Skip to content

Archives

Central texas state parks


central texas state parks

10 Amazing Texas State Parks · 1. Guadalupe River State Park · 2. Garner State Park · 3. Monument Hill & Kreische Brewery State and Historic Site. Parks & Forests. Nearby Towns & Hotels. For Texas State Park telephone information call 1-800-792-1112. Please note, this does not include all Texas state parks, only the ones we are recommending on this list. How to Find the Best Hiking Trails at Each Park. We.

Central texas state parks -

Best state parks in Texas

#4 - McKinney Falls State Park

Texas

McKinney Falls State Park is located in Austin, Texas, United States at the confluence of Onion Creek and Williamson Creek. Visitors can enjoy a variety of activities including camping, hiking, mountain biking, road biking, picnicking, fishing, and wildlife observation. Swimming is also allowed in Onion Creek. The main attraction at the park is a series of limestone ledges and pools over which Onion Creek flows. One particular site within the park along Onion Creek served as a key crossing point along El Camino Real de los Tejas. The park is named for Thomas F. McKinney who came to Texas in the early 1820s as one of Stephen F. Austin's first 300 colonists. Sometime between 1850 and 1852, McKinney moved to Travis County and to his property on Onion Creek, where he built a large two-story home, stone fences, and the first flour mill in the area. Fees: Adult: $6 Daily Child 12 Years and Under: FreeShow more

Источник: https://www.alltrails.com/us/texas/state-parks

Competitive Park Grants Enhance State Parks Across Texas

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 27, 2018

Media contact: Lydia Saldaña
817.851.5729
[email protected]

Thanks to funding provided by the Meta Alice Keith Bratten Foundation, 12 state parks across Texas will soon be providing enhanced visitor experiences or improved habitat to benefit wildlife. Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation (TPWF) is raising dollars to match the more than $38,000 in funding for the competitive grants.

The winning grants will fund efforts ranging from improving bird blinds at Abilene State Park in West Texas, to improving the amphitheater at Eisenhower State Park in North Texas, to providing trail entrance kiosks at Colorado Bend State Park in Central Texas. All the projects are aimed at providing a higher quality visit for state park visitors. Engaging volunteer labor to provide a non-monetary match for the requested funds is one criteria of the competitive grant.

“This marks the third year of this 3-year year grant cycle, and we are gratified at the enhancements across the state park system that have been made as a result of this funding,” said Adelaide Leavens, president of Meta Alice Keith Bratten Foundation in Fort Worth. “The projects presented by park staff and volunteers are innovative and unique to the attributes of each site, as is evident in this year’s approved projects. I am amazed and inspired by the ingenuity of staff who squeeze every inch of value out of the grant funds while encouraging the dedicated volunteers who bring the projects to life.”

The projects that are funded in the 2018 grant cycle are:

STATE PARKCOUNTYPROJECT
AbileneTaylorBird blind improvements
Colorado BendSan SabaTrail entrance kiosks
Cooper LakeHopkinsGeocaching
Copper BreaksHardemanConstruct bird blinds
Devils RiverVal VerdeRainwater collection and xeriscaping
Dinosaur ValleySomervellOutdoor skills kit
EisenhowerGraysonAmphitheater improvements
GoliadGoliadInvasive species control
Goose IslandAransasInvasive species control
Kickapoo CavernKinney and EdwardsPollinator garden
LockhartCaldwellInvasive species control
Mother NeffCoryellNative prairie restoration

In 2019, the Competitive Park Grants program will be evaluated to determine whether a new grant cycle will be funded in the future.

“State park visitors will be enjoying these enhancements for years to come, and we’re very thankful for the funding that has been provided by the Meta Alice Keith Bratten Foundation over the last there years,” said TPWF Executive Director Anne Brown. “It’s a great example of how philanthropic funding is enhancing the experience for those who love to visit Texas State Parks.”

Donations can be made online HERE

All TPWF news releases available online: www.tpwf.org/news/press-releases/

Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation raises private funds to advance Texas’ proud outdoor traditions and conserve our state’s wildlife, habitat, recreational areas, and natural resources. Since 1991, Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation has raised more than $170 million in private philanthropy to ensure that all Texans, today and in the future, can enjoy the wild things and wild places of Texas.
###

Источник: https://www.tpwf.org/competitive-park-grants-enhance-state-parks-across-texas/

Here's how to beat the post-COVID rush at Texas state parks

After a day exploring one of Texas’s state parks, it’s so much better to crash in a bed. And enjoy a little running water. Some temperature control. Maybe even a touch of luxury.

Here are some parks with accommodations for the not-so-rustic among us:

Bastrop State Park

A decade ago, the worst wildfire Texas has ever seen knocked out 96 percent of this park, but since then conservation efforts and Mother Nature have been committed to restoration. Bastrop is famous for its loblolly pines — those tall skinny trees with reddish brown bark. Seven miles of nature trails and proximity to Austin, Buescher National Park and Lake Bastrop make this park a perfect stop on a central Texas road trip.

Driving time from Houston: Two hours

Accommodations: Though they’re simple and rustic, the cabins in the park, ranging from $110 to $200 a night, offer air conditioning, bathrooms and full kitchens.

Garner State Park

There’s no better way to cool off on a hot Texas day than to grab an inner tube and float down the Frio River. Bring your own tube or rent one in the park at Garner Park Store for $10 per day (plus a $20 deposit that you’ll get back once you return it). In the southwestern stretch of the Hill Country, Garner State Park offers not just tubing but dancing, too; jukebox dances at the gift shop pavillion have been livening up summer nights since the 1940s. Dances happen every night during peak season, Memorial Day to Labor Day, from 8-11 p.m., and the jukebox has plenty of country selections, so get ready to two-step.

Driving time from Houston: Four hours, 48 minutes.

Accommodations: For $150/night, temperature-controlled cabins with fireplaces offer the basics, including bathrooms. These cabins book out before any other accommodations, so plan ahead. You can reserve them five months in advance, to the day.

Palo Duro Canyon State Park

Just outside of Amarillo, the second largest canyon in the United States offers views of colorful banded rock layers, 30 miles of trails and in the summer, TEXAS Outdoor Musical productions in the park’s amphitheater — think actors in period costumes singing and dancing the history of the Panhandle.

Driving time from Houston: Nine hours

Accommodations:For $299 a night, rent one of four rustic-chic glamping sites at the floor of the Canyon and enjoy a fully furnished, canvas-roofed cabin with a dining area, a fire pit, comfortable beds and even a wooden porch swing. You’ll still have to pee in the campgrounds restrooms, but the gorgeous sunrises compensate for that. You can make glamping reservations online and see a calendar with the already-booked dates crossed out.

Big Bend Ranch State Park

The crown jewel of Far West Texas, our largest state park is not only breathtaking during the day, with its bighorn sheep, river lowlands and desert scrub, it’s a designated International Dark Sky Park, so it would be a mistake to leave before nightfall. Stay a while and star-gaze.

Driving time from Houston: 11 hours

Accommodations: In the basin of the Chisos Mountains, the only hotel inside the park, Chisos Mountains Lodge, offers temperature-controlled rooms with bathrooms and amenities. In addition to hotel and motel rooms, five stone cottages rent for $226 a night (plus tax).

Ray Roberts Lake State Park

Three units (or mini parks) — Johnson, Isle du Bois and Greenbelt Park — surround this 29,000-acre lake, making up the Ray Roberts Lake State Park system. The lake is a dream for anglers hoping to catch a largemouth bass (It’s not impossible to reel in a 15-pounder). Equestrians enjoy the 12 miles of Greenbelt Corridor along the Trinity River designated for horseback riders.

Driving time from Houston: Four hours, 34 minutes

Accommodations: A far cry from camping, Lone Star Lodge and Marina, though nine miles from Isle du Bois, is the only game in town for those who don’t want to pitch a tent. With lake views from the back patio, it’s not just a place to crash but a popular wedding venue. Rooms are $109 plus tax year-round and you can book as far ahead as one year.

Davis Mountains State Park

Known as a birding paradise and an oasis from West Texas summer heat, this smaller and lesser known alternative to Big Bend offers high desert trails and a chance to see javelinas.

Driving time from Houston: 8.5 hours

Accommodations: This state park is worth a visit just to stay at the white adobe-walled Indian Lodge, a hotel inside the park that’s been there since the 1930s. Today it even has a swimming pool. Both Indian Lodge and the campsites fill up fast, but you can make reservations up to five months in advance.

Brazos Bend State Park

Wildlife-lovers flock to Brazos Bend to check out the swampy wetlands and woodlands and hang with alligators, armadillos and a limpkin. Hiking trails showcase live oak trees and Spanish moss.

Driving time from Houston: 53 minutes

Accommodations: The most popular accommodations are the RV campsites, but for $65 a night, you can rent the one and only cabin. Book it five months in advance, especially for peak season from September to early June. It has air conditioning, heat and a bunk bed frame, but you’ll have to bring your own bedding and walk to the nearby restrooms.

Источник: https://www.chron.com/life/travel/article/texas-state-parks-camp-book-stay-16532949.php

Premiere of the Panhandle: Texas State Parks

From mesquite-covered valleys to majestic red cliffs, Texas state parks in the Panhandle Plains region run the gamut of outdoor activities. Cast a fishing line, hike a canyon trail, stare at a star-soaked night sky, or watch the buffalo roam. All that and much more awaits, so pack up the camping gear and experience both the tranquility and the thrills of outdoor living in the Lone Star State.

You wake to the sounds of a gentle wind rustling the boughs of an ancient oak tree. Outside, light creeps across a vast, tree-lined lake. Coffee in hand, you plan your day—hiking, fishing, mountain biking? Or just sit for a while and watch a prehistoric-looking horny toad crawl up a rock to bask in the sun.

With a scene like that, chances are you’re in a Texas state park. There are over 90 of them to choose from, offering a wide range of activities, camping options, and historic sites. However, some of the most intriguing, and some that are downright unique, are scattered across the Panhandle Plains region.

The Panhandle

For a camping trip last year, we decided to explore beyond our usual Hill Country or coastal destinations. It was time to boldly go where we hadn’t been before. That’s how the four of us ended up in the Texas Panhandle at Palo Duro Canyon State Park. Called the “Grand Canyon of Texas,” it’s the second largest in the country.

“Breathtaking” was the only word for it. Standing on the rim of the canyon, we saw miles of red sandstone cliffs—layers from the Permian and Triassic periods clearly visible. The Lighthouse Rock is a prominent feature, and we immediately agreed to hike out the next day for an up-close photo op. Right then, however, it was late afternoon, so I suggested we find the cabin I’d called to reserve a few months before (thankfully, as the cabins are very popular).

One of six built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s, our sturdy cabin was made of stone quarried from around the area. Inside, there were two bedrooms, one bathroom, a microwave, and a mini-fridge. We had dinner on the outside picnic table—hot dogs cooked on the grill—and watched the sun set. The night sky turned out with more and brighter stars than I’d ever seen, including the light-soaked path of the Milky Way.

Next morning, we stopped at the Trading Post on the canyon floor to get trail snacks and water for our hike. A backpacker there told us about Caprock Canyons State Park, about 90 miles to the southeast. He said it was not quite as large, but stunning nonetheless, with the same rust-colored mesas. He’d hiked a good share of the 90 miles of trails and had caught his dinner—a trout—at the park’s Lake Theo. I learned that Caprock is also home to the state’s Official Bison Herd, which roams 700 acres of grasslands.

The Plains

Impressed as we’d been with Palo Duro Canyon, we later made subsequent trips to other notable parks in the Panhandle Plains region. Copper Breaks, just south of the Oklahoma border, is an excellent spot to commune with nature, both on foot and on horseback. Hiking a trail through the backcountry, we saw mule deer, prairie dogs, some wild turkeys, and a turtle. That evening, we were met with an even more brilliant sky than we’d seen over Palo Duro and discovered that Copper Breaks has been designated an International Dark Sky Park.

Two of the state parks in the region boast beautiful lakes—Lake Arrowhead and Possum Kingdom Lake. Lake Arrowhead is great for fishing, with a nine-lane boat ramp, a lighted fishing pier, and a floating dock. Scuba diving is popular at Possum Kingdom because of the lake’s astoundingly clear blue water.

On this trip, our friends had brought their son, so we made a special stop at Fort Richardson. More than just a state park, it’s a history lesson as well. Back in 1867, a good number of settlers were migrating west through this area of Texas. To protect them from increasingly frequent Indian attacks by the Kiowa and Comanche, Fort Richardson was established with a post hospital, commissary, guardhouse, and officers’ quarters.

All of those original buildings still exist, and to the delight of our 10-year-old travel partner, we got to tour them all, hearing stories about what life was like way back when. The park has hike-and-bike trails, too, and Quarry Lake for fishing and swimming. The “Limited Cabin” we’d reserved had all the necessities (minus linens and pillows, which we’d brought along) and a welcome extra: air-conditioning.

Having learned more about the CCC-era state parks, I wanted to visit another I’d heard good things about, Abilene State Park. Rich in pecan, red oak, and cottonwood trees, the park has one of the most beautiful structures built by the Corps—a water tower with an observation deck and a swimming pool. Constructed of red brick with arches and a pavilion, it was solidly designed and, to this day, provides visitors with a great way to end a day of fishing at Buffalo Wallow Pond, hiking, and wildlife viewing.

The other reason I wanted to go to Abilene State Park was for the yurts. A unique feature at this park, yurts were first designed by nomads in Central Asia. They are round, canvas-covered structures with floors, and the ones at the park, unlike the yurts of ancient times, had bunk beds, a pull-out sofa, and a microwave inside, with picnic tables, a fire ring, and a water spigot outside. We were cozy and comfy on that cool night and look forward to “yurting” again next year.

FUN FACT
While Caprock Canyons has the Official Bison Herd, the official longhorns live at Copper Breaks State Park, just outside the city of Quanah. Back in the 1930s, a wealthy Texas businessman was worried about dwindling populations of this Texas icon, so he spearheaded an effort to bring the herd to Copper Breaks. At periodic shows supervised by the park rangers, you can pet, feed, and even kiss a longhorn (by holding a pellet of food in your lips and allowing the animal to come and get it).

Источник: https://www.traveltexas.com/articles/post/premiere-of-the-panhandle-texas-state-parks/

Texas State Parks to waive entry fees in honor of Veterans Day

TEMPLE, Texas — Texas State Parks will waive entrance fees for all day-use visitors in honor of Veterans Day on Nov. 14, according to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 

“The dedication, sacrifice and service displayed by the women and men that serve in our country’s military is unparalleled and is a source of pride throughout the country,” said Rodney Franklin, Director of Texas State Parks. “To celebrate their service, Texas State Parks would like to once again invite everyone to spend the day at any one of our beautiful State Parks for free.  I am glad that we are able to encourage families to get outside in honor of our veterans.”     

Texas State Park officials encourage interested visitors to reserve their day passes in advance because some parks are expected to reach their capacity limit.

Passes can be reserved online here, or over the phone at (512) 389-8900. 

When purchasing a hunting and fishing license, buyers can add a donation of $1, $5, $10 or $20 to help support the Veterans Commission’s Veterans Assistance Fund.

Donations to the Texas Veterans Commission Fund for Veterans’ Assistance (FVA) program provide grants to veteran service organizations and nonprofit charitable institutions that assist veterans and their families at the community level throughout Texas.

Источник: https://www.kcentv.com/article/news/local/texas-state-parks-waive-entrance-fees-in-honor-of-veterans-day/500-913ba3cf-1661-47c4-8754-2d903be01e37

The best national and state parks in Texas, according to Condé Nast Traveler

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park is in central Texas about 50 miles west of Austin in the Texas Hill Country. The park protects the birthplace, home, ranch, and final resting place of Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th President of the United States.

You can tour the grounds of Johnson's boyhood home in Johnson City, then drive 14 miles to the LBJ Ranch and Texas White House, where you can drive past his birthplace, a show barn, a small schoolhouse, and the Texas White House (which is temporarily closed to indoor tours due to structural issues).

"As you make the rounds, imagine the former president, known for pulling pranks on his guests – like the time he loaded dignitaries into a vehicle, rolled it down a hill and into a pond, hollering that the brakes had given out. He didn't tell them it was an amphibious vehicle, designed to drive on roads and float in the water," Condé Nast stated.

It is about an hour and 30 minutes north of San Antonio. 

Источник: https://www.mysanantonio.com/lifestyle/travel-outdoors/article/The-best-national-and-state-parks-in-Texas-16455635.php
central texas state parks

We Love our State Parks!

Image of sunrise over a beautiful field of bluebonnets in central Texas with the words April is Texas State Parks Month at Whole Earth Provision Co. on top

 

 

 

As Texans, when we head outdoors for rest and recreation, we're blessed with a dizzying number of possible destinations: Big Bend, the Caprock and Rio Grande Canyonlands, Enchanted Rock, the Piney Woods, prairies, beaches, springs, mountains, lakes and the desert. And thanks to Texas State Parks, we can visit these magical places anytime and share in the beauty and grandeur of wild and historic Texas.

 

Whole Earth Provision Co. is a longtime supporter of our Texas State Parks. So ten years ago when our Parks were facing budget cuts and even the threat of some Park closures, we created Central texas state parks is Texas State Parks Month. We combined the proceeds from our Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour shows in Austin with an in-store fund drive. Our nine year total of funds raised for the Parks now stands at over $250,000! These funds are used to help with day-to-day Park operational expenses, including visitor programs and maintaining Park facilities.

 

Image of a Texas State Parks Gift CardThis year, during the month of April, Whole Earth customers can make donations to Texas State Parks in our stores. For a $20 or more donation, customers receive a $5 Texas State Parks gift card, good for fees or purchases at any Texas State Park. For a $50 or more donation, customers receive a Whole Earth branded Nalgene 32oz bottle and a $5 Texas State Parks gift card. For a $100 donation or more, receive an exclusive Ft. Lonesome custom Texas Patch, the Nalgene water bottle, and the gift card, while supplies last. Donations are gratefully accepted in any amount. (Sorry, we cannot accept online donations for Texas State Parks at this time.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Image of the green and white Texas Parks and Wildlife Logo with the words Life's Better Outside underneath

 

.

Image with the words Ranger Day

 

 

 

Be sure to stop by your favorite Whole Earth store on Sunday, April 25th, from 2 to 4 pm for Meet the Rangers! Texas State Park Rangers will be in Whole Earth stores to answer your questions about where to go and what to do in the Parks. They have inside knowledge, and they're ready to share. Are you wondering if being a Park Ranger could be your dream job? Ask the Rangers! We know one Whole Earthling who found his true calling talking to the Rangers on a Sunday afternoon. We hope you’ll bring your questions and join us for this fun event.

 

And while you're in our stores, don't forget to pick up your free copy of the State Park Guide. This handy, informative booklet includes descriptions of all the Parks, their amenities and activities, arranged by region, with a fold out map of Texas highlighting the Parks. The Facilities and Activities Index makes it easy to find the Parks with particular features like cabins, equestrian facilities, fishing, kayak rentals and much, much more. Get your copy and start planning your next getaway!

 

 



Источник: https://www.wholeearthprovision.com/info/texas-state-parks-month

Top 10 state and national parks in Texas

Big Bend national park and Big Bend state park

Everything is big in Texas, including the state's crown jewel, Big Bend national park and the adjoining Big Bend state park. Together the parks protect an area of Chihuahuan desert larger than the state of Rhode Island, tucked into a 90-degree curve in the Rio Grand river, along the Mexican border.

Big Bend is a place of contrasts: hot in the summer and frigid in the winter, the terrain ranges from dry open desert to jagged mountains to the riparian river valley, a unique landscape that supports a diversity of plants and animals. Big Bend is also home to some big predators, including Mexican black bears and around two dozen mountain lions, but the rugged landscape provides plenty of roaming room and dangerous encounters with visitors are extremely rare.

As the largest expanse of public land in Texas, Big Bend is a hiker's paradise with more than 200 miles of trails offering everything from short, sweet day hikes to multi-week epics. Horseback riding is also popular, as are float trips down the Rio Grande. The park offers three developed campsites, backcountry camping permits and accommodation at the Chisos Bank of america canada contact Lodge in the heart of the park.

Top tip: Big Bend is located along a major migration pathway for hundreds of species of birds. Many northern species spend winters in the park, while birds from the tropics flock to the Rio Grande in the spring to mate and raise their young. Some species, like the Colima warbler, are found nowhere else in the US, making Big Bend a life-list destination for avid bird watchers.

Guadalupe Mountains national park

Today Texas is mostly desert, but the landscape hasn't always been so dry. Around 265 million years ago, during the Permian period, this region was covered by a vast tropical sea, home to a massive 400-mile long coral reef. Over walmart asurion sign in, portions of this reef were preserved and uplifted into the Guadalupe Mountains, one of the finest examples of a fossilised reef found anywhere on Earth.

This dramatic and fossil-rich reef is protected within the boundaries of Guadalupe Mountains national park in west Texas, just south of the New Mexican border, near another area highlight: Carlsbad Caverns national park. In the mid 1800s a stagecoach line called the Butterfield Overland Mail Trail ran right through the park on its way to El Paso, delivering mail, goods and passengers over 2,800 miles in 25 days between the east coast and California. The historic ruins of the old stage station can be reached via an easy 0.3-mile trail that leaves from the Pine Springs Visitor Center.

Guadalupe offers two developed campgrounds, as well as backcountry camping permits, but there are no does wayfair do monthly payments, gas stations, grocery stores or overnight lodging options in the remote park. The closest town with food, ice, showers and hotel rooms is 35 miles east in White's City, New Mexico.

Top tip: For the biggest views in Texas, hike to the state's highest point: 2,667-metre Guadalupe Peak. A trail from the Pine Springs campground winds up more than 900 metres of elevation in 4.2 miles to the top of the Lone Star state, marked by a metal pyramid. The hike can be completed year round.

Hueco Tanks state historic site

Just east of El Paso, lies the rock-climbing's mecca of Hueco Tanks. Here, bouldering aficionados – climbers who seek to ascend low, challenging routes without ropes – from all over the world gather to grab the unique hand holds formed by Hueco's "tanks", the small water-carved depressions pitting the rocks.

These miniature water catchments have attracted people for millennia, some of whom left their mark in the form of thousands of pictographs painted on to the rocks depicting dancing figures, people with elaborate headdresses, birds, jaguars, deer and symbols of rain, lightning and corn. The most famous images are of masks or face designs. Hueco Tanks boasts the largest number of mask paintings in North America, with more than 200 identified throughout the park.

Due to the rock art's historical value and fragility, access to Hueco Tanks is restricted. Visitors must make reservations to access the North Mountain area, which is limited to 70 people per day, or hire a certified guide to explore other areas of the park. Even if you're not a world-class rock climber, the park also offers hiking, bird watching and camping. Bunk beds and private rooms are also available nearby at the Hueco Rock Ranch, operated by the American Alpine Club.

Top tip: Peak climbing season runs from October to March, with an annual Hueco Rock Rodeo held in February. Climbers from all over the world show up to compete and take part in instructional clinics. Spectators welcome.

Palo Duro Canyon state park

Nicknamed the Grand Canyon of Texas, Palo Duro Canyon cuts through the heart of the Panhandle just south of Amarillo. Roughly 60 miles long, up to 20 miles wide in places and around 244 metres deep, Palo Duro is the second largest canyon in the country and its intricate geologic layers and steep, colourful walls, do bear some resemblance to its bigger, grander counterpart in Arizona.

People have lived in this spectacular landscape for millennia, occupying the resource-rich canyon floor continuously for at least 12,000 years. The Apache, Comanche and Kiowa tribes fought many battles over the valuable territory before they were finally evicted in the 1870s and moved to reservations in Oklahoma.

Today the park caters to horseback riders, with more than 1,500 acres devoted to equestrian-only trails. But you don't have to be a cowboy to enjoy the scenery: 17,000 acres of the huge park is crisscrossed with paths for hikers and mountain bikers. Keep an eye out for Longhorn steers that graze along the rim of the canyon, part of the official Texas state longhorn herd. Camping is available in tent and RV sites, and a small number of primitive cabins are available for nightly rentals, reservations recommended.

Top tip: During the summer months, an outdoor musical drama called simply "TEXAS" lights up the Pioneer Amphitheater in the park on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. As the official play of the state of Texas, the family-friendly show depicts the trials and triumphs faced by the settlers of the Panhandle.

Caprock Canyons state park and Trailway

Just south of the showier Palo Duro lies the quieter, but no less lovely, Caprock Canyons state park. The park straddles the Caprock Escarpment: spectacular 305-metre red sandstone cliffs that form the natural transition between the high, flat plains to the west and the lower rolling plains to the east.

This transition zone has long supported a diversity of life, including now extinct mammoths, North American camels and giant bison. Today, the park is home amazon music account payment the Texas state bison herd, among the few genetically pure plains bison in the country that have not been crossbred with domestic cattle.

Located in the Panhandle, 100 miles southeast of Amarillo, Caprock Canyons offers tent and RV camping, along with backcountry sites for overnight trips. Boating, fishing and swimming are popular on 120-acre Lake Theo. Mountain bike and horse rentals are also available. More than 90 miles of trails run through the park and up the towering red cliffs, affording stunning view of the famous Texas Llano Estacado landscape.

Top tip: The Trailway is a 64-mile hiking, biking and equestrian trail that runs through the park following the abandoned Fort Worth and Denver Railroad line between Estelline and the South Plains. The trail passes through three counties, across 46 bridges and through the Clarity Tunnel, home to a half-million Mexican free-tailed bats during the summer months.

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area

Rising above the plains west of Austin is a giant 150-metre-high dome of pink granite, the second largest of its kind in the country. Enchanted rock has graced this landscape for an estimated one billion years, making this some of the oldest exposed rock on Earth. Known to geologists as a monadnock – an isolated mountain – Enchanted Rock is visible for miles and has attracted people to its base and rounded summit for as long regional finance locations 12,000 years.

Enchanted Rock comes with its fair share of legends, many inspired by the odd creaking and groaning sometimes heard coming from the dome. Geologists say the sounds come from the outer layers of rock contracting and expanding with changing temperatures, but the Tonkawa and Comanche Indians feared and revered the rock and continue to conduct ceremonies and leave offerings at its base to this day.

Enchanted Rock is primarily a day-use park, though a number of primitive and backcountry campsites are available to visitors willing to hike to their pitch. RV's are not permitted. The dome is popular with rock climbers, who flock to its Yosemite-like rock. A number of local guide services, based out of Austin and nearby Fredericksburg and Dripping Springs, specialise in getting both newbies and experts up on the dome.

Top tip: You don't have to be a hardcore climber to reach the top of Enchanted Rock. A 0.6-mile walking trail runs from the base up to the rounded summit. Parts of the trail are steep and the rock can be slippery when wet, but the short, spectacular hike is well worth the effort for the 360-degree views.

Padre Island national seashore

Texas isn't all dry, flat plains. The state also boasts 350 miles of coastline along the Gulf of Mexico. Much of the shore has been developed, but a few sections of wild, pristine coast remain. One of the best stretches is Padre Island national seashore, which protects the longest undeveloped stretch of barrier island in the world: a narrow, 70-mile long spit of dunes and tidal flats teeming with sea life.

Padre Island's most famous residents are Kemp's ridley sea turtles, one of the rarest sea turtles in the world. Female turtles central texas state parks from all over the Atlantic Ocean to lay their eggs at only two beaches: Rancho Nuevo in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas and on Padre Island each summer between April and mid-July. In 1978 a programme was launched to rescue the Kemp's ridley turtles from the brink of extinction due to overfishing and accidental entanglements in shrimping nets. In 2013, more than 10,500 hatchlings were released along the Texas coast in the hope that many will survive and return to Padre Island to lay their eggs.

Bird watching is also popular on the island, as the spit is located along the Central Flyway, a major migratory route. Upwards of 380 species have been documented within the park, nearly half the total number of species that live in North America.

Top tip: Stay in one of the national seashore's five campgrounds and catch sunrise over the Gulf of Mexico.

Lost Maples State Natural Area

Along the Sabinal river in south-central Texas is a forest unlike any other in Texas. Here a stand of bigtooth maples grow far from of their usual range. These trees aren't strays, but rather ancient central texas state parks, left over from the cooler, wetter climate of the last Ice Age.

For most of the year, Lost Maples state natural area, near Vanderpool, is a quiet wooded haven, offering hiking trails, bird watching and camping, but from late October into November, the maples, along with sycamores, chinkapin, lacey and Texas red oaks, erupt in a show of fall colours that attract hundreds of visitors a day.

People have been drawn new mexico bank and trust mortgage the Sabinal river and the Lost Maples area for thousands of years. The site is famous for preserving an archaeological artefact known as an atlatl: a spear-throwing tool wielded by the Native Americans of south Texas between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago.

Top tip: The park posts "fall foliage reports" on their website during the peak leaf season. Weekends can get crowded and parking is limited so aim to visit on a weekday. Cabin rentals are available in nearby Vanderpool.

Longhorn Caverns state park

Texas is renowned for its limestone caves, thanks to its ancient aquatic history when it lay submerged under a shallow inland sea. Impressive caves can be found all over the state, but few have the colourful history of Longhorn Caverns near Burnet. Here ice age animals once took refuge, then later Central texas state parks Americans, pioneer settlers, Confederate soldiers, bootleggers and outlaws all took turns calling the cave home. In the 1920s, during Prohibition, the main underground room served as a secret speakeasy, dance hall and concert venue.

Today Longhorn Caverns is a state park, offering daily cave tours for novice potholers along with wild cave tours for those willing to squeeze their way through smaller underground passages to unique, rarely seen cave formations. Once a month the park hosts an overnight paranormal tour. Longhorn Caverns maintains a steady temperature of 20C (68F) year round, making this a cool option during the hot summer months.

There is no camping in Longhorn Caverns, but Inks Lake state park up the road offers RV and tent camping, along with primitive cabin rentals. Those who prefer to stay above ground can walk Longhorn's Backbone Ridge Nature trail.

Top tip: The Wild Cave tour takes more adventurous visitors on a two-hour underground journey that calls for climbing, crawling and squeezing through narrow passages. Required protective equipment such as helmets, elbow and knee pads can be rented from central texas state parks park. Tours take place most Saturdays throughout the year. Reservations highly recommended.

Zilker Metropolitan Park

Nestled in the heart of Austin, the 350-acre Zilker Metropolitan park is one of the most beloved open spaces in all of Texas. In Zilker park, you can hike, bike, canoe, play polo, and marvel at the botanic garden, all within the city limits of the Lone Star state's capital.

Austin has long enjoyed a reputation as the most vibrant city in Texas, and is the self-proclaimed "Live Music Capital of the World". Zilker Park has hosted a number of music festivals and famous acts, including the annual Austin City Limits festival and a legendary Rolling Stones concert in 2006 that was recorded for their live album The Biggest Bang.

When the park isn't being taken over by music festivals, it's an urban oasis, offering everything from quiet walks to train rides to Shakespeare. Stroll along Lady Bird Lake, canoe or kayak on the Colorado River, picnic on the lush green grass, check out the Zilker Hillside Theater, or the Zilker Zephyr mini-railway, or the Austin Nature & Science Center, all within the bounds of the park.

Top tip: Texas can central texas state parks sweltering hot so it's no wonder that the Barton Springs Pool in Zilker park is one of Austin's most popular attractions. This three-acre pool, fed from underground springs, averages 21C (70F) and is open to the public year-round.

Mary Caperton Morton is a freelance writer and photographer who makes her home on the back roads of North America, living and working out of a tiny solar-powered Teardrop camper. How to calculate arm mortgage payments her travels at theblondecoyote.com

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/apr/02/top-10-national-parks-texas

Best state parks in Texas

#4 - McKinney Falls State Park

Texas

McKinney Falls State Park is located in Austin, Texas, United States at the confluence of Onion Creek and Williamson Creek. Visitors can enjoy a variety of activities including camping, hiking, mountain biking, road biking, picnicking, fishing, and wildlife observation. Swimming is also allowed in Onion Creek. The main attraction at the park is a series of limestone ledges and pools over which Onion Creek flows. One particular site within the park along Onion Creek served as a key central texas state parks point along El Camino Real de los Tejas. The park is named for Thomas F. McKinney who came to Texas in the early 1820s as one of Stephen F. Austin's first 300 colonists. Sometime between 1850 and 1852, McKinney moved to Travis County and to his property on Onion Creek, where he built a large two-story home, stone fences, and the first flour mill in the area. Fees: Adult: $6 Daily Child 12 Years and Under: FreeShow more

Источник: https://www.alltrails.com/us/texas/state-parks

Here's how to beat the post-COVID rush at Texas state parks

After a day exploring one of Texas’s state parks, it’s so much better to crash in a bed. And enjoy a little running water. Some temperature control. Maybe even a touch of luxury.

Here are some parks with accommodations for the not-so-rustic among us:

Bastrop State Park

A decade ago, the worst wildfire Texas has ever seen knocked out 96 percent of this park, but since then conservation efforts and Mother Nature have been committed to restoration. Bastrop is famous for its loblolly pines — those tall skinny trees with reddish brown bark. Seven miles of nature trails and proximity to Austin, Buescher National Park and Lake Bastrop make this park a perfect stop on a central Texas road trip.

Driving time from Houston: Two hours

Accommodations: Though they’re simple and rustic, the cabins in the park, ranging from $110 to $200 a night, offer air conditioning, bathrooms and full kitchens.

Garner State Park

There’s no better way to cool off on a hot Texas day than to grab an inner tube and float down the Frio River. Bring your own tube or rent one in the park at Garner Park Store for $10 per day (plus a $20 deposit that you’ll get back once you return it). In the southwestern stretch of the Hill Country, Garner State Park offers not just tubing but dancing, too; jukebox dances at the gift shop pavillion have been livening up summer nights since the 1940s. Dances happen every night during peak season, Memorial Day to Labor Day, from 8-11 p.m., and the jukebox has plenty of country selections, so get ready to two-step.

Driving time from Houston: Four hours, 48 minutes.

Accommodations: For $150/night, temperature-controlled cabins with fireplaces offer the basics, including bathrooms. These cabins book out before any other accommodations, so plan ahead. You can reserve them five months in advance, to the day.

Palo Duro Canyon State Park

Just outside of Amarillo, the second largest canyon in the United States offers views of colorful banded rock layers, 30 miles of trails and in the summer, TEXAS Outdoor Musical productions in the park’s amphitheater — think actors in period costumes singing and dancing the history of the Panhandle.

Driving time from Houston: Nine hours

Accommodations:For $299 a night, rent one of four rustic-chic glamping sites at the floor of the Canyon and enjoy a fully furnished, canvas-roofed cabin with a dining area, a fire pit, comfortable beds and even a wooden porch swing. You’ll still have to pee in the campgrounds restrooms, but the gorgeous sunrises compensate for that. You can make glamping reservations online and see a calendar with the already-booked dates crossed out.

Big Bend Ranch State Park

The crown jewel of Far West Texas, our largest state park is not only breathtaking during the day, with its bighorn sheep, river lowlands and desert scrub, it’s a designated International Dark Sky Park, so it would be a mistake to leave before nightfall. Stay a while and star-gaze.

Driving time from Houston: 11 hours

Accommodations: In the basin of the Chisos Mountains, the only hotel inside the park, Chisos Mountains Lodge, offers temperature-controlled rooms with bathrooms and amenities. In addition to hotel and motel rooms, five stone cottages rent for $226 a night (plus tax).

Ray Roberts Lake State Park

Three units (or mini parks) — Johnson, Isle du Bois and Greenbelt Park — surround this 29,000-acre lake, making up the Ray Roberts Lake State Park system. The lake is a dream for anglers hoping to catch a largemouth bass (It’s not impossible to reel in a 15-pounder). Equestrians enjoy the 12 miles of Greenbelt Corridor along the Trinity River designated for horseback riders.

Driving time from Houston: Four hours, 34 minutes

Accommodations: A far cry from camping, Lone Star Lodge and Marina, though nine miles from Isle du Bois, is the only game in town for those who don’t want to pitch a tent. With lake views from the back patio, it’s not just a place to crash but a popular wedding venue. Rooms are $109 plus tax year-round and you can book as far ahead as one year.

Davis Mountains State Park

Known as a birding paradise and an oasis from West Texas summer heat, this smaller and lesser known alternative to Big Bend offers high desert trails and a chance to see javelinas.

Driving time from Houston: 8.5 hours

Accommodations: This state park is worth a visit just to stay at the white adobe-walled Indian Lodge, a hotel inside the park that’s been there since the 1930s. Today it even has a swimming pool. Both Indian Lodge and the campsites fill up fast, but you can make reservations up to five months in advance.

Brazos Bend State Park

Wildlife-lovers flock to Brazos Bend to check out the swampy wetlands and woodlands and hang with alligators, armadillos and a limpkin. Hiking trails showcase live oak trees and Spanish moss.

Driving time from Houston: 53 minutes

Accommodations: The most popular accommodations are the RV campsites, but for $65 a night, you can rent the one and only cabin. Book it five months in advance, especially for peak season from September to early June. It has air conditioning, heat and a bunk central texas state parks frame, but you’ll have to bring your own bedding and walk to the nearby restrooms.

Источник: https://www.chron.com/life/travel/article/texas-state-parks-camp-book-stay-16532949.php

Best State Parks & Recreation Areas Near Austin

Austin is surrounded by incredible parks and outdoor recreation areas. With rolling green meadows, wide open spaces, giant cypress and oak trees throughout the countryside and along creeks, limestone cliffs, rocky riverbeds, rivers, lakes and caves, Central Texas has some of the most diverse landscapes and ecosystems in the state. Here are a few of our favorite parks showcasing the best of the Hill Country that surrounds Austin.

waterfall at McKinney Falls State Park In Austin, TX
McKinney Falls State Park. Courtesy of Texas Parks and Wildlife.

McKinney Falls State Park

15 minutes from Downtown Austin
Just 13 miles from downtown Austin, McKinney Falls State Park is a great escape that’s just minutes away. Onion Creek flows through the state park, creating McKinney Falls and beautiful pools of water among giant boulders. There are nine miles of hiking trails within McKinney Falls State Park, allowing for shorter and longer strolls among the land. Other activities at the state park include fishing, bouldering, biking, and geocaching. The park also offers camping, with all 81 campsites featuring electricity and water hookups.

Emma Long Metropolitan Park

25 minutes from Downtown Austin
Emma Long Metropolitan Park is a 25-minute drive from downtown Austin, but it’s still inside of city limits—making it one of very few places folks can camp within the city. Located on Lake Austin, the park has a plethora of amenities for visitors, ranging from volleyball courts to fishing piers to 12 miles of hiking and biking trails. Day-use areas make it a great place to spend a sunny day, whether you prefer picnicking, swimming on the sandy shores, walking the park’s trails, boating on the Colorado River.

View of people Paddle boarding on the Colorado River from a Cliff in Bastrop Texas
The Colorado River in Bastrop. Courtesy of Visit Bastrop.

Bastrop State Park & The Lost Pines

40 minutes from Downtown Austin
About 30 miles east of Austin, Bastrop, Texas, has many unique features, in particular its loblolly pines, which area also known as the "Lost Pines." These pines have long been an important feature of this landscape, much of which was destroyed in a devastating fire in 2011. Nonetheless, many pines survived and Bastrop State Park has undergone many restoration efforts since then. The 12-mile Park Road 1C allows visitors the opportunity to drive or bike directly through the state park, which gives a great glimpse into the unique vegetation. The park also features seven miles of hiking trails, fishing on Lake Mina, and has a pool that’s open May through September, which is a great for a camping weekend.

Lockhart State Park

40 minutes from Downtown Austin
Step outside and get some fresh air at Lockhart State Park. Spend a nice day golfing on the historic golf course, swimming in the on-site pool, drop a line in the water at Clear Fork Creek, and snap ‘grams at the waterfall. There’s also a short but difficult hiking trail—the Persimmon—that’s worth lacing up some boots for.

Women walks with hiking stick on trail at Lockhart State Park near Austin Texas
Lockhart State Park. Courtesy of Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Reimers Ranch Park

40 minutes from Downtown Austin
Reimers Ranch Park offers world-class climbing and so much more. Nestled along the same tract of land where Hamilton Pool also resides, Reimers Ranch is also close to the Pedernales River. There are trails for hiking, mountain biking, and equestrian use, while guests can also swim and fish in the Pedernales River. Unique to Reimer’s Ranch, however, is its observatory equipped with two large telescopes and monthly bird walks the first Saturday of each month from April through October.

Palmetto State Park

1 hour from Downtown Austin
With a forest of tropical palmetto plants, towering trees, and green swamps, Palmetto State Park looks like land you’d find in the Deep South. Instead, it’s in the heart of Texas, just an hour southeast of Austin. The landscape and terrain is very unusual—and the only place of its kind in the state of Texas. With the number of marshes and swamps, water activities are common here, in particular, tubing, canoeing, and fishing. On-land, you can explore several miles of trails by foot or on bike. Even more, experienced paddlers can access Palmetto State Park by way of a seven-hour journey from Luling, Texas (home to the annual Watermelon Thump).

People hiking around rock formations at Pedernales Falls State Park near Austin Texas
Pedernales Falls State Park. Courtesy of Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Pedernales Falls State Park

1 hour from Downtown Austin
The iconic Pedernales River flows through Texas Hill Country west of Austin. With limestone cliffs, giant boulders, waterfalls, and a limestone river bed, the river is one of the most scenic in the state. The namesake Pedernales Falls State Park offers miles and miles of hiking trails, ranging from easy hikes to incredible overlooks to backcountry trails that are best suited for experienced hikers. The waterfalls are one of the park’s biggest draws, but visitors can also geocache, birdwatch, mountain bike, stargaze, camp, and, of course, swim (but only in designated areas). With many activities and land uses, Pedernales Falls State Parks makes creating a weekend of an adventure easy.

Colorado Bend State Park

1 hour and 45 minutes from Downtown Austin
Colorado Bend State Park is bisected by the Colorado River, free small business checking account california it features countless activities on both the land and water. With 35 miles of multiuse trails, primitive camping, fishing, swimming, paddling, birding, caving and even guided tours, visiting this piece of land is worth the 1 hour and 45-minute drive. Visitors can explore the park and the Colorado River on their own, or hire a guide to visit the park’s Gorman Falls or its underground caves. Offering much more than the average park, Colorado Bend State Park offers terrain with an opportunity for wild adventure.

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area at night with stars In Austin, TX
Enchanted Rock State Natural Area. Credit Chase Fountain, courtesy of Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area

1 hour and 45 minutes from Downtown Austin
Enchanted Rock is a giant pink granite dome that seems to rise out of nowhere, with Texas Hill Country’s quintessential green hills surrounding the massive rock formation. This unique element in the midst of a much different landscape has attracted visitors for thousands of years. Because of its position high above the surrounding lands, Enchanted Rock is a wonderful place to watch sunrises and to stargaze. With camping allowed, it’s a wonderful place to spend the day hiking *and *call it a night. There are 11 miles of trails, including the direct trail to the dome’s summit, but many more miles that are less frequented as well.

Insider Tip: The state parks listed above all offer Ranger programs, in which guides lead programs that dive into everything from geocaching to birding. You’ll also find Junior Ranger programs that gives kids the opportunity to explore and learn in the state parks. You do *not *need a license to fish from the shore within a state park—many of also offer equipment to lend out.

Contributed by RootsRated.

Источник: https://www.austintexas.org/austin-insider-blog/post/the-best-state-parks-and-recreation-areas-near-austin/

The best national and state parks in Texas, according to Condé Nast Traveler

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park is in central Texas about 50 miles west of Austin in the Texas Hill Country. The park protects the birthplace, home, ranch, and final resting place of Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th President of the United States.

You can tour the grounds of Johnson's boyhood home in Johnson City, then drive 14 miles to the LBJ Ranch and Texas White House, where you can drive past his birthplace, a show barn, a small schoolhouse, and the Texas White House (which is temporarily closed to indoor tours due to structural issues).

"As you make the rounds, imagine central texas state parks former president, known for pulling pranks on his guests – like the time he loaded dignitaries into a vehicle, rolled it down a hill and into a pond, hollering that the brakes had given out. He didn't tell them it was an amphibious vehicle, designed to drive on roads and float in the water," Condé Nast stated.

It is about an hour and 30 minutes north of San Antonio. 

Источник: https://www.mysanantonio.com/lifestyle/travel-outdoors/article/The-best-national-and-state-parks-in-Texas-16455635.php

Premiere of the Panhandle: Texas State Parks

From mesquite-covered valleys to majestic red cliffs, Texas state parks in the Panhandle Plains region run the gamut of outdoor activities. Cast a fishing line, hike a canyon trail, stare at a star-soaked night sky, or watch the buffalo roam. All that and much more awaits, so pack up the camping gear and experience both the tranquility and the thrills of outdoor living in the Lone Star State.

You wake to the sounds of a gentle wind rustling the boughs of an ancient oak tree. Outside, light creeps across a vast, tree-lined lake. Coffee in hand, you plan your day—hiking, fishing, mountain biking? Or just sit for a while and watch a prehistoric-looking horny toad crawl up a rock to bask in the sun.

With a scene like that, chances are you’re in a Texas state park. There are over 90 of them to choose from, offering a wide range of activities, camping options, and historic sites. However, some of the most intriguing, and some that are downright unique, are scattered across the Panhandle Plains region.

The Panhandle

For a camping trip last year, we decided to explore beyond our usual Hill Country or coastal destinations. It was time to boldly go where we hadn’t been before. Gate city property management how the four of us ended up in the Texas Panhandle at Palo Duro Canyon State Park. Called the “Grand Canyon of Texas,” it’s the second largest in the country.

“Breathtaking” was the only word for it. Standing on the rim of the canyon, we saw miles of red sandstone cliffs—layers from the Permian and Triassic periods clearly visible. The Lighthouse Rock is a prominent feature, and we immediately agreed to hike out the next day for an up-close photo op. Right then, however, it was late afternoon, so I suggested we find the cabin I’d called to reserve a few months before (thankfully, as the cabins are very popular).

One of six built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s, our sturdy cabin was made of stone quarried from around the area. Inside, there were two bedrooms, one bathroom, a microwave, and a mini-fridge. We had dinner on the outside picnic table—hot dogs cooked on the grill—and watched the sun set. The night sky turned out with more and brighter stars than I’d ever seen, including the light-soaked path of the Milky Way.

Next morning, we stopped at the Trading Post on the canyon floor to get trail snacks and water for our hike. A backpacker there told us about Caprock Canyons State Park, about 90 miles to the southeast. He said it was not quite as large, but stunning nonetheless, with the same rust-colored mesas. He’d hiked a good share of the 90 miles of trails and had caught his dinner—a trout—at the park’s Lake Theo. I learned that Caprock is also home to the state’s Official Bison Herd, which roams 700 acres of grasslands.

The Plains

Impressed as we’d been with Palo Duro Canyon, we later made subsequent trips to other notable parks in the Panhandle Plains region. Copper Breaks, just south of the Oklahoma border, is an excellent spot to commune with nature, both on foot and on horseback. Hiking a trail through the backcountry, we saw mule deer, prairie dogs, some wild turkeys, and a turtle. That evening, we were met with an even more brilliant sky than we’d seen over Palo Duro and discovered that Copper Breaks has been designated an International Dark Sky Park.

Two of the state parks in the region boast beautiful lakes—Lake Arrowhead and Possum Kingdom Lake. Lake Arrowhead is great for fishing, with a nine-lane boat ramp, a lighted fishing pier, and a floating dock. Scuba diving is popular at Possum Kingdom because of the lake’s astoundingly clear blue water.

On this trip, our friends had brought their son, so we made a special stop at Fort Richardson. More than just a state park, it’s a history lesson as well. Back in 1867, a good number of settlers were migrating west through this area of Texas. To protect them from increasingly frequent Indian attacks by the Kiowa and Comanche, Fort Richardson was established with a post hospital, commissary, guardhouse, and officers’ quarters.

All of those original buildings still exist, and to the delight of our 10-year-old travel partner, we got to tour them all, hearing stories about what life was like way back when. The park has hike-and-bike trails, too, and Quarry Lake for fishing and swimming. The “Limited Cabin” we’d reserved had all the necessities (minus linens and pillows, which we’d brought along) and a welcome extra: air-conditioning.

Having learned more about the CCC-era state parks, I wanted to visit another I’d heard good things about, Abilene State Park. Rich in pecan, red oak, and cottonwood trees, the park has one of the most beautiful structures built by the Corps—a water tower with an observation deck and a swimming pool. Constructed of red brick with arches and a pavilion, it was solidly designed and, to this day, provides visitors with a great way to end a day of fishing at Buffalo Wallow Pond, hiking, and wildlife viewing.

The other reason I wanted to go to Abilene State Park was for the yurts. A unique feature at this park, yurts were first designed by nomads in Central Asia. They are round, canvas-covered structures with floors, and the ones at the park, unlike the yurts of ancient times, had bunk beds, a pull-out sofa, and a microwave inside, with picnic tables, a fire ring, and a water spigot outside. We were cozy and comfy on that cool night and look forward to “yurting” again next year.

FUN FACT
While Caprock Canyons has the Official Bison Herd, the official longhorns live at Copper Breaks State Park, just outside the city of Quanah. Back in the 1930s, a wealthy Texas businessman was worried about dwindling populations of this Texas icon, so he spearheaded an effort to bring the herd to Copper Breaks. At periodic shows supervised by the park rangers, you can pet, feed, and even kiss a longhorn (by holding a pellet of food in your lips and allowing the animal to come and get it).

Источник: https://www.traveltexas.com/articles/post/premiere-of-the-panhandle-texas-state-parks/

watch the thematic video

Best State Parks of 2019 - Our Favorite Places - Full Time RV - RV Texas Y'all
central texas state parks
central texas state parks

Comments

  1. ഇതുപോലെ കഴിഞ്ഞ വർഷവും ഞാൻ GDS അപേക്ഷിച്ചിരുന്നു. എനിക്ക് SSLC ക്ക് 79% മാർക്ക് ഉണ്ട്. പക്ഷെ ജോലി കിട്ടിയില്ല. ഇതിന്റെ ഒരു റിസൾട്ട് വന്നപ്പോൾ അതിൽ SSLC ക്ക് 90% മുകളിൽ ഉള്ളവരുടെ നാലോ അഞ്ചോ പേരുടെ ലിസ്റ്റ് മാത്രമേ ഓരോ ജില്ലയിൽ നിന്നും ഉള്ളു. ഇതിന്റെ റിസൾട്ട് വന്നപ്പോൾ അതിനെ പറ്റി തൊഴിൽ വാർത്തയിൽ പോലും ഉണ്ടായിരുന്നില്ല

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *