation pool is Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.

Sununu surprised Republicans across the country this month by announcing he would not run for the U.S. Senate and adding that he hasn't "ruled out going to Washington" in the future in a "management" position.

While forgoing a Senate race, Sununu has also criticized congressional Republicans for infighting – "I just think they have their priorities screwed up," he told CNN's "State of the Union – and suggested governors like himself should be the new party leaders.

As for the 2024 presidential race, Sununu did not deny interest. "People have asked me about that," he told CNN, but first he must win election to another gubernatorial term in 2022. "We will see what the future brings," Sununu said.

More: If Donald Trump faces criminal charges, analysts doubt it will hurt him with his base in 2024

Related: Budding rivalry pits Greg Abbott against Ron DeSantis in race to the right

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott

Some Republicans have hopes for other GOP governors, includingGreg Abbottof Texas, who has pushed conservative legislation on abortion and voting rights.

Abbott first faces re-election next year, including a Republican primary with at least two vocal conservative challengers. The governor does enjoy the endorsement of Trump himself.

Regarding the 2024 race, Abbott echoes Trump and many other Republican aspirants in saying he'll have to wait and see, a message he has been delivering for more than a year.

“You know, one thing that you know about me, I take one step at a time,” Abbott told talk show host Mark Davis on KSKY-AM in Dallas a year ago. “The first step is to win re-election and after that, Mark, we’ll see what happens.”

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan

If Hogan takes the plunge, he would be a rare Republican candidate: A Trump critic. Hogan has often criticized Trump for his attacks on fellow Republicans, a group that includes the Maryland governor himself.

Hogan is also the rare Republican who says he wouldn't mind challenging Trump directly should both decide to make bids.

“If I decide that I want to run for president, it certainly wouldn’t stop me that he’s in the race, that’s for sure,” Hogan told Politico.

Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas

Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas has been busy giving speeches, endorsing candidates and recruiting people for what looks like a presidential campaign operation, be it for 2024 or beyond.

During a September visit to Iowa, where he campaigned for local candidates, Cotton told Fox News he didn't want to speculate on "far off" elections, but is focused on GOP efforts to win back Congress.

"Those races and further off from that will work themselves out when we get there," Cotton said.

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, the last Republican candidate to drop out in 2016 before Trump claimed the nomination, has also said he is waiting to see how things play out.

A lot depends on Trump, he said.

During an appearance on CBS' Face The Nation, Cruz said "I have no idea what's going to happen in 2024," and added that Trump "is going to have to make a choice, first of all, whether he's going to run or not. I think if he chose to run, he would be very, very formidable."

The Texas conservative added that, "I can tell you that when I ran in 2016, we came incredibly close. I came in second. There's a long history of runner-ups becoming the next nominee."

Other potential GOP hopefuls: Rubio, Hawley, Tim Scott

Republicans are also talking up potential candidacies of other senators, including Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, a 2016 candidate who recently made a trip to Iowa; Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, who backed Trump's election protest right before the Jan. 6 insurrection; and Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, the party's highest-ranking Black lawmaker.

At least one House Republican is also in the speculative mix: Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming.

One of ten House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump over the Jan. 6 riot, Cheney is being challenged in a Republican primary by a Trump-backed candidate. As she campaigns for her job, Cheney is giving national speeches on the need for the GOP to move past Trump.

More: Liz Cheney's anti-Trump crusade will end her career or make her a White House contender

Will He or Won't He?  

Not all of these candidates will wind up running, of course, and probably no more than half will ever take the plunge. Many of the non-Trump candidates are more likely seeking the vice presidential slot.

All of these quasi-candidates will be affected by Trump, who remains the party's most popular politician.

Also its most contentious.

A recent nationwide Marquette Law School poll found that 60% of Republicans want Trump to run for president again – and 40% of GOP members do not want him to run again.

The difference is stark among all potential voters – only 28% of respondents want to see Trump make another run for president, while 71% do not want to see him make another campaign.

While Trump is probably the favorite for the Republican nomination right now, analysts said a lot can change before primary votes are cast in early 2024.

For one thing, Trump is under investigation by prosecutors in New York for various financial dealings and in Georgia over efforts to pressure state officials into changing election results.

Some of the Republicans who don't want Trump to run again note that he lost the popular vote in two straight elections. Trump also lost the Electoral College to Biden in 2020, but many Republicans down the ballot out-polled him.

"My guess is that there are a bunch of people who want to vote Republican but simply won't if Trump is the nominee," Republican strategist Scott Jennings said.

That said, it looks right now that any non-Trump challenger would have a hard time defeating the ex-president.

"At the present I don't think any would stand much of a chance," Jennings said. "But there's a long way to go between now and then."

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/11/26/2024-presidential-election-republicans-who-could-challenge-trump/8723353002/

South Dakota State Office

Welcome to the South Dakota State Farm Service Agency!

Our primary mission is to help South Dakota's farmers and ranchers secure the highest possible financial assistance from USDA programs and play a vital role to the economic survival of South Dakota's rural communities.

South Dakota FSA is proud to continue its strong tradition of providing customer-based service to South Dakota's producers. Please feel free to contact your local county office (USDA Service Center Locator) or our state office in Huron.


South Dakota State Committee

The Farm Service Agency State Committee in South Dakota reviews state and county operations by making decisions on how programs are applied on a state-wide basis. Appeals of County Committee decisions are heard at the state committee level. 


Spotlight

Subscribe to our Updates

Farmers.gov/subscribe

Receive email and text message alerts from USDA’s NRCS, FSA and RMA while on-the-go, in the field or on the tractor. Updates include deadline reminders, conservation initiatives, disaster assistance, crop insurance and more. Visit farmers.gov/subscribe.

Pandemic Response and Safety Grants

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) published a Request for Applications (RFAs) for the Pandemic Response and Safety (PRS) Grants program. This grant program will provide assistance to small businesses in certain commodity areas, including small scale specialty crop producers, food processors, manufacturers, distributors and farmers markets. Small businesses and nonprofits can apply for a grant to cover COVID-related expenses such as workplace safety measures, retrofitting facilities for worker and consumer safety, shifting to online sales platforms, transportation, worker housing, and medical costs. The minimum funding request is $1,500 and the maximum funding request is $20,000.

Eligible entities should visit the PRS grant portal at usda-prs.grantsolutions.gov for complete information on the program, including how to obtain a free of charge DUNS Number from Dun & Bradstreet (D&B) before applying for this program. Applications must be submitted electronically through the grant portal by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, November 22, 2021.

2021 Farm Service Agency County Committee Elections Underway

USDA began mailing ballots the week of Nov. 1 for FSA county and urban county committee elections to all eligible agricultural producers and private landowners across the country. Elections are occurring in certain Local Administrative Areas (LAA).

To be counted, producers and landowners must return ballots to the local FSA county office or have postmarked by Dec. 6, 2021. County committees are unique to FSA and serve as a direct link between agricultural communities across the country and USDA. For more information on FSA county committees, visit fsa.usda.gov/elections.

Organic and Transitional Education and Certification Program

USDA’s Organic and Transitional Education and Certification Program (OTECP) helps to cover certification and education expenses for agricultural producers who are certified organic or transitioning to organic. Certified operations and transitional operations may apply for OTECP for eligible expenses paid during the 2020 and 2021 program years and the program will continue into 2022. Eligible expenses include certification expenses, registration fees for educational events and soil testing as required by the National Organic Program.

Signup for OTECP for 2020 and 2021 is Nov. 8, 2021 through Jan. 7, 2022. Learn more at farmers.gov/otecp.

USDA Provides $1.8 Billion to Offset Market Fluctuations

Agricultural producers who enrolled in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs for the 2020 crop year are receiving $1.8 billion, providing critical support to help mitigate fluctuations in either revenue or prices for certain crops.

FSA is also encouraging producers to contact their local USDA Service Centers to make or change elections and to enroll for 2022, providing future protections against market fluctuations. The election and enrollment period opened on Oct. 18, 2021 and runs through March 15, 2022. 

Ask the Expert: Understanding the U.S. Drought Monitor; a Q&A with Brian Fuchs

In this Ask the Expert, climatologist Brian Fuchs answers questions about the U.S. Drought Monitor and how it relates to USDA and supports agricultural producers. Brian is part of the team at the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln that manages the drought map. The drought monitor is an online, weekly map showing the extent and severity of drought across the United States.

Learn more about the U.S. Drought Monitor.

Источник: https://www.fsa.usda.gov/state-offices/South-Dakota/index

AP News Digest 6 p.m.

Here are the AP’s latest coverage plans, top stories and promotable content. All times EST. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at https://newsroom.ap.org.

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NEW/DEVELOPING

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Adds: SUPREME COURT; CHRISTMAS PARADE-SUV; ELECTION 2020-TRUMP LAWYERS; WATER-INFRASTRUCTURE; CYBERSECURITY-TRANSPORTATION-REGULATIONS; INDIGENOUS-GAMERS; VIRUS OUTBREAK-SOUTH AFRICA; INFANT DEATH-SENTENCING; MEXICO-US-ELECTRIC CARS; CHINA-PENG-SHUAI-WTA-FALLOUT; ART BASEL-MIAMI; BEVERLY HILLS-SHOOTING; US-ABORTION-TENNESSEE; FEDERAL PRISONS; INCAPACITATED WOMAN-SEXUAL ASSAULT.

SUPREME COURT-ABORTION-CONGRESS, listed on the 6 p.m. digest, will not move this cycle.

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ONLY ON AP

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AWOL-WEAPONS-EXPLOSIVES — An Associated Press investigation has found that the U.S. military has a missing explosives problem. Hundreds of pounds of plastic explosives have vanished over the past decade, as have hundreds — and possibly thousands — of armor-piercing grenades. They came from military bases and shipments. Troops falsified records to cover up some thefts, and in other cases didn’t report explosives as missing. The consequences can be deadly. By Kristin M. Hall, Justin Pritchard and James LaPorta. SENT: 2,200 words, photos, graphics. An abridged version of 1,100 words has also been sent. WITH: AWOL WEAPONS-EXPLOSIVES-TAKEAWAYS — Takeaways from an Associated Press investigation. SENT: 535 words, photos.

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TOP STORIES

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VIRUS-OUTBREAK-US — While all eyes are on the new and little-understood omicron variant, the delta form of the coronavirus isn’t finished wreaking havoc in the U.S., sending record numbers of patients to the hospital in some states, especially in the Midwest and New England. The U.S. recorded its first known omicron infection on Wednesday, in a fully vaccinated person who had returned to California from South Africa, where the variant was first identified just over a week ago. By Heather Hollingsworth. SENT: 950 words, photos.

VIRUS-OUTBREAK —Governments around the world are weighing new measures for populations tired of hearing about restrictions and vaccines as the coronavirus delta variant of COVID-19 pushes up cases in Europe and fears grow over the omicron variant. Greeks who are over age 60 and refuse vaccinations could be hit with monthly fines. In Israel, the government halted the use of a controversial phone tracking technology to trace possible cases of the new coronavirus variant after a public uproar. By Lori Hinnant. SENT: 1,185 words, photos.

SUPREME COURT — We’ve been here before, with the fate of abortion rights throughout the United States in doubt awaiting a decision by the Supreme Court But today’s court is much different. By Mark Sherman and Jessica Gresko. SENT: 770 words, photos.

SUPREME COURT-ABORTION-TEXAS — Texas offers a glimpse in real time of what would be a striking new landscape if the Supreme Court drastically curtails abortion rights: GOP-controlled states with almost no access to abortion, and women traveling hundreds of miles to get one. By Paul J. Weber and Mark Sherman. SENT: 870 words, photos.

ASYLUM-WAITING IN MEXICO — Migrants seeking to enter the United States will again have to stay in Mexico as they await immigration hearings, as the Biden administration reluctantly announces plans to comply with a court order and accept conditions set out by Mexico for resuming the Trump-era policy. By Elliot Spagat. SENT: 980 words, photos.

YE-DEATHS — They both carved out sterling reputations as military and political leaders over years of public service. But both also saw their legacies tarnished by their roles in the long, bloody war in Iraq. Former Secretary of State Colin Powell and former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld are among the many noteworthy people who died in 2021. Also among those who died this year was a man who for years held the title of baseball’s home run king. Hank Aaron, who died in January, endured racist threats on his path to breaking Babe Ruth’s record and is still considered one of the game’s greatest players. By Bernard McGhee. SENT: 6,940 words, photos.

MED--AUTISM RATES — New government autism numbers suggest more U.S. children are being diagnosed with the developmental condition and at younger ages. In an analysis of 2018 data, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers found that among 8-year-olds, 1 in 44 had been diagnosed with autism. That compares with 1 in 54 kids identified with autism in 2016, which CDC reported last year. The CDC said that children were 50% more likely to be diagnosed with autism by age 4 in 2018 than in 2014. By Lindsey Tanner. SENT: 400 words, photos.

SUPPLY-SHORTAGE-NEXT-BEST-THING -- The holidays have always been defined by disappointing out-of-stock messages on the most popular items. But the pandemic-induced supply chain snarls have created unprecedented shortages across all types of products. That has many customers buying early as shortfalls are only expected to worsen as the holiday season moves into the final stretch. By Anne D’Innocenzio. SENT: 920 words, photos.

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TRENDING NEWS

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CHRISTMAS PARADE-SUV — Milwaukee County’s top prosecutor says a young assistant in his office sought $1,000 bail for a man accused of driving through a Christmas parade because she was overworked and never saw his risk assessment. SENT: 750 words, photo.

ELECTION 2020-TRUMP LAWYERS — A judge has ordered nine lawyers allied with former President Donald Trump to pay Detroit and Michigan a total of $175,000 in sanctions for abusing the court system with a sham lawsuit challenging the 2020 election results. SENT: 170 words.

ART BASEL-MIAMI — The official Art Basel show is back in Miami with all its eccentric glory, a dizzying list of celebrity attendees and dozens of spin-off shows already generating buzz, including a 10-year-old child painter and a $4 million Banksy sale. SENT: 560 words, photos.

BEVERLY HILLS-SHOOTING — A 29-year-old man has been arrested in connection with the fatal shooting of Jacqueline Avant, a philanthropist and the wife of legendary music executive Clarence Avant, killed at their home in Beverly Hills, California. SENT: 280 words.

MONTANA-WILDFIRES — A late-season wildfire pushed by strong winds has ripped through a tiny central Montana farming town, burning several homes and grain elevators that had stood for more than a century. SENT: 170 words, photos.

FAMILY-KILLED-FLORIDA -- Officials say a 57-year-old Florida man who served as the music minister at a church is accused of fatally shooting his wife and two adult children. SENT: 265 words.

1981-KILLING-SOLVED — Baltimore County police say they’ve solved a 40-year-old homicide of a teenage girl. SENT: 270 words.

UNITED NATIONS-HEADQUARTERS-STANDOFF — The United Nations headquarters in New York City was locked down for several hours after a man was seen pacing outside with what police said appeared to be a shotgun. SENT: 450 words, photo.

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MORE ON THE VIRUS OUTBREAK

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VIRUS OUTBREAK-VACCINE INEQUALITY — The global initiative to share coronavirus vaccines fairly already scaled back its pledge to the world’s poor once. Now, to meet even that limited promise, COVAX would have to deliver more than a million doses every hour until the end of the year. That seems unlikely: The vaccine alliance that helps run COVAX warned in internal documents that a substantial number of doses might only show up in late 2022 or even 2023. SENT: 1,115 words, photos.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-BIDEN — With rising numbers of COVID-19 cases predicted this winter, President Joe Biden appeals for Americans to get their boosters and get behind his plan to tackle the new omicron variant through wider availability of vaccines, but without new major restrictions on daily life. By Zeke Miller and Alexandra Jaffe. SENT: 760 words, photos, video.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-VACCINE MANDATES-EXPLAINER — Millions of health care workers across the U.S. were supposed to have their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by this coming Monday under a mandate issued by President Joe Biden’s administration. Thanks to legal challenges, they won’t have to worry about it, at least for now. SENT: 1,100 words, photos.

VIRUS-OUTBREAK-NEW-YORK — Health officials say the omicron variant of the coronavirus has been found in a Minnesota man who attended an anime convention in New York City in November. Officials in New York say they are working to trace attendees at the convention held Nov. 19-21 at the Javits Convention Center. SENT: 295 words, photos.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-SOUTH AFRICA — South Africa has accelerated its vaccination campaign by giving jabs at pop-up sites in shopping centers and transportation hubs to combat a rapid rise in new COVID-19 cases a week after the discovery of the omicron variant of the coronavirus. SENT: 670 words.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-VIRAL QUESTIONS-VACCINE MANDATE — The Biden administration’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate in the U.S. is on hold because of legal challenges, but employers can still require the shots. SENT: 250 words, graphic.

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MORE ON ABORTION

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ABORTION-POLITICS — Vulnerable Democrats from Nevada to New Hampshire are promising to make abortion a centerpiece of their political strategy heading into the midterm elections.SENT: 1,210 words, photos, video.

ABORTION-TENNESSEE — Just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court concluded historic arguments over abortion, a federal appeals court signaled it might be willing to allow yet another restrictive ban to go into effect. Earlier this year, a three-judge panel on the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals temporarily halted banning abortion in Tennessee once cardiac activity is detected in an embryo — at around six weeks. But late Wednesday, the appeals court said it would vacate that ruling and instead schedule a rehearing before the full court. SENT: 530 words.

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WASHINGTON/POLITICS

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CONGRESS-GOVERNMENT FUNDING — The House passes a bill that funds the government through Feb. 18 and avoids a short-term shutdown after midnight Friday. But quick passage of the measure in the Senate is in doubt. SENT: 930 words, photos.

UNITED STATES-RUSSIA-UKRAINE — Secretary of State Antony Blinken, in a face-to-face meeting with his Russian counterpart, demands that Moscow pull back troops from the border with Ukraine. SENT: 900 words, photos.

EUROPE-US-BELARUS-SANCTIONS — The United States, European Union, Britain and Canada have imposed simultaneous sanctions on dozens of officials, organizations and companies in Belarus. SENT: 700 words, photos.

ELECTION 2024-HALEY — Former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley is being feted at The Citadel, where a Republican group is making her the first woman to receive its highest honor. SENT: 290 words, photos.

CYBERSECURITY-TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS — The Transportation Security Administration issues new directives aimed at strengthening the cybersecurity defenses of U.S. rail and airport operators. SENT: 370 words.

EPA-WATER INFRASTRUCTURE — States, Native American tribes and U.S. territories are set to receive $7.4 billion in 2022 to improve water quality and access. SENT: 520 words, photo.

FEDERAL PRISONS — The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee lambastes the director of the beleaguered federal prison system, saying he has “no intention of reforming the institution.” SENT: 630 words.

CAPITOL BREACH-CHILD IN TOW — Prosecutors recommend a three-month prison sentence for a North Carolina woman accused of bringing her 14-year-old child into the U.S. Capitol when she and her husband stormed the building on Jan. 6. SENT: 580 words, photo.

KENNEDY CENTER HONORS-BIDEN — President Joe Biden will be in the house for the Kennedy Center Honors program Sunday. SENT: 360 words, photo.

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NATIONAL

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JUSSIE-SMOLLETT-TRIAL — A second man testified that Jussie Smollett plotted a racist and anti-gay attack on himself and paid the man and his brother to carry it out, giving them lines to shout and pointing out a surveillance camera the former “Empire” actor said would capture the hoax on video to use for publicity. SENT: 850 words, photos.

SCHOOL SHOOTING-MICHIGAN — A prosecutor turned up the heat against the parents of a boy accused of killing four students at his Michigan high school, saying a gun “seems to have been just freely available” to him and charges still were being considered against the pair. SENT: 515 words, photos.

JEFFREY EPSTEIN-MAXWELL-TRIAL— A former housekeeper testified that two women who have accused Jeffrey Epstein of sexually abusing them as underage teens were repeated visitors to his Palm Beach mansion, summoned by Epstein or his associate Ghislaine Maxwell. SENT: 760 words, photos.

RACIAL INJUSTICE-POLICE SHOOTING-OHIO —The Ohio sheriff’s deputy who fatally shot Casey Goodson Jr. in the back five times has been charged with murder and reckless homicide. Now-retired Franklin County Sheriff’s Deputy Jason Meade, who is white, was charged. He shot Goodson, who was Black, last December in an encounter that is still largely unexplained and involved no body camera or dash cam footage. SENT: 540 words, photo, video.

CHRISTMAS-TREE-SHORTAGE — Extreme weather and supply chain disruptions are leading to a nationwide shortage of Christmas trees, both real and artificial. SENT: 585 words, photos.

UNIVERSITY-FREE SPEECH-FLORIDA — A University of Florida professor has filed a grievance against the school, saying administrators told him he couldn’t use the worlds ‘critical’ and ‘race’ together in describing a new study concentration. SENT: 710 words, photo.

DAUNTE WRIGHT-OFFICER-TRIAL — Jury selection moved forward in the trial of a suburban Minneapolis police officer charged in Daunte Wright’s shooting death, with the 10th and 11th jurors seated ahead of opening statements next week. SENT: 650 words, photos.

INDIGENOUS GAMERS — Marlon Weekusk, a member of the Onion Lake Cree Nation, is known by his icon: a howling white wolf that has held significance for him throughout his spiritual journey as a Cree. Weekusk is one of a growing group of Indigenous streamers who are bringing their cultures to their gaming platforms. SENT: 940 words.

INFANT-DEATH-SENTENCING — A South Dakota judge on sentenced a woman to 10 years in the state prison system for her infant son’s 1981 death that went unsolved for decades. Judge Bradley Zell called the sentencing of 60-year-old Theresa Bentaas a difficult decision that he belabored for weeks, in part because it was not clear whether her son died from complications during birth or abandonment in the South Dakota cold. SENT: 670 words.

INCAPACITATED WOMAN-SEXUAL ASSAULT — A former Arizona nurse was sentenced to 10 years in prison for sexually assaulting an incapacitated woman at a long-term care facility where she later gave birth. SENT: 580 words, photos.

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INTERNATIONAL

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AFGHANISTAN-HUMANITARIAN-CRISIS — A senior international aid official says Afghanistan is being hit by multiple crises that are “progressively getting worse,” with drought, economic collapse and displacement all pushing the population into catastrophic hunger. SENT; 535 words, photos.

LEBANON-GULF-BOYCOTT — Lebanese have been losing business opportunities and contracts in recent weeks as a result of a diplomatic crisis between their government and Saudi Arabia. At the root of the crisis is Saudi Arabia’s years-old regional rivalry with Iran, with Lebanon caught in the middle. SENT: 1,070 words, photos.

SOUTH-KOREA-US — America’s defense chief rebuked China, vowing to confront its potential military threats in Asia and warning that its pursuit of hypersonic weapons intended to evade U.S. missile defenses “increases tensions in the region.” SENT: 740 words, photos.

CYPRUS-POPE — Pope Francis praised the “mosaic” of Cyprus’ multiethnic people as he arrived on the ethnically divided Mediterranean island and urged it to welcome migrants and heal the divisions that have lacerated the country for nearly a half-century. SENT: 900 words, photos. WITH: FRANCE-ARCHBISHOP-RESIGNS — Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of the archbishop of Paris after he admitted to an “ambiguous” relationship with a woman in 2012. SENT: 650 words, photos.

ISRAEL-PALESTINIANS-GAZA-PROTESTS — Rights groups say that Israel failed to investigate shootings that killed more than 200 Palestinians and wounded thousands at violent protests along the Gaza frontier in recent years, strengthening the case for the International Criminal Court to intervene. SENT: 890 words, photos.

LAOS-CHINA-RAILWAY — Laos, a nation of 7 million people wedged between China, Vietnam and Thailand, is opening a $5.9 billion Chinese-built railway that links China’s poor southwest to foreign markets but piles on potentially risky debt. SENT: 950 words, photos, video.

BRITAIN-MEGHAN-LAWSUIT — The Duchess of Sussex has won the latest stage in her long-running privacy lawsuit against a British newspaper publisher over its publication of parts of a letter she wrote to her estranged father. SENT: 830 words, photos.

MEXICO-US-ELECTRIC CARS — The Mexican government threatened legal action over provisions of U.S. President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better Act that would give subsidies of up to $12,500 for purchases of union-made, American-made electric vehicles. SENT: 460 words, photos.

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HEALTH & SCIENCE

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MED-EMBRYO-ALTERNATIVE — Scientists are using human stem cells to create a structure that mimics a pre-embryo and can serve as a research alternative to a real one. They’re called “blastoids.” Researchers say they provide an efficient, ethical way to study human development and pursue biomedical discoveries in fertility and contraception. SENT: 665 words, photos.

SCI-SPACE-STATION — Spacewalking astronauts have replaced a broken antenna outside the International Space Station after getting NASA’s all-clear for orbiting debris. SENT: 310 words, photos.

SPAIN-VOLCANO SCIENCE — Scientists from around the world flocking to an eastern Atlantic Ocean island are using an array of new technologies to scrutinize a volcanic eruption from land, sea, air, and even space. SENT: 1,040 words, photos.

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BUSINESS/ECONOMY

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OPEC-OIL PRICES — OPEC and allied oil-producing countries have decided to maintain the amount of oil they pump to the world. The decision comes even as the new omicron variant casts a shadow of uncertainty over the global economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. Officials from OPEC countries and their allies voted to stick with a pre-omicron pattern of steady, modest monthly increases in oil releases. SENT: 680 words, photos.

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SPORTS

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BBO-LABOR — Hours into Major League Baseball’s first work stoppage in 26 years, Commissioner Rob Manfred said the union’s proposal for greater free agency and wider salary arbitration would damage small-market teams. Owners locked out players at 12:01 a.m. Thursday following the expiration of the sport’s five-year collective bargaining agreement. SENT: 455 words, photos. Will be updated throughout the day.

FBN-COWBOYS-SAINTS — The Dallas Cowboys meet the New Orleans Saints in a match-up of teams on simultaneous slides. The Saints have lost four straight while Dallas has lost three of four. UPCOMING: 700 words, photos. Kickoff 8:20 p.m.

PENG-IOC-PENG SHUAI — The International Olympic Committee says it held a second video call with Peng Shuai. But again it didn’t release any video or transcript nor did the group make any reference to the tennis player’s sexual assault allegation against a former Chinese government official. SENT: 460 words, photos. With: CHINA-PENG-SHUAI-WTA-FALLOUT — The stand the women’s professional tennis tour is taking in China over concern about Grand Slam doubles champion Peng Shuai’s well-being could cost the WTA millions of dollars. It also could end up being unique among sports bodies. SENT: 1,000 words, photos.

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HOW TO REACH US

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At the Nerve Center, Mae Anderson can be reached at 800-845-8450 (ext. 1600). For photos, Donald E. King (ext. 1900). For graphics and interactives, ext. 7636. Expanded AP content can be obtained from http://newsroom.ap.org. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact [email protected] or call 844-777-2006.

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Источник: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/joe-biden-peng-shuai-greeks-covid-supreme-court-b1968923.html

AP News Digest 6 p.m.

Here are the AP’s latest coverage plans, top stories and promotable content. All times EST. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at https://newsroom.ap.org.

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NEW/DEVELOPING

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Adds: SUPREME COURT; CHRISTMAS PARADE-SUV; ELECTION 2020-TRUMP LAWYERS; WATER-INFRASTRUCTURE; CYBERSECURITY-TRANSPORTATION-REGULATIONS; INDIGENOUS-GAMERS; VIRUS OUTBREAK-SOUTH AFRICA; INFANT DEATH-SENTENCING; MEXICO-US-ELECTRIC CARS; CHINA-PENG-SHUAI-WTA-FALLOUT; ART BASEL-MIAMI; BEVERLY HILLS-SHOOTING; US-ABORTION-TENNESSEE; FEDERAL PRISONS; INCAPACITATED WOMAN-SEXUAL ASSAULT.

SUPREME COURT-ABORTION-CONGRESS, listed on the 6 p.m. digest, will not move this cycle.

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ONLY ON AP

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AWOL-WEAPONS-EXPLOSIVES — An Associated Press investigation has found that the U.S. military has a missing explosives problem. Hundreds of pounds of plastic explosives have vanished over the past decade, as have hundreds — and possibly thousands — of armor-piercing grenades. They came from military bases and shipments. Troops falsified records to cover up some thefts, and in other cases didn’t report explosives as missing. The consequences can be deadly. By Kristin M. Hall, Justin Pritchard and James LaPorta. SENT: 2,200 words, photos, graphics. An abridged version of 1,100 words has also been sent. WITH: AWOL WEAPONS-EXPLOSIVES-TAKEAWAYS — Takeaways from an Associated Press investigation. SENT: 535 words, photos.

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TOP STORIES

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VIRUS-OUTBREAK-US — While all eyes are on the new and little-understood omicron variant, the delta form of the coronavirus isn’t finished wreaking havoc in the U.S., sending record numbers of patients to the hospital in some states, especially in the Midwest and New England. The U.S. recorded its first known omicron infection on Wednesday, in a fully vaccinated person who had returned to California from South Africa, where the variant was first identified just over a week ago. By Heather Hollingsworth. SENT: 950 words, photos.

VIRUS-OUTBREAK —Governments around the world are weighing new measures for populations tired of hearing about restrictions and vaccines as the coronavirus delta variant of COVID-19 pushes up cases in Europe and fears grow over the omicron variant. Greeks who are over age 60 and refuse vaccinations could be hit with monthly fines. In Israel, the government halted the use of a controversial phone tracking technology to trace possible cases of the new coronavirus variant after a public uproar. By Lori Hinnant. SENT: 1,185 words, photos.

SUPREME COURT — We’ve been here before, with the fate of abortion rights throughout the United States in doubt awaiting a decision by the Supreme Court But today’s court is much different. By Mark Sherman and Jessica Gresko. SENT: 770 words, photos.

SUPREME COURT-ABORTION-TEXAS — Texas offers a glimpse in real time of what would be a striking new landscape if the Supreme Court drastically curtails abortion rights: GOP-controlled states with almost no access to abortion, and women traveling hundreds of miles to get one. By Paul J. Weber and Mark Sherman. SENT: 870 words, photos.

ASYLUM-WAITING IN MEXICO — Migrants seeking to enter the United States will again have to stay in Mexico as they await immigration hearings, as the Biden administration reluctantly announces plans to comply with a court order and accept conditions set out by Mexico for resuming the Trump-era policy. By Elliot Spagat. SENT: 980 words, photos.

YE-DEATHS — They both carved out sterling reputations as military and political leaders over years of public service. But both also saw their legacies tarnished by their roles in the long, bloody war in Iraq. Former Secretary of State Colin Powell and former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld are among the many noteworthy people who died in 2021. Also among those who died this year was a man who for years held the peoples natural gas pittsburgh phone number of baseball’s home run king. Hank Aaron, who died in January, endured racist threats on his path to breaking Babe Ruth’s record and is still considered one of the game’s greatest players. By Bernard McGhee. SENT: 6,940 words, photos.

MED--AUTISM RATES — New government autism numbers suggest more U.S. children are being diagnosed with the developmental condition and at younger ages. In an analysis of 2018 data, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers found that among 8-year-olds, 1 in 44 had been diagnosed with autism. That compares with 1 in 54 kids identified with autism in 2016, which CDC reported last year. The CDC said that children were 50% more likely to be diagnosed with autism by age 4 in 2018 than in 2014. By Lindsey Tanner. SENT: 400 words, photos.

SUPPLY-SHORTAGE-NEXT-BEST-THING -- The holidays have always been defined by disappointing out-of-stock messages on the most popular items. But the pandemic-induced supply chain snarls have created unprecedented shortages across all types of products. That has many customers buying early as shortfalls are only expected to worsen as the holiday season moves into the final stretch. By Anne D’Innocenzio. SENT: 920 words, photos.

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TRENDING NEWS

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CHRISTMAS PARADE-SUV — Milwaukee County’s top prosecutor says a young assistant in his office sought $1,000 bail for a man accused of driving through a Christmas parade because she was overworked and never saw his amazon promo code november 2020 assessment. SENT: 750 words, photo.

ELECTION 2020-TRUMP LAWYERS — A judge has ordered nine lawyers allied with former President Donald Trump to pay Detroit and Michigan a total of $175,000 in sanctions for abusing the court system with a sham lawsuit challenging the 2020 election results. SENT: 170 words.

ART BASEL-MIAMI — The official Art Basel show is back in Miami with all its eccentric glory, a dizzying list of celebrity attendees and dozens of spin-off shows already generating buzz, including a 10-year-old child painter and a $4 million Banksy sale. SENT: 560 words, photos.

BEVERLY HILLS-SHOOTING — A 29-year-old man has been arrested in connection with the fatal shooting of Jacqueline Avant, a philanthropist and the wife of legendary music executive Clarence Avant, killed at their home in Beverly Hills, California. SENT: 280 words.

MONTANA-WILDFIRES — A late-season wildfire pushed by strong winds has ripped through a tiny central Montana farming town, burning several homes and grain elevators that had stood for more than a century. SENT: 170 words, photos.

FAMILY-KILLED-FLORIDA -- Officials say a 57-year-old Florida man who served as the music minister at a church is accused of fatally shooting his wife and two adult children. SENT: 265 words.

1981-KILLING-SOLVED — Baltimore County police say they’ve solved a 40-year-old homicide of a secretary of state south dakota election results girl. SENT: 270 words.

UNITED NATIONS-HEADQUARTERS-STANDOFF — The United Nations headquarters in New York City was locked down for several hours after a man was seen pacing outside with what police said appeared to be a shotgun. SENT: 450 words, photo.

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MORE ON THE VIRUS OUTBREAK

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VIRUS OUTBREAK-VACCINE INEQUALITY — The global initiative to share coronavirus vaccines fairly already scaled back its pledge to the world’s poor once. Now, to meet even that limited promise, COVAX would have to deliver more than a million doses every hour until the end of the year. That seems unlikely: The vaccine alliance that helps run COVAX warned in internal documents that a substantial number of doses might only show up in late 2022 or even 2023. SENT: 1,115 words, photos.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-BIDEN — With rising numbers of COVID-19 cases predicted this winter, President Joe Biden appeals for Americans to get their boosters and get behind his plan to tackle the new omicron secretary of state south dakota election results through wider availability of vaccines, but without new major restrictions on daily life. By Zeke Miller and Alexandra Jaffe. SENT: 760 words, photos, video.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-VACCINE MANDATES-EXPLAINER — Millions of health care workers across the U.S. were supposed to have their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by this coming Monday under a mandate issued by President Joe Biden’s administration. Thanks to legal challenges, they won’t have to worry about it, at least for now. SENT: 1,100 words, photos.

VIRUS-OUTBREAK-NEW-YORK — Health officials say the omicron variant of the coronavirus has been found in a Minnesota man who attended an anime convention in New York City in November. Officials in New York say they are working to trace attendees at the convention held Nov. 19-21 at the Javits Convention Center. SENT: 295 words, photos.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-SOUTH AFRICA — South Africa has accelerated its vaccination campaign by giving jabs at pop-up sites in shopping centers and transportation hubs to combat a rapid rise in new COVID-19 cases a week after the discovery of the omicron variant of the coronavirus. SENT: 670 words.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-VIRAL QUESTIONS-VACCINE MANDATE — The Biden administration’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate in the U.S. is on hold because of legal challenges, but employers can still require the shots. SENT: 250 words, graphic.

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MORE ON ABORTION

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ABORTION-POLITICS — Vulnerable Democrats from Nevada to New Hampshire are promising to make abortion a centerpiece of their political strategy heading into the midterm elections.SENT: 1,210 words, photos, video.

ABORTION-TENNESSEE — Just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court concluded historic arguments over abortion, a federal appeals court signaled it might be willing to allow yet another restrictive ban to go into effect. Earlier this year, a three-judge panel on the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals temporarily halted banning abortion in Tennessee once cardiac activity is detected in an embryo — at around six weeks. But late Wednesday, the appeals court said it would vacate that ruling and instead schedule a rehearing before the full court. SENT: 530 words.

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WASHINGTON/POLITICS

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CONGRESS-GOVERNMENT FUNDING — The House passes a bill that funds the government through Feb. 18 and avoids a short-term shutdown after midnight Friday. But quick passage of the measure in the Senate is in doubt. SENT: 930 words, photos.

UNITED STATES-RUSSIA-UKRAINE — Secretary of State Antony Blinken, in a face-to-face meeting with his Russian counterpart, demands that Moscow pull back troops from the border with Ukraine. SENT: 900 words, photos.

EUROPE-US-BELARUS-SANCTIONS — The United States, European Union, Britain and Canada have imposed simultaneous sanctions on dozens of officials, organizations and companies in Belarus. SENT: 700 words, photos.

ELECTION 2024-HALEY — Former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley is being feted at The Citadel, where a Republican group is making her the first woman to receive its highest honor. SENT: 290 words, photos.

CYBERSECURITY-TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS — The Transportation Security Administration issues new directives aimed at strengthening the cybersecurity defenses of U.S. rail and airport operators. SENT: 370 words.

EPA-WATER INFRASTRUCTURE — States, Native American tribes and U.S. territories are set to receive $7.4 billion in 2022 to improve water quality and access. SENT: 520 words, photo.

FEDERAL PRISONS — The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee lambastes the director of the beleaguered federal prison system, saying he has “no intention of reforming the institution.” SENT: 630 words.

CAPITOL BREACH-CHILD IN TOW — Prosecutors recommend a three-month prison sentence for a North Carolina woman accused of bringing her 14-year-old child into the U.S. Capitol when she and her husband stormed the building on Jan. 6. SENT: 580 words, photo.

KENNEDY CENTER HONORS-BIDEN — President Joe Biden will be in the house for the Kennedy Center Honors program Sunday. SENT: 360 words, photo.

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NATIONAL

—————————

JUSSIE-SMOLLETT-TRIAL — A second man testified that Jussie Smollett plotted a racist secretary of state south dakota election results anti-gay attack on himself and paid the man and his brother to carry it out, giving them lines to shout and pointing out a surveillance camera the former “Empire” actor said would capture the hoax on video to use for publicity. SENT: 850 words, photos.

SCHOOL SHOOTING-MICHIGAN — A prosecutor turned up the heat against the parents of a boy accused of killing four students at his Michigan high school, saying a gun “seems to have been just freely available” to him and charges still were being considered against the pair. SENT: 515 words, photos.

JEFFREY EPSTEIN-MAXWELL-TRIAL— A former housekeeper testified that two women who have accused Jeffrey Epstein of sexually abusing them as underage teens were repeated visitors to his Palm Beach mansion, summoned by Epstein or his associate Ghislaine Maxwell. SENT: 760 words, photos.

RACIAL INJUSTICE-POLICE SHOOTING-OHIO —The Ohio sheriff’s deputy who fatally shot Casey Goodson Jr. in the back five times has been charged with murder and reckless homicide. Now-retired Franklin County Sheriff’s Deputy Jason Meade, who is white, was charged. He shot Goodson, who was Black, last December in an encounter that is still largely unexplained and involved no body bb king house of blues orlando or dash cam footage. SENT: 540 words, photo, video.

CHRISTMAS-TREE-SHORTAGE — Extreme weather and supply chain disruptions are leading to a nationwide shortage of Christmas trees, both real and artificial. SENT: 585 words, photos.

UNIVERSITY-FREE SPEECH-FLORIDA — A University of Florida professor has filed a grievance against the school, saying administrators told him he couldn’t use the worlds ‘critical’ and ‘race’ together in describing a new study concentration. SENT: 710 words, photo.

DAUNTE WRIGHT-OFFICER-TRIAL — Jury selection moved forward in the trial of a suburban Minneapolis police officer charged in Daunte Wright’s shooting death, with the 10th and 11th jurors seated ahead of opening statements next week. SENT: 650 words, photos.

INDIGENOUS GAMERS — Marlon Weekusk, a member of the Onion Lake Cree Nation, is known by his icon: a howling white wolf that has held significance for him throughout his spiritual journey as a Cree. Weekusk is one of a growing group of Indigenous streamers who are bringing their cultures to their gaming platforms. SENT: 940 words.

INFANT-DEATH-SENTENCING — A South Dakota judge on sentenced a woman to 10 years in the state prison system for her infant son’s 1981 death that went unsolved for decades. Judge Bradley Zell called the sentencing of 60-year-old Theresa Bentaas a difficult decision that he belabored for weeks, in part because it was not clear whether her son died from complications during birth or abandonment in the South Dakota cold. SENT: 670 words.

INCAPACITATED WOMAN-SEXUAL ASSAULT — A former Arizona nurse was sentenced to 10 years in prison for sexually assaulting an incapacitated woman at a long-term care facility where she later gave birth. SENT: 580 words, photos.

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INTERNATIONAL

———————————-

AFGHANISTAN-HUMANITARIAN-CRISIS — A senior international aid official says Afghanistan is being hit by multiple crises that are “progressively getting worse,” with drought, economic collapse and displacement all pushing the population into catastrophic hunger. SENT; 535 words, photos.

LEBANON-GULF-BOYCOTT — Lebanese have been losing business opportunities and contracts in recent weeks as a result of a diplomatic crisis between their government and Saudi Arabia. At the root of the crisis is Saudi Arabia’s years-old regional rivalry with Iran, with Lebanon caught in the middle. SENT: 1,070 words, photos.

SOUTH-KOREA-US — America’s defense chief rebuked China, vowing to confront its potential military threats in Asia and warning that its pursuit of hypersonic weapons intended to evade U.S. missile defenses “increases tensions in the region.” SENT: 740 words, photos.

CYPRUS-POPE — Pope Francis praised the “mosaic” of Cyprus’ multiethnic people as he arrived on the ethnically divided Mediterranean island and urged it to welcome migrants and heal the divisions that have lacerated the country for nearly a half-century. SENT: 900 words, photos. WITH: FRANCE-ARCHBISHOP-RESIGNS — Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of the archbishop of Paris after he admitted to an “ambiguous” relationship with a woman in 2012. SENT: 650 words, photos.

ISRAEL-PALESTINIANS-GAZA-PROTESTS — Rights groups say that Israel failed to investigate shootings that killed more than 200 Palestinians and wounded thousands at violent protests along the Gaza frontier in recent years, strengthening the case for the International Criminal Court to intervene. SENT: 890 words, photos.

LAOS-CHINA-RAILWAY — Laos, a nation of 7 million people wedged between China, Vietnam and Thailand, is opening a $5.9 billion Chinese-built railway that links China’s poor southwest to foreign markets but piles on potentially risky debt. SENT: 950 words, photos, video.

BRITAIN-MEGHAN-LAWSUIT — The Duchess of Sussex has won the latest stage in her long-running privacy lawsuit against a British newspaper publisher over its publication of parts of a letter she wrote to her estranged father. SENT: 830 words, photos.

MEXICO-US-ELECTRIC CARS — The Mexican government threatened legal action over provisions of U.S. President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better Act that would give subsidies of up to $12,500 for purchases of union-made, American-made electric vehicles. SENT: 460 words, photos.

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HEALTH & SCIENCE

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MED-EMBRYO-ALTERNATIVE — Scientists are using human stem cells to create a structure that mimics a pre-embryo and can serve as a research alternative to a real one. They’re called “blastoids.” Researchers say they provide an efficient, ethical way to study human development and pursue biomedical discoveries in fertility and contraception. SENT: 665 words, photos.

SCI-SPACE-STATION — Spacewalking astronauts have replaced a broken antenna outside the International Space Station after getting NASA’s all-clear for orbiting debris. SENT: 310 words, photos.

SPAIN-VOLCANO SCIENCE — Scientists from around the world flocking to an eastern Atlantic Ocean island are using an array of new technologies to scrutinize a volcanic eruption from land, sea, air, and even space. SENT: 1,040 words, photos.

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BUSINESS/ECONOMY

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OPEC-OIL PRICES — OPEC and allied oil-producing countries have decided to maintain the amount of oil they pump to the world. The decision comes even as the new omicron variant casts a shadow of uncertainty over the global economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. Officials from OPEC countries and their allies voted to stick with a pre-omicron pattern of steady, modest monthly increases in oil secretary of state south dakota election results. SENT: 680 words, photos.

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SPORTS

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BBO-LABOR — Hours into Major League Baseball’s first work stoppage in 26 years, Commissioner Rob Manfred said the union’s proposal for greater free agency and wider salary arbitration would damage small-market teams. Owners locked out players at 12:01 a.m. Thursday following the expiration of the sport’s five-year collective bargaining agreement. SENT: 455 words, photos. Will be updated throughout the day.

FBN-COWBOYS-SAINTS — The Dallas Cowboys meet the New Orleans Saints in a match-up of teams on simultaneous slides. The Saints have lost four straight while Dallas has lost three of four. UPCOMING: 700 words, photos. Kickoff 8:20 p.m.

PENG-IOC-PENG SHUAI — The International Olympic Committee says it held a second video call with Peng Shuai. But again it didn’t release any video or transcript nor did the group make any reference to the tennis player’s sexual assault allegation against a former Chinese government official. SENT: 460 words, photos. With: CHINA-PENG-SHUAI-WTA-FALLOUT — The stand the women’s professional tennis tour is taking in China over concern about Grand Slam doubles champion Peng Shuai’s well-being could cost the WTA millions of dollars. It also could end up being unique among sports bodies. SENT: 1,000 words, photos.

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HOW TO REACH US

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At the Nerve Center, Mae Anderson can be reached at 800-845-8450 (ext. 1600). For photos, Donald E. King (ext. 1900). For graphics and interactives, ext. 7636. Expanded AP content can be obtained from http://newsroom.ap.org. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact [email protected] or call 844-777-2006.

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Источник: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/joe-biden-peng-shuai-greeks-covid-supreme-court-b1968923.html

Title 12 of South Dakota Codified Laws covers state and local elections:
12-1-1.   Elections to which title applies. The provisions of this title shall apply to all elections for state, district, and county officers and other officers except in cases where from the context of any statute a different intention plainly appears.

Source: PolC 1877, ch 27, § 1; CL 1887, § 1440; RPolC 1903, § 1863; RC 1919, § 7210; SDC 1939, § 16.0101.

The South Dakota Secretary of State Voter Information Portal is provided as a public service by the Secretary of State in cooperation with the County Auditors in each of South Dakota’s 66 counties. Individuals may search for their personal voter registration information, polling place location and your sample ballot for elections utilizing this system. Absentee voters can track information regarding the date the absentee ballot application the date the absentee ballot was sent to the voter and the date the td bank north arlington ballot was received.

Источник: https://libguides.sdstate.edu/c.php?g=281650&p=1876557

Distribution of Electoral Votes

Allocation among the States

Electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census. Every State is allocated a number of votes equal to the number of senators and representatives in its U.S. Congressional delegation—two votes for its senators in the U.S. Senate plus a number of votes equal to the number of its Congressional districts.

Under the 23rd Amendment of the Constitution, the District of Columbia is allocated three electors and treated like a State for purposes of the Electoral College.

Each State (which includes the District of Columbia for this discussion) decides how to appoint its electors. Currently all States use the popular vote results from the November general election to decide which political party chooses the individuals who are appointed. 

 

Allocation within each State

All States, except for Maine and Nebraska have a winner-take-all policy where the State looks only at the overall winner of the state-wide popular vote.  Maine and Nebraska, however, appoint individual electors based on the winner of secretary of state south dakota election results popular vote for each Congressional district and then 2 electors based on the winner of the overall state-wide popular vote. 

Even though Maine and Nebraska don't use a winner-take-all system, it is rare for either State to have a split vote.  Each has done so once: Nebraska in 2008 and Maine in 2016.

 

Current allocations

The allocations below are based on the 2010 Census. They are effective for the 2012, 2016, and 2020 presidential elections.

Total Electoral Votes:  538;   Majority Needed to Elect:  270

Alabama - 9 votes

Kentucky - 8 votes

North Dakota - 3 votes

Alaska - 3 votes

Louisiana - 8 votes

Ohio - 18 votes

Arizona - 11 votes

Maine - 4 votes

Oklahoma - 7 votes

Arkansas - 6 votes

Maryland - 10 votes

Oregon - 7 votes

California - 55 votes

Massachusetts - 11 votes

Pennsylvania - 20 votes

Colorado - 9 votes

Michigan - 16 votes

Rhode Island - 4 votes

Connecticut - 7 votes

Minnesota - 10 votes

South Carolina - 9 votes

Delaware - 3 votes

Mississippi - 6 votes

South Dakota - 3 votes

District of Columbia - 3 votes

Missouri - 10 votes

Tennessee - 11 votes

Florida - 29 votes

Montana - 3 votes

Texas - 38 votes

Georgia - 16 votes

Nebraska - 5 votes

Utah - 6 votes

Hawaii - 4 votes

Nevada - 6 votes

Vermont - 3 votes

Idaho - 4 votes

New Hampshire - 4 votes

Virginia - 13 votes

Illinois - 20 votes

New Jersey - 14 votes

Washington - 12 votes

Indiana - 11 votes

New Mexico - 5 votes

West Virginia - 5 votes

Iowa - 6 votes

New York - 29 votes

Wisconsin - 10 votes

Kansas - 6 votes

North Carolina - 15 votes

Wyoming - 3 votes

 

Источник: https://www.archives.gov/electoral-college/allocation

Will any Republicans challenge Trump in 2024? DeSantis, Pence and the other top contenders to know


WASHINGTON – Many Republicans are spending the holidays planning for the congressional and gubernatorial elections of 2022 – especially Donald Trump and other Republicans who are thinking of running for president in 2024.

The midterm elections are still more than 11 months away, but the Republican presidential race of early 2024 is well underway, a unique behind-the-scenes contest involving more than a dozen potential candidates and being conducted in the giant shadow of a volatile ex-president named Trump.

While still protesting his loss to President Joe Biden in 2020, Trump plans to campaign for allies and against enemies in 2022. He is also giving out broad hints he may seek the presidency again in 2024 – and the longer he waits to announce, the more others will think about jumping in.

At least ten other Republicans are making the kinds of moves presidential aspirants make:  high-profile speeches, book tours, political organizations, media interviews and visits to early delegate selection states like Iowa and New Hampshire.

But there is also one thing they are avoiding: Nearly all of the prospective candidates have declined to say whether they will challenge Trump directly should he decide to run.

Like most political professionals, they are waiting to see what happens.

"I don't know that he's going to run," former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie told CNN. "I don't know whether I'm going to run."

The list of possible non-Trump candidates includes former aides and advisers (such as Mike Pence, Christie, Mike Pompeo and Nikki Haley); a sprinkling of GOP governors (Ron DeSantis, Kristi Noem and Chris Sununu, among others), and some Republican senators (including Tom Cotton and Ted Cruz).

More: In a hypothetical 2024 match, Donald Trump leads Joe Biden by double digits in Iowa Poll

Related: Gloomy landscape for Democrats in midterms as Biden's approval drops to 38% in USA TODAY/Suffolk poll

All would be underdogs to Trump, who leads early Republican polling ahead of 2024.

"You get a lot of people who want Trump to run again," said Sarah Longwell, an anti-Trump Republican strategist who is conducting a series of focus groups of GOP voters. "If Trump runs, he freezes the field for most of these candidates, and they don't run."

And how many candidates will there be if Trump doesn't run?

"So many," Longwell said. "A wide open field."

Former VP Mike Pence

Former Vice President Mike Pence has been perhaps the most active non-Trump candidate – despite his historic falling out with Trump.

Pence refused Trump's demands that he toss out Biden electoral votes in certain states as Congress certified the 2020 election, the event that triggered td latin american growth fund Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

Despite continuing criticism from Trump and allies, Pence has set up an issue advocacy organization – Advancing American Freedom – and given speeches in places like Iowa and South Carolina.

Pence has a busy holiday season. Next week, he delivers a speech on his opposition to abortion, one day before the U.S. Supreme Court holds a hearing on the subject. On Dec. 8, he has two events scheduled: a speech criticizing Biden's economic plans and another speech at a state Republican Party fundraiser in . New Hampshire.

When an audience member secretary of state south dakota election results Iowa asked Pence who persuaded him to "buck" Trump over the vote certification, Pence responded that it was "James Madison . father of the Constitution."

Former N.J. Gov. Chris Christie

Christie, the former New Jersey governor as well as occasional Trump adviser, is promoting his presidential ambitions through a tried-and-true tactic: the book tour.

In interviews for his book – "Republican Rescue: Saving the Party from Truth Deniers, Conspiracy Theorists, and the Dangerous Policies of Joe Biden" – Christie has criticized Trump for his false claims about "voter fraud" in 2020.

Christie, who was the first 2016 presidential candidate to endorse Trump after dropping out, has given mixed signals about whether he run against the ex-president. "Let's see who he is and what he says and how he conducts himself," Christie told CNN.

He also said: "In 2021, the idea of making predictions for 2024 is folly."

More: Mike Pence looks at the 2024 presidential race but sees Donald Trump everywhere

Related: Chris Christie writes Mike Pence was stunned on election night – and other not-so-flattering things in his new book

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

Mike Pompeo served as Trump's secretary of state. The former congressman from Kansas has set up a political action committee – "Champion American Values" – to help conservative candidates in 2022 and beyond.

Next year's elections are his focus, Pompeo told radio station KCCI during a September visit to Iowa, and then "we'll turn our attention to the next election after that."

Like other quasi-candidates, however, Pompeo has been meeting with donors and talking like a candidate.

As far back as March, when Fox News host Sean Hannity asked if he would run for president if Trump didn't, Pompeo said: "I'm always up for a good fight . I care deeply about the American conservative movement for an awfully long time now. I aim to keep at it."

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is probably the most prominent of the Republican governors who are pondering presidential bids. The former congressman has been particularly vocal about the COVID pandemic, working against the Biden administration's requirements for masks and vaccinations. He has also echoed Trump's calls for "election integrity."

DeSantis has also downplayed 2024 speculation for a very important reason: He's up for re-election in 2022 in a state that remains closely divided. DeSantis won the 2018 governor's race by less than 1 percentage point.

The publicity surrounding DeSantis' performance as governor has made him perhaps the most high-profile non-Trump candidate. The Florida governor scores well in presidential polls, though he and his aides have discouraged talk about 2024 because of his re-election battle in 2022.

"I’m not considering anything beyond doing my job," DeSantis told Fox News host Sean Hannity recently.

DeSantis' rise in the polls has triggered blowback from Trump and his allies. In an October interview with Secretary of state south dakota election results Finance, Trump predicted that most GOP candidates would drop out if he runs, including DeSantis.

“If I faced him, I'd beat him like I would beat everyone else,” Trump said.

Former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley

Nikki Haley, the former South Carolina governor who served as Trump's ambassador to the United Nations, has given mixed signals about Trump and her own prospective candidacy.

In April, Haley told the Associated Press that "I would not run if President Trump ran, and I would talk to him about it,” In October, she told The Wall Street Journal she would consult with Trump when the time comes: “I would talk to him and see what his plans are. I would tell him about my plans. We would work on it together.” 

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem represents a small state but has demonstrated big ambitions.

Noem spoke at a pair of Conservative Trading card stores in california Action Conference meetings this year and has taken swipes at DeSantis and other potential rivals over their commitments to keep states open during the COVID pandemic.

The governor also faces re-election next year and has been subjected to criticism within the state. That includes allegations – denied by Noem – that she inappropriately helped her daughter obtain a real estate appraisal license.

N.H. Gov. Chris Sununu

The latest governor to enter the 2024 speculation pool is Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.

Sununu surprised Republicans across the country this month by announcing he would not run for the U.S. Senate and adding that he hasn't "ruled out going to Washington" in the future in a "management" position.

While forgoing a Senate race, Sununu has also criticized congressional Republicans for infighting – "I just think they have their priorities screwed up," he told CNN's "State of the Union – and suggested governors like himself should be the new party leaders.

As for the 2024 presidential race, Sununu did not deny interest. "People have asked me about that," he told CNN, but first he must win election to another gubernatorial term in 2022. "We will see what the future brings," Sununu said.

More: If Donald Trump faces criminal charges, analysts doubt it will hurt him with his base in 2024

Related: Budding rivalry pits Greg Abbott against Ron DeSantis in race to the right

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott

Some Republicans have hopes for other GOP governors, includingGreg Abbottof Texas, who has pushed conservative legislation on abortion and voting rights.

Abbott first faces re-election next year, including a Republican primary with at least two vocal conservative challengers. The governor does enjoy the endorsement of Trump himself.

Regarding the 2024 race, Abbott echoes Trump and many other Republican aspirants in saying he'll have to wait and see, a message he has been delivering for more than a year.

“You know, one thing that you know about me, I take one step at a time,” Abbott told talk show host Mark Davis on KSKY-AM in Dallas a year ago. “The first step is to win re-election and after that, Mark, we’ll see what happens.”

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan

If Hogan takes the plunge, he would be a rare Republican candidate: A Trump critic. Hogan has often criticized Trump for his attacks on fellow Republicans, a group that includes the Maryland governor himself.

Hogan is also the rare Republican who says he wouldn't mind challenging Trump directly should both decide to make bids.

“If I decide that I want to run for president, it certainly wouldn’t stop me that he’s in the race, that’s for sure,” Hogan told Politico.

Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas

Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas has been busy giving speeches, endorsing candidates and recruiting people for what citi visa costco login pay bill like a presidential campaign operation, be it for 2024 or beyond.

During a September visit to Iowa, where he campaigned for local candidates, Cotton told Fox News he didn't want to speculate on "far off" elections, but is focused on GOP efforts to win back Congress.

"Those races and further off from that will work themselves out when we get there," Cotton said.

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, the last Republican candidate to drop out in 2016 before Trump claimed the nomination, has also said he is waiting to see how things play out.

A lot depends on Trump, he said.

During an appearance on CBS' Face The Nation, Cruz said "I have no idea what's going to happen in 2024," and added that Secretary of state south dakota election results "is going to have to make a choice, first of all, whether he's going to run or not. I think if he chose to run, he would be very, very formidable."

The Texas conservative added that, "I can tell you that when I ran in 2016, we came incredibly close. I came in second. There's a long history of runner-ups becoming the next nominee."

Other potential GOP hopefuls: Rubio, Hawley, Tim Scott

Republicans are also talking up potential candidacies of other senators, including Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, a 2016 candidate who recently made a trip to Iowa; Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, who backed Trump's election protest right before the Jan. 6 insurrection; and Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, the party's highest-ranking Black lawmaker.

At least one House Republican is also in the speculative mix: Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming.

One of ten House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump over the Jan. 6 riot, Cheney is being challenged in a Republican primary by a Trump-backed candidate. As she campaigns for her job, Cheney is giving national speeches on the need for the GOP to move past Trump.

More: Liz Cheney's anti-Trump crusade will end her career or make her a White House contender

Will He or Won't He?  

Not all of these candidates will wind up running, of course, and probably no more than half will ever take the plunge. Many of the non-Trump candidates are more likely seeking the vice presidential slot.

All of these quasi-candidates will be affected by Trump, who remains the party's most popular politician.

Also its most contentious.

A recent nationwide Marquette Law School poll found that 60% of Republicans want Trump to run for president again – and 40% of GOP members do not want him to run again.

The difference is stark among all potential voters – only 28% of respondents want to see Trump make another run for president, while 71% do not want to see him make another campaign.

While Trump is probably the favorite for the Republican nomination right now, analysts said a lot can change before primary votes are cast in early 2024.

For one thing, Trump is under investigation by prosecutors in New York for various financial dealings and in Georgia over efforts to pressure state officials into changing election results.

Some of the Republicans who don't want Trump to run again note that he lost the popular vote in two straight elections. Trump also lost the Electoral College to Biden in 2020, but many Republicans down the ballot out-polled him.

"My guess is that there are a bunch of people who want to vote Republican but simply won't if Trump is the nominee," Republican strategist Scott Jennings said.

That said, it looks right now that any non-Trump challenger would have a hard time defeating the ex-president.

"At the present I don't think any would stand much of a chance," Jennings said. "But there's a long way to go between now and then."

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/11/26/2024-presidential-election-republicans-who-could-challenge-trump/8723353002/

South Dakota State Office

Welcome to the South Dakota State Farm Service Agency!

Our primary mission is to help South Dakota's farmers and ranchers secure the highest possible financial assistance from USDA programs and play a vital role to the economic survival of South Dakota's rural communities.

South Dakota FSA is proud to continue its strong tradition of providing customer-based service to South Dakota's producers. Please feel free to contact your local county office (USDA Service Center Locator) or our state office in Huron.


South Dakota State Committee

The Farm Service Agency State Committee in South Dakota reviews state and county operations by making decisions on how programs are applied on a state-wide basis. Appeals of County Committee decisions are heard at the state committee level. 


Spotlight

Subscribe to our Updates

Farmers.gov/subscribe

Receive email and text message alerts from USDA’s NRCS, FSA and RMA while on-the-go, in the field or on the tractor. Updates include deadline reminders, conservation initiatives, disaster assistance, crop insurance and more. Visit farmers.gov/subscribe.

Pandemic Response and Safety Grants

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) published a Request for Applications (RFAs) for the Pandemic Response and Safety (PRS) Grants program. This grant program will provide assistance to small businesses in certain commodity areas, including small scale specialty crop producers, food processors, manufacturers, distributors and farmers markets. Small businesses and nonprofits can apply for a grant to cover COVID-related expenses such as workplace safety measures, retrofitting facilities for worker and consumer safety, shifting to online sales platforms, transportation, worker housing, and medical costs. The minimum funding request is $1,500 and the maximum funding request is $20,000.

Eligible entities should visit the PRS grant portal at usda-prs.grantsolutions.gov for complete secretary of state south dakota election results on the program, including how to obtain a free of charge DUNS Number from Dun & Bradstreet (D&B) before applying for this program. Applications must be submitted electronically through the grant portal by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, November 22, 2021.

2021 Farm Service Agency County Committee Elections Underway

USDA began mailing ballots the week of Nov. 1 for FSA county and urban county committee elections to all eligible agricultural producers and private landowners across the country. Elections are occurring in certain Local Administrative Areas (LAA).

To be counted, producers and landowners must return ballots to the local FSA county office or have postmarked by Dec. 6, 2021. County committees are unique to FSA and serve as a direct link between agricultural communities across the country and USDA. For more information on FSA county committees, visit fsa.usda.gov/elections.

Organic and Transitional Education and Certification Program

USDA’s Organic and Transitional Education and Certification Program (OTECP) helps to cover certification and education expenses for agricultural producers who are certified organic or transitioning to organic. Certified operations and transitional operations may apply for OTECP for eligible expenses paid during the 2020 and 2021 program years and the program will continue into 2022. Eligible expenses include certification expenses, registration fees for educational events and soil testing as required by the National Organic Program.

Signup for OTECP for 2020 and 2021 is Nov. 8, 2021 through Jan. 7, 2022. Learn more at farmers.gov/otecp.

USDA Provides $1.8 Billion to Offset Market Fluctuations

Agricultural producers who enrolled in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs for the 2020 crop year are receiving $1.8 billion, providing critical support to help mitigate fluctuations in either revenue or prices for certain crops.

FSA is also encouraging producers to contact their local USDA Service Centers to make or change elections and to enroll for 2022, providing future protections against market fluctuations. The election and enrollment period opened on Oct. 18, 2021 and runs through March 15, 2022. 

Ask the Expert: Understanding the U.S. Drought Monitor; a Q&A with Brian Fuchs

In this Ask the Expert, climatologist Brian Fuchs answers questions about the U.S. Drought Monitor and how it relates to USDA and supports agricultural producers. Brian is part of the team at the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln that manages the drought map. The drought monitor is an online, weekly map showing the extent and severity of drought across the United States.

Learn more about the U.S. Drought Monitor.

Источник: https://www.fsa.usda.gov/state-offices/South-Dakota/index

Biden’s Summit for Democracy: US and India need to look within

Unless these two leading democracies are willing to face the threats to democracy coming from within, the Summit will ring hollow.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been invited by President Joe Biden to participate in the 9-10 December 2021 Summit for Democracy. President Biden envisages this Summit as a centerpiece for placing democracy at the forefront of values guiding US foreign policy, and he would like democracy to be at the forefront of foreign policies around the globe. Indications are that PM Modi will attend this virtual gathering. As the largest democracy in the world, India’s positive participation is vital for the success of the Summit.
The main purpose of the Summit for Democracy is to serve as a counterweight to the ode to the west wind imagery success of the Chinese authoritarian model. India is held out as a rebuttal to Chinese assertions that liberal democracy cannot work for a large developing nation. A credible Indian alternative to the Chinese model is more important now than ever if the decline in democracy throughout the developing world is to be arrested. As the US and India become more cooperative in standing up to authoritarian China, their effectiveness will be enhanced by strengthening their democracies at home as well as those outside their borders.
The chief themes of the Summit are: 1. “defending against authoritarianism”; 2. “addressing and fighting corruption”; and 3. “advancing respect for human rights”. According to the White House, the Summit will galvanize commitments and initiatives concerning these themes. Following a year of consultation, coordination, and action after the Summit, President Biden will invite world leaders to gather once more to showcase progress made against their commitments.
The themes of the Summit are often thought of in terms of defending democracy against international threats. Especially after the collapse of US efforts in developing nations as diverse as Afghanistan, Iraq and Vietnam, the question of how to defend democracy internationally is important. However, major threats to democracy are arising internally in both the United States and India. Unless these two leading democracies are willing to face these threats, the Summit will ring hollow.
Free and fair elections respected secretary of state south dakota election results both winners and losers are vital to “defending against authoritarianism”. India has done a remarkable job through its non-partisan Election Commission of assuring the openness and integrity of its elections. So much so that each time India conducts national elections it is the largest organized activity ever undertaken by mankind and the results are universally respected.
The United States, by contrast, has suffered repeatedly from assaults on its electoral systems. Since 2020, the losing candidate for President has mounted an unprecedented attempt to overthrow election results and undermine faith in elections. Some US political leaders are home savings login contemplating the possibilities for overturning elections secretary of state south dakota election results legislative action at the state or national level. These developments constitute the continuing threat of authoritarianism. The US can learn from India on this issue, and both countries can make commitments at the Summit to promote and defend the rights of citizens to participate in free and fair elections and uphold the sanctity of election results.
The United States and India both have an interest in “addressing and fighting corruption” as a major means of defending democracy. The recent trove of 11.9 million financial records obtained by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and known as the “Pandora papers” shows how serious democracy-threatening corruption is in both India and the United States. Over 300 wealthy Indians are shown as participating in schemes to hide money, while US states like South Dakota and Delaware are shown to be integral to such schemes. “Black money” in combination with non-transparent political contributions threaten democratic political systems. Both the US and India can commit to programs to fight these threats to democracy.
Democracies capable of countering authoritarianism must have systems and programs for “advancing respect for human rights”. Unchecked rule by the majority does not constitute democracy. Unless human rights are protected for all, democracy simply becomes the authoritarianism of the majority. Both the United States and India have grave flaws in their respect for human rights. In the United States, the murders of George Floyd and other African Americans by police have highlighted the problems of the American criminal justice system. In India, the attacks on Muslims and other minorities show there is much to be done in advancing respect for human rights. Both countries can make renewed commitments in the area walmart asurion sign in human rights.
Addressing internal threats to online banking members first credit union are difficult because these threats are so intimately bound up with domestic politics. But addressing these threats is necessary if the Summit for Democracy is to be more than a propaganda exercise. Both the United States and India should be willing to identify flaws in their systems and set forth commitments that will help make more perfect unions in both countries.
Hotels near the london west hollywood E. Vickery, Jr. is Senior Associate, Wadhwani Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies; Senior Advisor, Albright Stonebridge Group; former US Assistant Secretary of Commerce.

Источник: https://www.sundayguardianlive.com/opinion/bidens-summit-democracy-us-india-need-look-within

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