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Judy holliday filmography


judy holliday filmography

devoted entirely to the multi-talented entertainer, Judy Holliday. "Billie Dawn" in the 1950 film "Born Yesterday", Judy was also an established and. She appeared in several films during the 1950s. She was noted for her performance on Broadway in the musical Bells Are Ringing, winning a Tony Award for Best. Judy Holliday's films include Adam's Rib, Born Yesterday, Bells Are Ringing, It Should Happen to You.

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Born Yesterday (Judy Holliday, 1950) - Gin Rummy

Judy holliday filmography -

10 Blu-ray releases

Judy Holliday was the most lovable comedienne of her generation. Her Kewpie doll voice and a heart as big as Yankee Stadium gave depth and poignancy to her archetypal “dumb blonde” roles, while her glowing personality refashioned the stereotype. Her career was launched and nurtured by George Cukor. In her first major role, in Cukor’s Adam’s Rib (1949), she plays an oppressed young wife who shoots her philandering husband. Early in the film, Holliday’s attorney (Katharine Hepburn) visits her in prison, and Cukor films this remarkable scene in one unbroken five-minute take, with Hepburn facing away from the motionless camera, favoring Holliday and her bravura performance. In Cukor’s Born Yesterday (1950), a clever reworking of the Pygmalion theme, her priceless work as the malaprop-mouthing mistress of a crooked junk tycoon who discovers that the Rights of Man also apply to women earned her a Best Actress Oscar (she beat out perhaps the toughest competition in history: Gloria Swanson in Sunset Boulevard and Bette Davis in All About Eve).

The most audacious of Holliday’s films with Cukor is The Marrying Kind (1952), which deals with the breakup of a blue-collar marriage; it starts off as a light romantic comedy, then veers into drama. The style was innovative, a sort of American neorealism, marked by graceful New York location shooting, and Holliday gave the finest, most rounded performance of her career. (This marvelous picture was widely picketed by the American Legion, who smeared Holliday as “pinko.”)

Holliday’s later movies with other directors are forgettable, except for Vincente Minnelli’s lively Bells Are Ringing (1960). She’s a force of nature here, indulging in her bent for unrelieved shtick as the answering-service operator who doubles as a good fairy. Though not a major Minnelli musical, it’s a work of expert craftsmanship. One of the highlights of the score is Holliday’s rendition of Jule Styne’s touching ballad “The Party’s Over.” The party was over for good for Judy Holliday—Bells was the last movie of her sadly abbreviated career. She died of cancer in 1965.

Источник: https://www.villagevoice.com/2006/08/15/judy-holliday-the-smart-dumb-blonde/

George Cukor remade his career in miniature with Judy Holliday

Adam’s Rib, a 1949 sorta-romantic comedy about feuding married lawyers who take opposite sides of a criminal case, was the seventh of ten collaborations between actress Katharine Hepburn and director George Cukor. It was also the third of five collaborations between Cukor and actor Spencer Tracy and the fifth of nine films to feature the famous Hepburn/Tracy duo. Yet the movie’s striking opening scene features neither Hepburn nor Tracy; it follows the character Doris Attinger as she tails her husband and discovers, as she has suspected, that he is cheating on her. The scene isn’t played for farcical laughs; it’s not unlike something out of Pickup On South Street, as Doris tails her husband into the subway and reveals that she’s carrying a handgun. There’s a comic note as she consults a handbook on how to use the weapon, but traces of zaniness disappear when she does, in fact, shoot her husband (albeit non-fatally). Her crime of passion will subsequently divide the lawyers played by Hepburn and Tracy, providing the engine for a relatively genteel (if thoughtful) romantic-matrimony comedy.

Doris is played by Judy Holliday, who receives the first close-up in Adam’s Rib (and several more after that) before taking a backseat to the two stars. Holliday may not be as closely associated with Cukor as Hepburn and Tracy, if only because she hasn’t ascended to her costars’ level of iconography. Holliday is singular enough for that kind of honor: Most of her characters maintain her signature high-pitched voice, wear similarly shortish, semi-curled blonde hairdos, and have at least a few occasions to flash a room-lighting smile. But there’s also something wonderfully unglamorous about Holliday, even when she’s decked out in beautiful gowns. She often has the dazed look of someone who doesn’t entirely realize that she’s turning on the charm. Plenty of performers become stars by appearing effortless; Holliday sometimes appears so effortless that she couldn’t possibly go after that movie-star brass ring.

Beyond that, she only made about a dozen features. Cukor directed Holliday in her first credited one, Winged Victory, and her four major roles that followed, starting with Adam’s Rib. After her run with Cukor, which also included Born Yesterday (1950), The Marrying Kind (1952), and It Should Happen To You (1954), she made only four more films before dying of breast cancer at the age of 43, in 1965.

Her four films with Cukor are a big part of her career—and really just a few drops in the bucket of his, a studio-system epic spanning over 40 features (averaging at least one a year, sometimes more, during the ’40s and ’50s) including a number of beloved classics: The Philadelphia Story, My Fair Lady, The Women, Little Women, A Star Is Born, Gaslight, Adam’s Rib, and Born Yesterday. It would be difficult, then, to argue that Holliday helped Cukor as much as vice versa; Cukor, Hepburn, and Tracy practically conspired to break Holliday into feature films. But when a filmmaker does work as varied and numerous as Cukor, a star as specific and idiosyncratic as Holliday can provide a clear point of departure, if only for a few years at a time.

Born Yesterday, which would have been Cukor’s follow-up to Adam’s Rib if he didn’t slip a Lana Turner drama in the middle, represents a particular peak for both parties—one classic that wouldn’t be on Cukor’s CV without Holliday. She reprised a role she first played on stage, and won a Best Actress Oscar for it, while Cukor made perhaps his best-loved movie of the ’50s, one of his last classics before a final triumph over a decade later.

Holliday’s first line in Born Yesterday, repeated several times throughout the film, is a nasal, honking “WHAAAT,” shouted out of a window by Billie Dawn (Holliday) in response to her uncouth boyfriend Harry Brock (Broderick Crawford). Brock has come to Washington, D.C., to make some sleazy business deals with politicians, and quickly becomes worried that Billie will embarrass him in meetings. He hires Paul Verrall (William Holden), a local reporter, to “smooth the rough edges off,” not realizing the two will fall in love. To the movie’s credit, it doesn’t play coy with this development; it seems to happen almost immediately, which fits in with some of Cukor’s other romantic comedies, which often (though not always) follow characters who are essentially already in love with each other.

The attempted refinement of a brassy dame has been a durable plot for works of art from Pygmalion to The House Bunny; Cukor himself took another crack when he adapted the Pygmalion-based musical My Fair Lady for the screen in 1964, and won an Oscar for his trouble. Born Yesterday distinguishes itself both with Cukor’s direction and Holliday’s starmaking performance. Cukor’s aesthetic respects the film’s (and his) theatrical roots—a fair portion of it is long dialogue scenes taking place in a hotel room—while taking advantage of his cinematic confidence and skill with actors. Holliday, with her squawky New York voice, is very funny as Billie, but she plays notes of melancholy, too. The way she mumbles at the ends of sentences implies that she’s not accustomed to being taken seriously, or maybe even heard at all, creating the distinction between Billie being dumb and Billie having the curiosity and excitement wrung out of her by a lousy relationship. Her dizzy-dame shtick doesn’t register as shtick at all—it’s more grounded and less confident than traditional screwball.

Cukor gets on Holliday’s wavelength, slowing down the movie around the half-hour mark in a scene where Billie and Harry play gin, with long pauses for card-flipping and dealing until Harry finally reiterates his point about Billie needing more sophistication—and Billie waiting some more before offering her rebuttal. Until that rebuttal, the game plays out in a single take. Of course, movies in Cukor’s era(s) had far fewer cuts than contemporary cinema, but Cukor especially favors the capturing of dialogue—especially one-on-one arguments—in single shots. Adam’s Rib has a number of long conversations that play out in extended takes, although most of them involve Hepburn and Tracy, not Holliday. Holliday would get her own Cukor comedy-of-remarriage picture with The Marrying Kind, only it’s even heavier on the remarriage (Hepburn and Tracy’s relationship never truly seems in doubt) and vastly lighter on the comedy.

The Marrying Kind has even more marriage bona fides in that it was written by the husband-and-wife team of Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin. Kanin had some kind of a hand in all of the major Cukor/Holliday films, having written the screenplay to Adam’s Rib with Gordon and It Should Happen To You on his own, as well as the original stage version of Born Yesterday. The Marrying Kind follows a couple played by Holliday and Aldo Ray as they file for divorce with a judge, and recount the story of their marriage in a series of flashbacks. There’s a certain ironic oddity in the pairing: Holliday was still potentially early in her film career (though as it turned out, not as early as she should have been), and this was Ray’s first big starring role, in contrast with long-standing chemistry enjoyed by the stars of Adam’s Rib. They’re new stars playing regular people who have been through the wringer.

That less-practiced quality is appropriate for the young couple’s innocent beginnings. But Holliday works better as a figure of contrast, and Ray’s lummox-y charisma is sort of the dude version of her (albeit not shining as brightly); their only contrast is in size. As a duo, their mutual weariness takes over, and they seem ill-equipped to help each other, much less deal with the rest of the world. Holliday sounds more tired and marble-mouthed than in Born Yesterday, and rather than giving his newfound star a bubbly showcase, Cukor emphasizes her serious side. One of the film’s most memorable scenes chronicles an argument between Holliday and Ray over an epic three-minute take, with Cukor’s camera coming in and backing out as needed to keep them in the frame as they move.

It’s a knockout on its own, but part of a wearying whole. Cukor didn’t exclusively make comedies, but The Marrying Kind, especially considering its proximity and resemblance to Adam’s Rib, feels lacking in levity. The film is never more than lightly amusing, but takes a particularly grim turn (hinted at earlier) when the couple recounts the drowning death of their son. Cukor stages the scene effectively, with Holliday singing and playing a ukulele in the foreground as a mass of people gathers in a panic in the background, by the lake where their son has gone swimming. But there’s something bloodless and calculated about the melodrama; the child’s death becomes one more obstacle in the way of a happy marriage. It’s not the fault of the performers, especially not Holliday; her rawness briefly makes the anguish believable. But if Cukor takes expert advantage of stagy qualities in Adam’s Rib and Born Yesterday, he succumbs to kitchen-sink melodrama in The Marrying Kind. His ability to ground his comedies doesn’t feel reversible here, where some lightness might have given the movie—and Holliday—more to do.

At the risk of sounding lowbrow, It Should Happen To You is more what audiences might reasonably expect from a Cukor-directed Judy Holliday vehicle. Holliday plays Gladys Glover, a plucky if somewhat discouraged woman from Binghamton, living in Manhattan but recently fired from her job. She rents a billboard over Columbus Circle advertising herself—not as an employee, particularly, but simply her name—and becomes famous as the woman with the name on the sign. This fame complicates her sorta-relationship with filmmaker Pete Sheppard (Jack Lemmon, in his first big role; Holliday, barely out of her own up-and-comer stage, was apparently a magnet for other up-and-comers).

As in Born Yesterday, Holliday plays someone with a tentative grasp of her own worth; she takes childlike pleasure in looking at her name up on a big sign (and later, on several signs all around Manhattan). Most of that pleasure seems purely momentary; Gladys doesn’t seem to aspire to anything more than being known. As far as Cukor leading ladies, Holliday represents a break from the confidence of someone like Katharine Hepburn. Typical Hepburn characters banter and parry, going after what they want; Holliday characters tumble into comebacks, struggle, and trail off.

But Cukor doesn’t use these qualities as an excuse to make his movies daffier; even a relative trifle like It Should Happen To You has a certain moral gravity. Gladys doesn’t exactly say that she wants to be famous for being famous, but that’s exactly what happens to her. It seems prescient today, albeit filtered through some quaint notions that are more of their time, particularly Pete’s extolling the virtues of not standing out from a crowd—and his claim that privacy is what people want most in the world. Though the movie is sympathetic to Gladys, it clearly shares Pete’s concerns (which, to a modern audience, may come off as condescending concern-trolling) and views her story as a cautionary one.

Though Gladys Glover may not represent a mortal threat to our American way of life (no matter how much Lemmon kvetches about her misguided desire), Cukor’s films with Holliday do allow her a surprising sense of rawness and even danger. That’s especially true of her gun-toting first scene in Adam’s Rib, but there’s a more subtle danger even in It Should Happen To You, where her character’s very wants (to see her name on giant signs, irrespective of any particular accomplishment) feel out of whack compared to other rom-com or even screwball heroines. A lot of screwball characters want something understandable and go after it in wacky or unpredictable ways. Holliday isn’t opaque enough to be described as unknowable, but there’s a lack of calculation in her characters that brings them to their unpredictability in ways that feel both natural and, sometimes, a little unnerving.

There’s also something poignant about much of Holliday’s career appearing as a five-year phase toward the end of Cukor’s (he would continue working sporadically through 1981, but only made a half-dozen films, two for television, after winning his Oscar for My Fair Lady). In some ways, his films with Holliday are a Cukor career in miniature: a theatrical adaptation, a drama about marriage, a couple of romantic comedies including a Tracy/Hepburn pairing. Holliday, with her very specific voice and presence, doesn’t necessarily seem like the ideal actor to partner with when creating (intentionally or not) a late-career retrospective of various types of material. But she adapts, by seeming not to adapt at all. “Was that an accident or did you do it on purpose?” a suitor asks Gladys Glover at one point in It Should Happen To You. She responds: “To tell you the truth, I don’t know.” A lot of actors could say that line. But Cukor and Holliday make it sound like the truth.

Next time: An incredibly busy actor buckles down with a self-impressed genius.

Источник: https://www.avclub.com/george-cukor-remade-his-career-in-miniature-with-judy-h-1798245359

Judy Holliday 1921 - 1965



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12 movies
The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956)

I know, I know. But I’ve seen all the other ones! Even Full of Life!

I have, like most right-thinking people, a fondness for the comedies of Judy Holliday, yet somehow I’ve not seen The Solid Gold Cadillac. But now, I shall, as it’s on TCM Thursday, May 16 at 2:15 p.m.

(It should be noted that Born Yesterday is on a few hours earlier at 5:30 a.m., which I’d write about, too, were I not swamped.)

See you here sometime soon after that.

Bell, Book & Candle (1959)

Bell, Book & Candle, the other Jimmy-Stewart-is-mystically-enthralled-and-manipulated-by-Kim-Novak movie, was once a community theatre staple, and the film version is occasionally trotted out as a Christmas movie on technicality, but my love for it (without over-emphasizing a languid, backless and capri-panted Kim Novak) is based in its beatniks.

Oh, movie beatniks, how love you. How I long to attend your nonexistent nightlong barefoot bongo wine party. I cannot explain, but it’s not love if it can be explained. The over-herbed Jack Lemmon fingertip-drumming while French cabaret guy Philippe Clay does…whatever it is he does…is worth the film’s entire budget.

Philippe Clay

Tragique!

The Zodiac is the “kind of a dive” (along with the 30s/40s cinematic idea of the nightclub floor show) that never existed in this form outside the movies, and that I nonetheless pine for quietly in reality. I’m one of the lucky ones: there are plenty of adults we all know who have swallowed a false nostalgia or mistaken the pretty pictures for “historical documents” a la the aliens in Galaxy Quest – but when offered the oddball performance of Clay, the gleeful eccentricities of Elsa Lanchester, Hermione Gingold and, bless him, Ernie Kovacs, the glass on the snowy sidewalk that lets you know what’s happening underground…well, I, if I may momentarily adopt the Liz Lemon vernacular, want to go to there.

Someone clearly decided (rightly) that Kim Novak had a particular chemistry with her main co-star, meaning of course that particular shade of blue-green light that’s used heavily here (the summoning flame, the Pywacket spell before it goes all purple, most of the lights in the Zodiac) and more pointedly in Vertigo the previous year. It’s such an era-specific color, too…

Novak in Vertigo (1958)

Daisy Buchanan, Schmaisy Buchanan.

…which makes for a nice segue into another subgenre affinity I have, perhaps related to my faux-beatnik love: New York ca. 1955-65. It would be easy to call it the Bachelor Pad era (Sunday in New York, Any Wednesday, Boys Night Out, The Apartment), but it’s also the era of The Desk Set, Bells Are Ringing and this lovely little piece. It’s as much about design elements – that shade of blue-green, the look of the apartments and offices, the still-high pants but thinner ties- anything else. I have a reaction to this era that a more susceptible person might take to be proof of reincarnation or spiritual transference (unbeliever though I be in the Carlotta Valdes racket). One might go at least so far as to use a word like “grok,” anyway, if the Liz Lemon thing didn’t work out.

And, like the Zodiac, if that city existed, it’s gone now. But the sets sure are pretty.

——

A postscript about Stewart: most people love him for his charmingly backward romantic speechifying in one American classic or another. For me, it’s for moments like his response to his own failed attempt to hail a taxi in a living room, which ranks above even Gene Wilder’s silent reaction to sheep-love in Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex*.

*that asterisk doesn’t lead anywhere. It’s part of the title.

Tags: bachelor pad films, bell book and candle, classic film, judy holliday, kim novak, looking forward, solid gold cadillac, TCM

Источник: https://ihumblysuggest.wordpress.com/tag/judy-holliday/

Judy Holliday

Judy Holliday was an American actress. Born Judith Tuvim in New York City, she began her career on the stage. Her first movie was Greenwich Village in 1944. She had a few more minor roles, before moving back to New York and the stage.

Her big break came in 1949, with a role in Adam's Rib. The part gave her the chance to star in Born Yesterday the next year, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Holliday was called to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee to explain her Communist links, but the appearance did not blackball her career, unlike the cases of others in the movie business.

In 1956 she starred in The Solid Gold Cadillac and in 1960 in Bells Are Ringing, in the role she had originated on Broadway.

In 1965 she died from breast cancer.

She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6901 Hollywood Blvd.


Note: This profile was written in or before 2004.

Judy Holliday Facts

Selected Filmography

Kindergarten Cop
Bells are Ringing
On the Town
Adam's Rib
Silver Screen Romances
Born Yesterday
That's Dancing!
Jack Lemmon Showcase Volume 1
Источник: https://www.filmbug.com/db/141907

Description:Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 – June 7, 1965) was an American actress. Holliday began her career as part of a night-club act, before working in Broadway plays and musicals. Her success in the 1946 stage production of Born Yesterday as "Billie Dawn" led to her being cast in the 1950 film version, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy. She appeared regularly in film during the 1950s. She was noted for her performance on Broadway in the musical Bells Are Ringing, winning a Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 – June 7, 1965) was an American actress.

Holliday began her career as part of a night-club act, before working in Broadway plays and musicals. Her success in the 1946 stage production of Born Yesterday as "Billie Dawn" led to her being cast in the 1950 film version, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy. She appeared regularly in film during the 1950s. She was noted for her performance on Broadway in the musical Bells Are Ringing, winning a Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical and reprising her role in the 1960 film.

In 1952, Holliday was called to testify before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee to answer claims that she was associated with communism. Although not blacklisted from films, she was blacklisted from radio and television for almost three years.

Holliday died from breast cancer on June 7, 1965, two weeks before her 44th birthday. She was survived by her young son, Jonathan Oppenheim, and by her ex-husband, clarinetist, conductor and educator, David Oppenheim, whom she had married in 1948 and divorced in 1958. She also had a long-term relationship with jazz musician Gerry Mulligan who stayed and supported Judy until her death, but they were never married. Holliday was interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.

Jonathan Oppenheim grew up to become a documentary film editor of note, editing Paris Is Burning, Children Underground, and Arguing the World.

Holliday has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6901 Hollywood Blvd.... (more)(less)

Tags:Born 1921 (4), Died 1965 (4), Cancer (3), American (3), Deceased (3), Died Aged 43 (3), Female (2), Oscar Winner (2), Blonde (2), High Iq (2), Jazz (1), Actress (1), U (1), Oscar Winning Actress (1)

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Источник: https://www.listal.com/judy-holliday
judy holliday filmography
26 DVD releases

7
fans

411
Theatrical
collections

1181
Blu-ray
collections

1142
DVD
collections


Average movie rating



Based on 12 movies and 216 ratings

Highest rated
: 7.3 / 10 Born Yesterday (1950)
Lowest rated
: 6.3 / 10 Too Much Johnson (1938)


Filmography

That's Dancing! (1985)

6.3 9

Bells Are Ringing (1960)

7.2 73

The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956)

6.6 7

The Solid Gold Cadillac

1956

Phffft (1954)

7.2 12

It Should Happen to You (1954)

6.8 22

It Should Happen to You

1954

The Marrying Kind (1952)

6.8 11

Born Yesterday (1950)

7.3 144

Adam's Rib (1949)

7.1 111

Winged Victory (1944)

7.2 2

Something for the Boys (1944)

6.7 2

Something for the Boys

1944

Greenwich Village (1944)

6.8 4

Too Much Johnson (1938)

6.3 14

Источник: https://www.blu-ray.com/Judy-Holliday/111310/

Description:Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 – June 7, judy holliday filmography was an American actress. Holliday began her career as part of a night-club act, before working in Broadway plays and musicals. Her success in the 1946 stage production of Born Yesterday as "Billie Dawn" led to her being cast in the 1950 film temperature in san jose today, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy. She appeared regularly in film during the 1950s. She was noted for her performance on Broadway in the musical Bells Are Ringing, winning a Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 – June 7, 1965) was an American actress.

Holliday began her career as part of a night-club act, before working in Broadway plays and musicals. Her success in the 1946 stage production of Born Yesterday as "Billie Dawn" led to her being cast in the 1950 film version, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy. She appeared regularly in film during the 1950s. She was noted for her performance on Broadway in the musical Bells Ford finance account login Ringing, winning a Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical and reprising her role in the 1960 film.

In 1952, Holliday was called to testify before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee to answer claims that she was associated with communism. Although not blacklisted from films, she was blacklisted from radio and television for almost three years.

Holliday died from breast cancer on June 7, 1965, two weeks before her 44th birthday. She was survived by her young son, Jonathan Oppenheim, and by her ex-husband, clarinetist, conductor and educator, David Oppenheim, whom she had married in 1948 and divorced in 1958. She also had a long-term relationship with jazz musician Gerry Mulligan who stayed and supported Judy until her death, but they were never married. Holliday was interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.

Jonathan Oppenheim grew up to become a documentary film editor of note, editing Paris Is Burning, Children Underground, and Arguing the World.

Holliday has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6901 Hollywood Blvd. (more)(less)

Tags:Born 1921 (4), Died 1965 (4), Cancer (3), American (3), Deceased (3), Died Aged 43 (3), Female (2), Oscar Winner (2), Blonde (2), High Iq (2), Jazz (1), Actress (1), U (1), Oscar Winning Actress (1)

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The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956)

I know, I know. But I’ve seen all the other ones! Even Full of Life!

I have, like most right-thinking people, a fondness for the comedies judy holliday filmography Judy Holliday, yet somehow I’ve not seen The Solid Gold Cadillac. But now, I shall, as it’s on TCM Thursday, May 16 at 2:15 p.m.

(It should be noted that Born Yesterday is on a few hours earlier at 5:30 a.m., which I’d write about, too, were I not swamped.)

See you here sometime soon after that.

Bell, Book & Candle (1959)

Bell, Book & Candle, the other Jimmy-Stewart-is-mystically-enthralled-and-manipulated-by-Kim-Novak movie, was once a community theatre staple, and the judy holliday filmography version is occasionally trotted out as a Christmas movie on technicality, but my love for it judy holliday filmography over-emphasizing lion bank of nigeria plc languid, backless and capri-panted Kim Novak) is based in its beatniks.

Oh, movie beatniks, how love you. How I long to attend your nonexistent nightlong barefoot bongo wine party. I cannot explain, but it’s not love if it can be explained. The over-herbed Jack Lemmon fingertip-drumming while French cabaret guy Philippe Clay does…whatever it is he does…is worth the film’s entire judy holliday filmography alt="Philippe Clay" src="https://ihumblysuggest.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/philippe-clay-l22.jpg?w=490">

Tragique!

The Zodiac is the “kind of a dive” (along with the 30s/40s cinematic idea of judy holliday filmography nightclub floor show) that never existed in this form outside the movies, and that I nonetheless pine for quietly in reality. I’m one of the lucky ones: there are plenty of adults we all know who have swallowed a false nostalgia or mistaken the pretty pictures for “historical documents” a la the aliens in Galaxy Quest – but when offered the oddball performance of Clay, the gleeful eccentricities of Elsa Lanchester, Hermione Gingold and, bless him, Ernie Kovacs, the glass on the snowy sidewalk that lets you know what’s happening underground…well, I, if I may momentarily adopt the Liz Lemon vernacular, want to go to there.

Someone clearly decided (rightly) that Kim Novak had a particular chemistry with her main co-star, meaning of course that particular shade of blue-green light that’s used heavily here (the summoning flame, the Pywacket spell before it goes all purple, most of the lights in the Zodiac) and more pointedly in Vertigo the previous year. It’s such an era-specific color, too…

Novak in Vertigo (1958)

Daisy Buchanan, Schmaisy Buchanan.

…which makes for a nice segue into another subgenre affinity I have, perhaps related to my faux-beatnik love: New York ca. 1955-65. It would be easy to call it the Bachelor Pad era (Sunday in New York, Any Wednesday, Boys Night Out, The Apartment), but it’s also the era of The Desk Judy holliday filmography, Bells Are Ringing and this lovely little piece. It’s as much about design elements – that shade of blue-green, the look of the apartments and offices, the still-high pants but thinner ties- anything else. I have a reaction to this era that a more susceptible person might take to be proof of reincarnation or spiritual transference (unbeliever though I be in the Carlotta Valdes racket). One might go at least so far as to use a word like “grok,” anyway, if the Liz Lemon thing didn’t work out.

And, like the Zodiac, if that city existed, it’s gone now. But the sets sure are pretty.

——

A postscript about Stewart: most people love him for his charmingly backward romantic speechifying in one American classic or another. For me, it’s for moments like his response to his own failed attempt to hail a taxi in a living room, which ranks above even Gene Wilder’s silent reaction to sheep-love in Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex*.

*that asterisk doesn’t lead anywhere. It’s part of the title.

Tags: bachelor pad films, bell book and candle, classic film, judy holliday, kim mens usa customer service phone number, looking forward, solid gold cadillac, TCM

Источник: https://ihumblysuggest.wordpress.com/tag/judy-holliday/

judy holliday movies list

Judy Holliday was also the most dynamic, engaging musical comedy star of her generation. judy holliday* 8/8 6_37-1_4=5_33 {1LRN_1LRW} Walmart asurion sign in. Her success in the 1946 stage production of Born Yesterday as "Billie Dawn" led to her being cast in the 1950 film version, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden … Judy Holliday - Rent Movies and TV Shows on DVD and Blu-ray. Although her life was cut tragically short by cancer, actress/singer Judy Holliday managed significant accomplishments in a career that lasted 25 years and included both Academy and Tony Awards. Her body of work is relatively small: significant roles in eight feature films, three Broadway plays, and two stage musicals, plus occasional recordings, radio and television … No late fees. I think Judy Holliday still “Burns Brightly” and will always be remembered as a Kick-Ass Popular Front Jewish Liberal Lady!! Fast, free delivery. Holliday began her career as part of a night-club act, before working in Broadway plays and musicals. That makes her only movie musical, Bells Are Ringing, one to treasure. Judy Holliday, black victoria secret pink leggings won an Oscar and a niche in theatrical history for her performance as the junk dealer’s squeaky-voiced girl friend in “Born Yesterday,” died Monday of cancer. Description: Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 – June 7, 1965) was an American actress. To place an order or for customer service, call toll-free 1-800-336-4627 or outside the United States, call 1-610-649-7565 Judy Holliday is the girl-next-door type with a very versatile voice, a judy holliday filmography genius with whom a lot of people are not familiar. For Judy Holliday, being listed in Red Channels was a prelude to being called before a government committee. Born Yesterday is a 1950 American comedy-drama film directed by George Cukor, based judy holliday filmography the 1946 stage play of the same name by Garson Kanin.The screenplay was credited to Albert Mannheimer.According to Kanin's autobiography, Cukor did not like Mannheimer's work, believing it lacked much of the play's value, so he approached Kanin about adapting a screenplay from … Whenever I do presentations on the History of Fashion in Film, some of the most fascinating facts to audiences are the sizes of their favorite classic cinema stars.As a result, I put together a chart with many of the actresses we know and love. Complete song listing of Judy Holliday on OLDIES.com. You'll see that this particular list is organized from shortest to tallest, and it also includes their approximate weight and … 1-month free trial! TV Shows. She was 43. In 1952, Judy Holliday was summoned by Senator Pat McCarran’s Internal Security Subcommittee (the Senate’s version of HUAC) to answer questions about her association with the groups listed in her Red Channels entry. She died at a very young age, but left us several movies which I consider some of the best to be seen. Release Calendar DVD & Blu-ray Releases Top Rated Movies Most Popular Movies Browse Movies by Genre Top Box Office Showtimes & Tickets Showtimes & Tickets In Theaters Coming Soon Coming Soon Movie News India Movie Spotlight. Movies.

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Источник: http://www.yorkrepair.com/b18nn/yqvgq/article.php?tag=judy-holliday-movies-list

Judy Holliday was the most lovable comedienne of her generation. Her Kewpie doll voice and a heart as big as Yankee Stadium gave depth and poignancy to her archetypal “dumb blonde” roles, while her glowing personality refashioned the stereotype. Her career was launched and nurtured by George Cukor. In her first major role, in Cukor’s Adam’s Rib (1949), she plays an oppressed young wife who shoots her philandering husband. Early in the film, Holliday’s attorney (Katharine Hepburn) visits her in prison, and Cukor films this remarkable scene in one unbroken five-minute take, with Hepburn facing away from the jose cuervo red sangria margarita camera, favoring Holliday and her bravura performance. In Cukor’s Born Yesterday (1950), a clever reworking of the Pygmalion theme, her priceless work as the malaprop-mouthing mistress of a crooked junk tycoon who discovers that the Rights of Man also apply to women earned her a Best Actress Oscar (she beat out perhaps the toughest competition in history: Gloria Swanson in Sunset Boulevard and Bette Davis in All About Eve).

The most audacious of Holliday’s films with Cukor is The Marrying Kind (1952), which deals with the breakup of a blue-collar marriage; it starts off as a light romantic comedy, then veers into drama. The style was innovative, a sort of American neorealism, marked by graceful New York location shooting, and Holliday gave the finest, most rounded performance of her career. (This marvelous picture was widely picketed by the American Legion, who smeared Holliday as “pinko.”)

Holliday’s later movies with other directors are forgettable, except for Vincente Minnelli’s lively Bells Are Ringing (1960). She’s a force of nature here, indulging in her bent for unrelieved shtick as the answering-service operator who doubles as a good fairy. Though not a major Minnelli musical, it’s a work of expert craftsmanship. One of the highlights of the score is Holliday’s rendition of Jule Styne’s touching ballad “The Party’s Over.” The party was over for good for Judy Holliday—Bells was the last movie of her sadly abbreviated career. She died of cancer in 1965.

Источник: https://www.villagevoice.com/2006/08/15/judy-holliday-the-smart-dumb-blonde/

Judy Holliday Movies…

OK, OK… I know that this is the Cozy Mystery Site… BUT>>> I just have to share one of my favorite Hollywood Star’s Movies with all of you: Judy Holliday!

I am writing this entry to let people know about Judy Holliday’s movies. I started introducing Holliday’s movies to my husband about a year ago, not sure if he would like them. They herald back to a simpler time… A time when close-ups of two lovers kissing didn’t involve camera”men” looking for the angle that showed the judy holliday filmography open-mouthed gymnastics. A time when a man and a woman were called “a boy and girl” and “first base” involved holding hands, “second base” involved the “boy” yawning in his theater seat so that his arm could go around the “girl’s” shoulder. (It turned out that my husband liked Holliday’s movies so much, that I then introduced my daughter to them! She also likes them a lot.)

It really is difficult for me to decide which of her (few) movies is my favorite. My husband’s favorite is Born Yesterday, in which she plays a ditsy blond against William Holden’s portrayal of an up-right journalist who is tutoring her so that she won’t embarrass her gruff criminal boyfriend (Broderick Crawford). The times were much more discreet back then… Holliday’s character had her own wing on the hotel floor that accommodated the boyfriend’s entourage.

My daughter’s favorite Holliday movie is Adam’s Rib. For all of you Katherine Hepburn/Spencer Tracy fans, this is the movie which pits them against each other as prosecuting and defense lawyers in a case involving a two-timing husband (Tom Ewell) who is shot by his long-suffering wife (Holliday). This comedy was directed by George Cukor and also includes David Wayne as the Hepburn’s/Tracy’s next door neighbor, a playboy who has his sights on Hepburn.

As for me, I really can’t decide. I think that I simply like everything that Judy Holliday was in… I love the two judy holliday filmography, but also rank It Should Happen to You, The Solid Gold Cadillac,  Bells Are Ringing, and The Marrying Kind right up there with them. (The Marrying Kind is a little more “adult”>>> but nothing like what “adult” means today!) It Should Happen to You debuts Jack Lemmon as Gladys Glover’s (Judy Holliday’s) rooming house’s neighbor who has to compete with the dashing good looks of a very tan, rich Peter Lawford. Bells Are Ringing shows just how truly talented Holliday was, pitting her against Dean Martin in this musical movie…

Judy Holliday is the girl-next-door type with a very versatile voice, a comic genius with whom a lot what is the routing number for renasant bank people are not familiar. She died at a very young age, but left us several movies which I consider some of the best to be seen.

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Источник: https://cozy-mystery.com/blog/judy-holliday-movies/

Judy Holliday judy holliday filmography 1921 - 1965



ACTRESS


Romance

Musical

Drama

Short

Documentary

12 movies

Judy holliday filmography -

10 Blu-ray releases
The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956)

I know, I know. But I’ve seen all the other ones! Even Full of Life!

I have, like most right-thinking people, a fondness for the comedies of Judy Holliday, yet somehow I’ve not seen The Solid Gold Cadillac. But now, I shall, as it’s on TCM Thursday, May 16 at 2:15 p.m.

(It should be noted that Born Yesterday is on a few hours earlier at 5:30 a.m., which I’d write about, too, were I not swamped.)

See you here sometime soon after that.

Bell, Book & Candle (1959)

Bell, Book & Candle, the other Jimmy-Stewart-is-mystically-enthralled-and-manipulated-by-Kim-Novak movie, was once a community theatre staple, and the film version is occasionally trotted out as a Christmas movie on technicality, but my love for it (without over-emphasizing a languid, backless and capri-panted Kim Novak) is based in its beatniks.

Oh, movie beatniks, how love you. How I long to attend your nonexistent nightlong barefoot bongo wine party. I cannot explain, but it’s not love if it can be explained. The over-herbed Jack Lemmon fingertip-drumming while French cabaret guy Philippe Clay does…whatever it is he does…is worth the film’s entire budget.

Philippe Clay

Tragique!

The Zodiac is the “kind of a dive” (along with the 30s/40s cinematic idea of the nightclub floor show) that never existed in this form outside the movies, and that I nonetheless pine for quietly in reality. I’m one of the lucky ones: there are plenty of adults we all know who have swallowed a false nostalgia or mistaken the pretty pictures for “historical documents” a la the aliens in Galaxy Quest – but when offered the oddball performance of Clay, the gleeful eccentricities of Elsa Lanchester, Hermione Gingold and, bless him, Ernie Kovacs, the glass on the snowy sidewalk that lets you know what’s happening underground…well, I, if I may momentarily adopt the Liz Lemon vernacular, want to go to there.

Someone clearly decided (rightly) that Kim Novak had a particular chemistry with her main co-star, meaning of course that particular shade of blue-green light that’s used heavily here (the summoning flame, the Pywacket spell before it goes all purple, most of the lights in the Zodiac) and more pointedly in Vertigo the previous year. It’s such an era-specific color, too…

Novak in Vertigo (1958)

Daisy Buchanan, Schmaisy Buchanan.

…which makes for a nice segue into another subgenre affinity I have, perhaps related to my faux-beatnik love: New York ca. 1955-65. It would be easy to call it the Bachelor Pad era (Sunday in New York, Any Wednesday, Boys Night Out, The Apartment), but it’s also the era of The Desk Set, Bells Are Ringing and this lovely little piece. It’s as much about design elements – that shade of blue-green, the look of the apartments and offices, the still-high pants but thinner ties- anything else. I have a reaction to this era that a more susceptible person might take to be proof of reincarnation or spiritual transference (unbeliever though I be in the Carlotta Valdes racket). One might go at least so far as to use a word like “grok,” anyway, if the Liz Lemon thing didn’t work out.

And, like the Zodiac, if that city existed, it’s gone now. But the sets sure are pretty.

——

A postscript about Stewart: most people love him for his charmingly backward romantic speechifying in one American classic or another. For me, it’s for moments like his response to his own failed attempt to hail a taxi in a living room, which ranks above even Gene Wilder’s silent reaction to sheep-love in Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex*.

*that asterisk doesn’t lead anywhere. It’s part of the title.

Tags: bachelor pad films, bell book and candle, classic film, judy holliday, kim novak, looking forward, solid gold cadillac, TCM

Источник: https://ihumblysuggest.wordpress.com/tag/judy-holliday/

Movies. I think Judy Holliday still “Burns Brightly” and will always be remembered as a Kick-Ass Popular Front Jewish Liberal Lady!! Judy Holliday was also the most dynamic, engaging musical comedy star of her generation. Although her life was cut tragically short by cancer, actress/singer Judy Holliday managed significant accomplishments in a career that lasted 25 years and included both Academy and Tony Awards. Judy Holliday, who won an Oscar and a niche in theatrical history for her performance as the junk dealer’s squeaky-voiced girl friend in “Born Yesterday,” died Monday of cancer. Whenever I do presentations on the History of Fashion in Film, some of the most fascinating facts to audiences are the sizes of their favorite classic cinema stars.As a result, I put together a chart with many of the actresses we know and love. For Judy Holliday, being listed in Red Channels was a prelude to being called before a government committee. 1-month free trial! TV Shows. Born Yesterday is a 1950 American comedy-drama film directed by George Cukor, based on the 1946 stage play of the same name by Garson Kanin.The screenplay was credited to Albert Mannheimer.According to Kanin's autobiography, Cukor did not like Mannheimer's work, believing it lacked much of the play's value, so he approached Kanin about adapting a screenplay from … That makes her only movie musical, Bells Are Ringing, one to treasure. Judy Holliday - Rent Movies and TV Shows on DVD and Blu-ray. Judy Holliday is the girl-next-door type with a very versatile voice, a comic genius with whom a lot of people are not familiar. You'll see that this particular list is organized from shortest to tallest, and it also includes their approximate weight and … Complete song listing of Judy Holliday on OLDIES.com. Her success in the 1946 stage production of Born Yesterday as "Billie Dawn" led to her being cast in the 1950 film version, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress and the Golden … Holliday began her career as part of a night-club act, before working in Broadway plays and musicals. Description: Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 – June 7, 1965) was an American actress. judy holliday* 8/8 6_37-1_4=5_33 {1LRN_1LRW} Menu. No late fees. She was 43. Release Calendar DVD & Blu-ray Releases Top Rated Movies Most Popular Movies Browse Movies by Genre Top Box Office Showtimes & Tickets Showtimes & Tickets In Theaters Coming Soon Coming Soon Movie News India Movie Spotlight. In 1952, Judy Holliday was summoned by Senator Pat McCarran’s Internal Security Subcommittee (the Senate’s version of HUAC) to answer questions about her association with the groups listed in her Red Channels entry. To place an order or for customer service, call toll-free 1-800-336-4627 or outside the United States, call 1-610-649-7565 She died at a very young age, but left us several movies which I consider some of the best to be seen. Fast, free delivery. Her body of work is relatively small: significant roles in eight feature films, three Broadway plays, and two stage musicals, plus occasional recordings, radio and television …

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Источник: http://uri-news.de/0pujp6fx/judy-holliday-movies-list

Judy Holliday was the most lovable comedienne of her generation. Her Kewpie doll voice and a heart as big as Yankee Stadium gave depth and poignancy to her archetypal “dumb blonde” roles, while her glowing personality refashioned the stereotype. Her career was launched and nurtured by George Cukor. In her first major role, in Cukor’s Adam’s Rib (1949), she plays an oppressed young wife who shoots her philandering husband. Early in the film, Holliday’s attorney (Katharine Hepburn) visits her in prison, and Cukor films this remarkable scene in one unbroken five-minute take, with Hepburn facing away from the motionless camera, favoring Holliday and her bravura performance. In Cukor’s Born Yesterday (1950), a clever reworking of the Pygmalion theme, her priceless work as the malaprop-mouthing mistress of a crooked junk tycoon who discovers that the Rights of Man also apply to women earned her a Best Actress Oscar (she beat out perhaps the toughest competition in history: Gloria Swanson in Sunset Boulevard and Bette Davis in All About Eve).

The most audacious of Holliday’s films with Cukor is The Marrying Kind (1952), which deals with the breakup of a blue-collar marriage; it starts off as a light romantic comedy, then veers into drama. The style was innovative, a sort of American neorealism, marked by graceful New York location shooting, and Holliday gave the finest, most rounded performance of her career. (This marvelous picture was widely picketed by the American Legion, who smeared Holliday as “pinko.”)

Holliday’s later movies with other directors are forgettable, except for Vincente Minnelli’s lively Bells Are Ringing (1960). She’s a force of nature here, indulging in her bent for unrelieved shtick as the answering-service operator who doubles as a good fairy. Though not a major Minnelli musical, it’s a work of expert craftsmanship. One of the highlights of the score is Holliday’s rendition of Jule Styne’s touching ballad “The Party’s Over.” The party was over for good for Judy Holliday—Bells was the last movie of her sadly abbreviated career. She died of cancer in 1965.

Источник: https://www.villagevoice.com/2006/08/15/judy-holliday-the-smart-dumb-blonde/

George Cukor remade his career in miniature with Judy Holliday

Adam’s Rib, a 1949 sorta-romantic comedy about feuding married lawyers who take opposite sides of a criminal case, was the seventh of ten collaborations between actress Katharine Hepburn and director George Cukor. It was also the third of five collaborations between Cukor and actor Spencer Tracy and the fifth of nine films to feature the famous Hepburn/Tracy duo. Yet the movie’s striking opening scene features neither Hepburn nor Tracy; it follows the character Doris Attinger as she tails her husband and discovers, as she has suspected, that he is cheating on her. The scene isn’t played for farcical laughs; it’s not unlike something out of Pickup On South Street, as Doris tails her husband into the subway and reveals that she’s carrying a handgun. There’s a comic note as she consults a handbook on how to use the weapon, but traces of zaniness disappear when she does, in fact, shoot her husband (albeit non-fatally). Her crime of passion will subsequently divide the lawyers played by Hepburn and Tracy, providing the engine for a relatively genteel (if thoughtful) romantic-matrimony comedy.

Doris is played by Judy Holliday, who receives the first close-up in Adam’s Rib (and several more after that) before taking a backseat to the two stars. Holliday may not be as closely associated with Cukor as Hepburn and Tracy, if only because she hasn’t ascended to her costars’ level of iconography. Holliday is singular enough for that kind of honor: Most of her characters maintain her signature high-pitched voice, wear similarly shortish, semi-curled blonde hairdos, and have at least a few occasions to flash a room-lighting smile. But there’s also something wonderfully unglamorous about Holliday, even when she’s decked out in beautiful gowns. She often has the dazed look of someone who doesn’t entirely realize that she’s turning on the charm. Plenty of performers become stars by appearing effortless; Holliday sometimes appears so effortless that she couldn’t possibly go after that movie-star brass ring.

Beyond that, she only made about a dozen features. Cukor directed Holliday in her first credited one, Winged Victory, and her four major roles that followed, starting with Adam’s Rib. After her run with Cukor, which also included Born Yesterday (1950), The Marrying Kind (1952), and It Should Happen To You (1954), she made only four more films before dying of breast cancer at the age of 43, in 1965.

Her four films with Cukor are a big part of her career—and really just a few drops in the bucket of his, a studio-system epic spanning over 40 features (averaging at least one a year, sometimes more, during the ’40s and ’50s) including a number of beloved classics: The Philadelphia Story, My Fair Lady, The Women, Little Women, A Star Is Born, Gaslight, Adam’s Rib, and Born Yesterday. It would be difficult, then, to argue that Holliday helped Cukor as much as vice versa; Cukor, Hepburn, and Tracy practically conspired to break Holliday into feature films. But when a filmmaker does work as varied and numerous as Cukor, a star as specific and idiosyncratic as Holliday can provide a clear point of departure, if only for a few years at a time.

Born Yesterday, which would have been Cukor’s follow-up to Adam’s Rib if he didn’t slip a Lana Turner drama in the middle, represents a particular peak for both parties—one classic that wouldn’t be on Cukor’s CV without Holliday. She reprised a role she first played on stage, and won a Best Actress Oscar for it, while Cukor made perhaps his best-loved movie of the ’50s, one of his last classics before a final triumph over a decade later.

Holliday’s first line in Born Yesterday, repeated several times throughout the film, is a nasal, honking “WHAAAT,” shouted out of a window by Billie Dawn (Holliday) in response to her uncouth boyfriend Harry Brock (Broderick Crawford). Brock has come to Washington, D.C., to make some sleazy business deals with politicians, and quickly becomes worried that Billie will embarrass him in meetings. He hires Paul Verrall (William Holden), a local reporter, to “smooth the rough edges off,” not realizing the two will fall in love. To the movie’s credit, it doesn’t play coy with this development; it seems to happen almost immediately, which fits in with some of Cukor’s other romantic comedies, which often (though not always) follow characters who are essentially already in love with each other.

The attempted refinement of a brassy dame has been a durable plot for works of art from Pygmalion to The House Bunny; Cukor himself took another crack when he adapted the Pygmalion-based musical My Fair Lady for the screen in 1964, and won an Oscar for his trouble. Born Yesterday distinguishes itself both with Cukor’s direction and Holliday’s starmaking performance. Cukor’s aesthetic respects the film’s (and his) theatrical roots—a fair portion of it is long dialogue scenes taking place in a hotel room—while taking advantage of his cinematic confidence and skill with actors. Holliday, with her squawky New York voice, is very funny as Billie, but she plays notes of melancholy, too. The way she mumbles at the ends of sentences implies that she’s not accustomed to being taken seriously, or maybe even heard at all, creating the distinction between Billie being dumb and Billie having the curiosity and excitement wrung out of her by a lousy relationship. Her dizzy-dame shtick doesn’t register as shtick at all—it’s more grounded and less confident than traditional screwball.

Cukor gets on Holliday’s wavelength, slowing down the movie around the half-hour mark in a scene where Billie and Harry play gin, with long pauses for card-flipping and dealing until Harry finally reiterates his point about Billie needing more sophistication—and Billie waiting some more before offering her rebuttal. Until that rebuttal, the game plays out in a single take. Of course, movies in Cukor’s era(s) had far fewer cuts than contemporary cinema, but Cukor especially favors the capturing of dialogue—especially one-on-one arguments—in single shots. Adam’s Rib has a number of long conversations that play out in extended takes, although most of them involve Hepburn and Tracy, not Holliday. Holliday would get her own Cukor comedy-of-remarriage picture with The Marrying Kind, only it’s even heavier on the remarriage (Hepburn and Tracy’s relationship never truly seems in doubt) and vastly lighter on the comedy.

The Marrying Kind has even more marriage bona fides in that it was written by the husband-and-wife team of Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin. Kanin had some kind of a hand in all of the major Cukor/Holliday films, having written the screenplay to Adam’s Rib with Gordon and It Should Happen To You on his own, as well as the original stage version of Born Yesterday. The Marrying Kind follows a couple played by Holliday and Aldo Ray as they file for divorce with a judge, and recount the story of their marriage in a series of flashbacks. There’s a certain ironic oddity in the pairing: Holliday was still potentially early in her film career (though as it turned out, not as early as she should have been), and this was Ray’s first big starring role, in contrast with long-standing chemistry enjoyed by the stars of Adam’s Rib. They’re new stars playing regular people who have been through the wringer.

That less-practiced quality is appropriate for the young couple’s innocent beginnings. But Holliday works better as a figure of contrast, and Ray’s lummox-y charisma is sort of the dude version of her (albeit not shining as brightly); their only contrast is in size. As a duo, their mutual weariness takes over, and they seem ill-equipped to help each other, much less deal with the rest of the world. Holliday sounds more tired and marble-mouthed than in Born Yesterday, and rather than giving his newfound star a bubbly showcase, Cukor emphasizes her serious side. One of the film’s most memorable scenes chronicles an argument between Holliday and Ray over an epic three-minute take, with Cukor’s camera coming in and backing out as needed to keep them in the frame as they move.

It’s a knockout on its own, but part of a wearying whole. Cukor didn’t exclusively make comedies, but The Marrying Kind, especially considering its proximity and resemblance to Adam’s Rib, feels lacking in levity. The film is never more than lightly amusing, but takes a particularly grim turn (hinted at earlier) when the couple recounts the drowning death of their son. Cukor stages the scene effectively, with Holliday singing and playing a ukulele in the foreground as a mass of people gathers in a panic in the background, by the lake where their son has gone swimming. But there’s something bloodless and calculated about the melodrama; the child’s death becomes one more obstacle in the way of a happy marriage. It’s not the fault of the performers, especially not Holliday; her rawness briefly makes the anguish believable. But if Cukor takes expert advantage of stagy qualities in Adam’s Rib and Born Yesterday, he succumbs to kitchen-sink melodrama in The Marrying Kind. His ability to ground his comedies doesn’t feel reversible here, where some lightness might have given the movie—and Holliday—more to do.

At the risk of sounding lowbrow, It Should Happen To You is more what audiences might reasonably expect from a Cukor-directed Judy Holliday vehicle. Holliday plays Gladys Glover, a plucky if somewhat discouraged woman from Binghamton, living in Manhattan but recently fired from her job. She rents a billboard over Columbus Circle advertising herself—not as an employee, particularly, but simply her name—and becomes famous as the woman with the name on the sign. This fame complicates her sorta-relationship with filmmaker Pete Sheppard (Jack Lemmon, in his first big role; Holliday, barely out of her own up-and-comer stage, was apparently a magnet for other up-and-comers).

As in Born Yesterday, Holliday plays someone with a tentative grasp of her own worth; she takes childlike pleasure in looking at her name up on a big sign (and later, on several signs all around Manhattan). Most of that pleasure seems purely momentary; Gladys doesn’t seem to aspire to anything more than being known. As far as Cukor leading ladies, Holliday represents a break from the confidence of someone like Katharine Hepburn. Typical Hepburn characters banter and parry, going after what they want; Holliday characters tumble into comebacks, struggle, and trail off.

But Cukor doesn’t use these qualities as an excuse to make his movies daffier; even a relative trifle like It Should Happen To You has a certain moral gravity. Gladys doesn’t exactly say that she wants to be famous for being famous, but that’s exactly what happens to her. It seems prescient today, albeit filtered through some quaint notions that are more of their time, particularly Pete’s extolling the virtues of not standing out from a crowd—and his claim that privacy is what people want most in the world. Though the movie is sympathetic to Gladys, it clearly shares Pete’s concerns (which, to a modern audience, may come off as condescending concern-trolling) and views her story as a cautionary one.

Though Gladys Glover may not represent a mortal threat to our American way of life (no matter how much Lemmon kvetches about her misguided desire), Cukor’s films with Holliday do allow her a surprising sense of rawness and even danger. That’s especially true of her gun-toting first scene in Adam’s Rib, but there’s a more subtle danger even in It Should Happen To You, where her character’s very wants (to see her name on giant signs, irrespective of any particular accomplishment) feel out of whack compared to other rom-com or even screwball heroines. A lot of screwball characters want something understandable and go after it in wacky or unpredictable ways. Holliday isn’t opaque enough to be described as unknowable, but there’s a lack of calculation in her characters that brings them to their unpredictability in ways that feel both natural and, sometimes, a little unnerving.

There’s also something poignant about much of Holliday’s career appearing as a five-year phase toward the end of Cukor’s (he would continue working sporadically through 1981, but only made a half-dozen films, two for television, after winning his Oscar for My Fair Lady). In some ways, his films with Holliday are a Cukor career in miniature: a theatrical adaptation, a drama about marriage, a couple of romantic comedies including a Tracy/Hepburn pairing. Holliday, with her very specific voice and presence, doesn’t necessarily seem like the ideal actor to partner with when creating (intentionally or not) a late-career retrospective of various types of material. But she adapts, by seeming not to adapt at all. “Was that an accident or did you do it on purpose?” a suitor asks Gladys Glover at one point in It Should Happen To You. She responds: “To tell you the truth, I don’t know.” A lot of actors could say that line. But Cukor and Holliday make it sound like the truth.

Next time: An incredibly busy actor buckles down with a self-impressed genius.

Источник: https://www.avclub.com/george-cukor-remade-his-career-in-miniature-with-judy-h-1798245359

Judy Holliday

Judy Holliday was an American actress. Born Judith Tuvim in New York City, she began her career on the stage. Her first movie was Greenwich Village in 1944. She had a few more minor roles, before moving back to New York and the stage.

Her big break came in 1949, with a role in Adam's Rib. The part gave her the chance to star in Born Yesterday the next year, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Holliday was called to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee to explain her Communist links, but the appearance did not blackball her career, unlike the cases of others in the movie business.

In 1956 she starred in The Solid Gold Cadillac and in 1960 in Bells Are Ringing, in the role she had originated on Broadway.

In 1965 she died from breast cancer.

She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6901 Hollywood Blvd.


Note: This profile was written in or before 2004.

Judy Holliday Facts

Selected Filmography

Kindergarten Cop
Bells are Ringing
On the Town
Adam's Rib
Silver Screen Romances
Born Yesterday
That's Dancing!
Jack Lemmon Showcase Volume 1
Источник: https://www.filmbug.com/db/141907

Judy Holliday 1921 - 1965



ACTRESS


Romance

Musical

Drama

Short

Documentary

12 movies

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