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(I'm one of them.) Says the salesperson to their bosses: "You changed retail's entire landscape. Stop placing blame and understand we all want. Given that spectrum is one of the barriers to entry for anyone planning a wireless network, and that getting the stuff approved for a mobile broadband network. Verizon's fixed wireless access (FWA) rollout on LTE for rural areas is doing so “The cable companies and home internet providers were in one space.
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Latest Verizon Message Plus Sender for Windows - Working Login Method
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How to Claim Your Free Year of Discovery+ Through Verizon

Image for article titled How to Claim Your Free Year of Discovery+ Through Verizon

Verizon customers can snag up to 12 months of the brand new Discovery+ streaming service for free. Here’s how to get it.

The new streaming service—home to content from HGTV, the History Channel, TLC, Discovery Channel, Food Netflix, A&E, and BBC’s natural history programming like Planet Earth and Blue Planet—officially launches today with more than 50 originals and tens of thousands of episodes of on-demand content from across the Discovery portfolio. Normally, the service will cost $5 per month for its ad-supported tier or $7 per month to go ad-free. But Verizon customers can claim up to a year of the service for free with select Unlimited plans or with a new Fios or 5G home internet plan.

First, head to the Discovery+ landing page on Verizon’s website. Scroll down to the bottom of the page, where you’ll see a section titled, “Four easy ways to discover more.” If you already have an unlimited plan, select therightmost option. (If you plan to upgrade, or if you’re subscribing through an internet plan, you’ll also be able to claim your offer from this menu.) When signed into your account, selecting this option should take you to your add-ons menu, where you’ll see various promotional offers and packages for services like Disney+ and Apple Music. Scroll down until you see Discovery+, and then click the Get it now button.

You’ll need to accept the terms and conditions on the following page before the service is added to your account. Again, the promotion covers the ad-free version of the service (a bonus!), but that means you’ll be on the hook for $7 per month after your trial window expires. If you don’t want to continue paying for it after your trial ends, I recommend setting a reminder to cancel your subscription.

Even if you aren’t a Verizon customer, you’ll still be able to snag a free trial. Discovery+ offers a week of its service for free, after which time you’ll be charged according to your selection at sign-up (either $5 with ads, or $7 without). And I’d absolutely recommend taking advantage of this offer if for no other reason than exclusive access to A Perfect Planet, the new David Attenborough project.

The service is available beginning today on Fire TV devices (with a Prime Video channel on the way), Roku, Samsung smart TVs, Xbox One and next-generation devices, Android devices, Apple devices, and Chromecast with Google TV. Keep an eye out for our full review of the service in the days to come.

TechStreaming Services

Источник: https://gizmodo.com/how-to-claim-your-free-year-of-discovery-through-veriz-1845984215

Verizon Recalls 2.5 Million Ellipsis Jetpack Mobile Hotspots Imported by Franklin Wireless Due to Fire and Burn Hazards

Consumers can reduce the risk of hazard by powering the unit off, unplugging it from its power source and store in a place away from children, on top a hard surface with adequate ventilation around the unit and away from combustibles  until it can be properly returned to Verizon. 

If consumers must use the product for internet access, then they should take the following steps:

  • Turn the recalled hotspot “on” and plug it in to allow the hotspot to receive two over-the-air automatic software updates that: 
    • (a) enable the device’s identifying number to be viewed on its scrolling screen and 
    • (b) prevent the device from charging while the device is plugged in and powered on. 
  • After the software update is applied, users should:
    • (a) Leave the device powered on while it is plugged in. 
    • (b) When not in use, the device should be turned off, unplugged from its power source, and securely stored. 
  • Consumers should use the contact information below to receive a replacement hotspot free of charge and a return envelope to return the Ellipsis to Verizon for safe disposal.
  • Schools that provided the recalled Ellipsis Jetpack to students have been contacted by Verizon with instructions on receiving replacement hotspots free of charge and mailing packages to return the recalled Ellipsis Jetpacks to Verizon for safe disposal. 
  • Parents whose children received the recalled Ellipsis Jetpack from their schools should contact their school for instructions on how to receive a free replacement device and return their recalled Ellipsis Jetpacks.
Источник: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2021/Verizon-Recalls-2-5-Million-Ellipsis-Jetpack-Mobile-Hotspots-Imported-by-Franklin-Wireless-Due-to-Fire-and-Burn-Hazards

Your mobile phone account could be hijacked by an identity thief

A few weeks ago an unknown person walked into a mobile phone store, claimed to be me, asked to upgrade my mobile phones, and walked out with two brand new iPhones assigned to my telephone numbers. My phones immediately stopped receiving calls, and I was left with a large bill and the anxiety and fear of financial injury that spring from identity theft. This post describes my experiences as a victim of ID theft, explains the growing problem of phone account hijacking, and suggests ways consumers and mobile phone carriers can help combat these scams.

My Experiences as a Victim of ID Theft

One evening my mobile phone stopped working mid call. After discovering that another phone on my account also had no signal, I called my mobile carrier on a landline phone. The customer service representative explained that my account had been updated to include new iPhones, and in the process the SIM cards in my Android phones had been deactivated. She assumed it was a mistake, and told me to take my phones to one of my mobile carrier’s retail stores.

The store replaced my SIM cards and got my phones working again. A store employee explained that a thief claiming to be me had gone into a phone store and “upgraded” my two phones to the most expensive iPhone models available and transferred my phone numbers to the new iPhones.

I called my mobile carrier’s fraud department and reported what happened. The representative agreed to remove the charges, but blamed the theft on me. When I asked how the store authenticated the thief, he told me that employees of stores owned by the mobile carrier would have asked for the account holder’s photo ID and the last four digits of their social security number, but if the theft occurred at another retailer, that might not have happened.

I logged in to my online account, changed the password, and added an extra security PIN recommended by the fraud department. I then logged on to the Federal Trade Commission’s identitytheft.gov website to report the theft and learn how to protect myself. Identitytheft.gov is a one-stop resource for identity theft victims. It includes step-by-step instructions and sample letters to guide victims through the recovery process. Following the Identitytheft.gov checklist, I placed a fraud alert and obtained a free credit report. I also prepared an identity theft complaint affidavit, which I later printed and took with me to my local police station when I filed a police report.

I called my mobile carrier back several times over the next few days to finish cleaning up this mess. One of my phones had ended up with the wrong phone number and the other one no longer had voice mail. A few days later I received an email about mobile phone insurance that the thief had apparently added to my account. After three trips to my carrier’s retail stores and many hours on the phone, my carrier eventually fixed all the problems and refunded the fraudulent charges.

I was interested in learning where the theft had occurred and how much of my personal information was in the hands of the thief. Section 609(e) of the Fair Credit Reporting Act requires that companies provide business records related to identity theft to victims within 30 days of receiving a written request. So, following the template provided by Identitytheft.gov, I wrote a letter to my carrier requesting all records related to the fraudulent upgrades on my account. After about two months my carrier sent me the records. I learned that the thief had used a fake ID with my name and her photo. She had acquired the iPhones at a retail store in Ohio, hundreds of miles from where I live, and charged them to my account on an installment plan. It appears she did not actually make use of either phone, suggesting her intention was to sell them for a quick profit. As far as I’m aware the thief has not been caught and could be targeting others with this crime.

The Growing Problem of Phone Account Hijacking

Records of identity thefts reported to the FTC provide some insight into how often thieves hijack a mobile phone account or open a new mobile phone account in a victim’s name. In January 2013, there were 1,038 incidents of these types of identity theft reported, representing 3.2% of all identity theft incidents reported to the FTC that month. By January 2016, that number had increased to 2,658 such incidents, representing 6.3% of all identity thefts reported to the FTC that month.  Such thefts involved all four of the major mobile carriers.

Identity theft reports to the FTC likely represent only the tip of a much larger iceberg. According to data from the Identity Theft Supplement to the 2014 National Crime Victimization Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice, less than 1% of identity theft victims reported the theft to the FTC.

Media reports on mobile phone account hijacking provide more evidence of this problem. A 2013 Forbes article reported that the government had seized over 5,500 phones from a Michigan operation that allegedly acquired them fraudulently from AT&T, Verizon, Best Buy, Radio Shack, and Apple stores and was shipping them overseas. The article reported that thieves used stolen identities to upgrade phones and add phone lines to existing accounts. In February 2015 more than 50 customers in the Denver area complained that Verizon had charged them for iPhone 6s, iPads, and new service plans they had not ordered. A North Carolina church received an AT&T bill for 17 iPhones purchased by an identity thief. In December 2015, four suspects were charged with using fake identity documents to purchase iPhones at AT&T stores in Kansas. In April 2016 three people arrested in a traffic stop in New Jersey were found to have fake IDs with the names of identity theft victims that they had used to fraudulently acquire iPhones. In May a man was arrested in Oregon for trying to buy four iPhones at a Verizon store using a fake ID. The man had previously been arrested twice on similar charges.

The Identitytheft.gov reports indicate that it is common for thieves to hijack a mobile phone account and also open other accounts in the victim’s name, days or weeks later. These are often mobile accounts with other carriers or credit cards for retail stores. In addition, some victims reported that identity thieves also changed the email addresses associated with their financial accounts.

Some victims did not have their mobile account hijacked, but instead received bills or calls from bill collectors about accounts with other carriers that identity thieves had opened with their names.

Most of the account hijackings likely occurred without the victims having provided information to fraudsters themselves. There are a number of reverse-lookup websites that will identify the carrier associated with any US phone number for free. Some will also identify the name of the subscriber and their city and state for free, and will sell the complete address for less than a dollar. There are also black market websites that sell dossiers that include social security numbers.

Other victims have also recounted falling for a phone scam in which the caller impersonated a representative from their mobile carrier. One victim reported that before their account was hijacked, a caller fraudulently claiming to be from their mobile carrier told them that their phone service would be down for 24 to 48 hours. Another victim reported that that a phony representative from their carrier’s fraud department called them and asked them to read back a code that had just been texted to their phone. When the victim complied, the fraudster was able to impersonate the victim and make unauthorized changes to their mobile account.

Perhaps most insidious, some thieves use their victim’s hijacked phone number to gain access to financial accounts that use two-factor authentication through text messages. This is known internationally as a “SIM swap” scam, or “SIM splitting.” The New York Division of Consumer Protection also warns about this scam on their website.

Thieves first purchase the victim’s bank account info or acquire it through a phishing attack. They may also look for publicly available information about the victim on social networks that can help them answer security questions. Then they impersonate the victim and call the victim’s mobile phone company to report that their phone has been damaged or stolen and convince the company to cancel the SIM card and activate a new SIM card with the victim’s phone number in the thieves’ phone. The thieves are then able to make bank account transfers, responding to phone calls and text messages directed to the victim’s phone number in order to complete the transactions. The victim’s phone stops working as soon as the SIM card is swapped. It usually takes them several hours or days to get their phone service restored, and longer to notice that their bank account has been emptied.

Industry experts I spoke with at a company that provides authentication services for mobile banking told me that SIM swap scams have become common in Europe and are increasing in the United States. In addition to obtaining information through phishing attacks, they told me that fraudsters often purchase victims’ information from black market sellers, or from rogue employees of financial institutions or mobile carriers. Unfortunately, there is little a consumer can do to prevent this.

What You Can Do

I asked all the major mobile carriers what consumers could do to protect themselves from a mobile account takeover. One of the most important steps you can take is to establish a password or PIN that is required before making changes to your mobile account. Each of the carriers offers this feature to their customers in a slightly different way.

AT&T offers a feature they refer to as “extra security.” Once activated, any interaction with AT&T, whether online, via phone, or in a retail store will require that you provide your passcode. You can use your AT&T online account or the myAT&T app on your mobile phone to turn on extra security. Note, that when you login online with your passcode, you may be presented with the option to not be asked for it again. Do not accept this option or you will disable extra security.

Sprint asks customers to set a PIN and security questions when they establish service with Sprint, so no additional steps are needed to use this feature.

T-Mobile allows their customers to establish a customer care password on their accounts. Once established, customers are required to provide this password when contacting T-Mobile by phone. To establish such a password, customers can call T-Mobile customer service or visit a T-Mobile retail store.

Verizon allows their customers to set an account PIN. Customers can do this by editing their profile in their online account, calling customer service, or visiting a Verizon retail store. This PIN provides additional security for telephone transactions and certain other transactions.

Using this extra password or PIN is a good idea and should help reduce your risk of mobile account takeovers. However, it does not offer complete protection, so make sure you remain alert for phishing attacks, protect your financial account information, and examine your mobile phone and credit card bills carefully every month for signs of fraud. If your phone stops receiving a signal and says “emergency calls only” or “no network,” even after you restart your phone, contact your mobile carrier to see whether your account has been hijacked.

What Mobile Carriers Should Do

The mobile carriers are in a better position than their customers to prevent identity theft through mobile account hijacking and fraudulent new accounts. In fact, many of them are obligated to comply with the Red Flags Rule, which, among other things, requires them to have a written identity theft prevention program.

Carriers should adopt a multi-level approach to authenticating both existing and new customers and require their own employees as well as third-party retailers to use it for all transactions.

Having a mobile phone account hijacked can waste hours of a victim’s time and cause them to miss important calls and messages. However, this crime is particularly problematic due to the growing use of text messages to mobile phones as part of authentication schemes for financial services and other accounts. The security of two-factor authentication schemes that use phones as one of the factors relies on the assumption that someone who steals your password has not also stolen your phone number. Thus, mobile carriers and third-party retailers need to be vigilant in their authentication practices to avoid putting their customers at risk of major financial loss and having email, social network, and other accounts compromised.

The author’s views are his or her own, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commission or any Commissioner.

Источник: https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/blogs/techftc/2016/06/your-mobile-phone-account-could-be-hijacked-identity-thief

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Источник: https://www.adp.com/logins/adp-resource.aspx

Verizon’s Visible cell customers hacked, leading to unauthorized purchases

Verizon’s Visible cell customers hacked, leading to unauthorized purchases
with 53 posters participating

Numerous Visible Wireless subscribers are reporting that their accounts were hacked this week. Visible runs on Verizon's 5G and 4G LTE networks and is owned by Verizon.

Suspicions of a data breach at Visible started Monday when some customers saw unauthorized purchases on their accounts:

On the Visible subreddit, users reported seeing unauthorized orders placed from their accounts:

Visible customer:

Social media was also full of reports of customers not receiving a response from Visible for days:

Credential stuffing likely, company says

In an email sent to customers and posted publicly yesterday, Visible shared what it believes caused the hacks.

"We have learned of an incident wherein information on some member accounts was changed without their authorization. We are taking protective steps to secure all impacted accounts and prevent any further unauthorized access," said Visible in the announcement. "Our investigation indicates that threat actors were able to access username/passwords from outside sources and exploit that information to log in to Visible accounts. If you use your Visible username and password across multiple accounts, including your bank or other financial accounts, we recommend updating your username/password with those services."

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The company's wording suggests that customer credentials were obtained from a third-party leak or breached database and then used to access customer accounts, a practice known as credential stuffing. The company advises customers to reset passwords and security information and will prompt users to re-validate payment information before further purchases can be made.

But an expert has cast doubts on the credential-stuffing theory, noting that Visible admitted in a tweet to "technical issues" with its chat platform this week, with the company briefly unable to make any changes to customer accounts. Visible has since deleted its tweet.

Did Visible know since last week?

Although Visible made a public statement yesterday, the company first acknowledged the issue on Twitter on October 8. At the time, Visible provided a vague reason: order confirmation emails erroneously sent out by the company.

"We're sorry for any confusion this may have caused! There was an error where this email was sent to members, please disregard it," the company told a customer.

Visible initially responded to concerns on October 8.

One Visible customer reacted angrily to the delay, saying, "This response is completely irresponsible, given the fact that you are currently under attack and are aware of MANY users that have had their accounts compromised."

Visible says customers won't be held liable for any unauthorized charges. "If there is a mistaken charge on your account, you will not be held accountable, and the charges will be reversed," the company said.

Visible customers impacted by the incident should monitor for suspicious transactions and change their passwords, both on their Visible account and any other websites where they have used the same credentials.

Источник: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2021/10/verizons-visible-wireless-investigating-hacked-customer-accounts/
one source login verizon

One source login verizon -

Project Pegasus

  1. Speed01
  2. Sustainability02
  3. Safety & Comfort03
  4. System Operations04
/04

Speed

We're building for fast, effortless journeys that expand possibilities. Our system can propel passenger or cargo pods at speeds of over 1000 km/h. That is 3x faster than high-speed rail and more than 10x faster than traditional rail.

graphical element

Motor

A modular array of 4 propulsion engines flank each side of our vehicle and support cruise velocities near 1,000 km/h in under 5 minutes. Our proprietary motor has a 50% better power factor, is 50% more compact, and can reach speeds 2-3 times faster than competing systems.

Vacuum

We've created a near-vacuum environment, reducing the air pressure down to the equivalent of 200,000 ft above sea level. The near vacuum lowers aerodynamic drag significantly, allowing for higher speeds to be achieved while using minimal energy.

Magnetic Levitation

Our vehicle levitates from the top using an attractive electromagnetic force, powered by onboard batteries. This levitation system is over 8 times more efficient compared to the world’s fastest maglev train in operation today and enables high-speed switching with no moving track.

Guidance

Magnets on the vehicle lift the vehicle to the passive track, while guidance engines provide active guidance forces.

Virgin Hyperloop

Sustainability

Sustainability is not a nice thing to have; it’s a requirement for transportation that moves us forward. Over its lifetime, the Virgin Hyperloop will have a lower environmental impact than other modes of mass transportation.

graphical element

Solar Panels

Our system is 100% electric and can draw power from any available energy source along the route. This gives us the potential to power the system by solar panels that cover the tube.

Construction Benefits

Depending on terrain, urban development, and environment, the Virgin Hyperloop works both above and below ground and is less expensive to build compared to high-speed rail.

Noise Level

It’s similar to electric vehicles that are so quiet they need to create noise to indicate movement. With hyperloop, we eliminate sources of mechanical noise, like wheels on a track, and we actually have a sound barrier inherent in our tube design.

Safety & Comfort

The Virgin Hyperloop delivers airline speeds, the same G-forces as rail, and the ease of riding a metro. A central command & control ensures safe and reliable passage throughout the network.

graphical element

Smooth Acceleration

As the pod accelerates to 1000 km/h in a near-vacuum environment, you won't spill a drop of your coffee.

Closed Environment

Hyperstructures can be built above or below ground, avoiding dangerous at-grade crossings. Our closed system architecture offers zero weather delays and eliminates interference.

Fully Autonomous

Near and far-field communications coordinate pod movement within the fully autonomous system. Sensors gather and transmit real-time positioning and location data, with up-to-the microsecond adjustments.

1/2 Tunnel Cost

By virtually eliminating aerodynamic drag, the Virgin Hyperloop can have a cross-sectional area ~1/2 that of high-speed rail and therefore close to half the cost.

Источник: https://virginhyperloop.com/

How to Claim Your Free Year of Discovery+ Through Verizon

Image for article titled How to Claim Your Free Year of Discovery+ Through Verizon

Verizon customers can snag up to 12 months of the brand new Discovery+ streaming service for free. Here’s how to get it.

The new streaming service—home to content from HGTV, the History Channel, TLC, Discovery Channel, Food Netflix, A&E, and BBC’s natural history programming like Planet Earth and Blue Planet—officially launches today with more than 50 originals and tens of thousands of episodes of on-demand content from across the Discovery portfolio. Normally, the service will cost $5 per month for its ad-supported tier or $7 per month to go ad-free. But Verizon customers can claim up to a year of the service for free with select Unlimited plans or with a new Fios or 5G home internet plan.

First, head to the Discovery+ landing page on Verizon’s website. Scroll down to the bottom of the page, where you’ll see a section titled, “Four easy ways to discover more.” If you already have an unlimited plan, select therightmost option. (If you plan to upgrade, or if you’re subscribing through an internet plan, you’ll also be able to claim your offer from this menu.) When signed into your account, selecting this option should take you to your add-ons menu, where you’ll see various promotional offers and packages for services like Disney+ and Apple Music. Scroll down until you see Discovery+, and then click the Get it now button.

You’ll need to accept the terms and conditions on the following page before the service is added to your account. Again, the promotion covers the ad-free version of the service (a bonus!), but that means you’ll be on the hook for $7 per month after your trial window expires. If you don’t want to continue paying for it after your trial ends, I recommend setting a reminder to cancel your subscription.

Even if you aren’t a Verizon customer, you’ll still be able to snag a free trial. Discovery+ offers a week of its service for free, after which time you’ll be charged according to your selection at sign-up (either $5 with ads, or $7 without). And I’d absolutely recommend taking advantage of this offer if for no other reason than exclusive access to A Perfect Planet, the new David Attenborough project.

The service is available beginning today on Fire TV devices (with a Prime Video channel on the way), Roku, Samsung smart TVs, Xbox One and next-generation devices, Android devices, Apple devices, and Chromecast with Google TV. Keep an eye out for our full review of the service in the days to come.

TechStreaming Services

Источник: https://gizmodo.com/how-to-claim-your-free-year-of-discovery-through-veriz-1845984215
Vulnerable Vendor Checklist">

Vulnerable Vendor Checklist

Our checklist helps you identify possible red flags so you can take steps to protect your network from cyberattacks and other threats to your data that stem from vendors’ access.

 

How compromised passwords lead to data breaches

According to the Verizon 2021 Data Breach Investigations Report, credentials are the primary means by which a bad actor hacks into an organization, with 61 percent of breaches attributed to leveraged credentials. Passwords, especially passwords with privileged access to organizational systems and networks, are targets for hackers since they’re able to get so much information from just one singular source. To put it simply,privileged credentials open a lot of doors.When the keys to those doors are mismanaged, a hacker has the potential to access a wealth of information and use it for malicious purposes, like leveraging confidential information for ransom payouts. 

And, unfortunately, many organizations inadvertently mismanage these targeted credentials by distributing the same access and privilege across the board to admins, employees, and third-party vendor reps.

 

How secure third-party remote access can prevent compromised credentials and data breaches

There’s a common misconception that third-party vendor access can be treated the same as employee access.When this myth is played out in the mismanagement of credentials, it can result in adverse consequences, especially considering that credentials permit access to all corners of a network. Neglecting the process of secure access management creates particular vulnerabilities in the case of third-party vendors and their access rights. 

When managing third-party remote access, the only way to ensure a vendor doesn’t compromise your network credentials is to never give them out. Remote support solutions should mask your network credentials and inject them for the vendor so they never have to see login information. This feature also helps prevent “leapfrogging”, or the process of a technician launching additional connections from within the initial target host. If the technician is never aware of the password, they are prevented from trying to log into other systems with the same account.

Phishing and malware

One common way for hackers to compromise credentials is to use phishing. According to the same Verizon report, phishing activity was present in over one-third of data breaches. And due to that success, attackers seem to focus on more refined, targeted attacks (i.e. spearphishing) versus the mass broadcast general attacks.

Attackers are more likely than ever to establish a foothold on your network via phishing methods. Organizations can defend against this attack method by strengthening their endpoint defenses to knock down the malware when it tries to infect and also by securing higher privilege credentials with technology.

Sharing and reusing passwords leads to data breaches

Sharing passwords among colleagues, both on purpose and on accident, can inadvertently lead to your credentials being compromised. Sure, you might trust your coworker to access important accounts, but that doesn’t mean the password is safe.

The deeper issue of password habits is that far too many users continue to use outdated practices that place their security at risk (e.g. writing down a password on a sticky note or using easily guessed passwords). Keep in mind many people do not assume responsibility for having a weak, or crackable password. One of the most alarming aspects is that many people aren’t even aware of how risky their password behaviors are. If they are aware, they accept the risks and simply take the easier, less secure route.

It doesn’t have to stay this way. There are proactive measures individuals and organizations can take to protect against shared passwords. Here are some password best practices for you to implement if you haven’t already:

  • Require strong passwords.
  • Implement two-factor or multi-factor authentication.
  • If breached, all passwords must be reset. Merely suggesting this as a plan of action leads many consumers to ignore the suggestion. It must be required as a protocol. 
  • Never have the same password for all accounts/logins. That way if one of your passwords is stolen or misused, the bad actor only has access to one platform instead of all. 
  • Practice what you preach. All password best practices should be used by internal and external employees.

 

How to prevent and mitigate data breaches due to compromised passwords

Privileged credentials open a lot of doors that shouldn’t be open to most people, especially external entities like third-party vendors. If these credentials are mismanaged, stolen, or abused, there could be dangerous consequences for the organization and the third party involved. 

If you want to reduce the risks associated with privileged credentials, start by taking back the keys to your network. Third parties can’t compromise passwords they don’t have. Ensure that both internal and external people who have access to your network are abiding by the password rules you have set, usually in adherence to different compliance standards or internal rules (i.e. resetting your password every 90 days, you can’t repeat the same password, and your password needs to include characters other than letters).

To learn more about how to protect yourself from data breaches tied to compromised credentials, even when granting third parties access to your network, download our vendor privileged access checklist that highlights exactly how you can ensure your vendors aren’t compromising your security.

Источник: https://www.securelink.com/blog/81-hacking-related-breaches-leverage-compromised-credentials/

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Источник: https://www.adp.com/logins/adp-resource.aspx

Your mobile phone account could be hijacked by an identity thief

A few weeks ago an unknown person walked into a mobile phone store, claimed to be me, asked to upgrade my mobile phones, and walked out with two brand new iPhones assigned to my telephone numbers. My phones immediately stopped receiving calls, and I was left with a large bill and the anxiety and fear of financial injury that spring from identity theft. This post describes my experiences as a victim of ID theft, explains the growing problem of phone account hijacking, and suggests ways consumers and mobile phone carriers can help combat these scams.

My Experiences as a Victim of ID Theft

One evening my mobile phone stopped working mid call. After discovering that another phone on my account also had no signal, I called my mobile carrier on a landline phone. The customer service representative explained that my account had been updated to include new iPhones, and in the process the SIM cards in my Android phones had been deactivated. She assumed it was a mistake, and told me to take my phones to one of my mobile carrier’s retail stores.

The store replaced my SIM cards and got my phones working again. A store employee explained that a thief claiming to be me had gone into a phone store and “upgraded” my two phones to the most expensive iPhone models available and transferred my phone numbers to the new iPhones.

I called my mobile carrier’s fraud department and reported what happened. The representative agreed to remove the charges, but blamed the theft on me. When I asked how the store authenticated the thief, he told me that employees of stores owned by the mobile carrier would have asked for the account holder’s photo ID and the last four digits of their social security number, but if the theft occurred at another retailer, that might not have happened.

I logged in to my online account, changed the password, and added an extra security PIN recommended by the fraud department. I then logged on to the Federal Trade Commission’s identitytheft.gov website to report the theft and learn how to protect myself. Identitytheft.gov is a one-stop resource for identity theft victims. It includes step-by-step instructions and sample letters to guide victims through the recovery process. Following the Identitytheft.gov checklist, I placed a fraud alert and obtained a free credit report. I also prepared an identity theft complaint affidavit, which I later printed and took with me to my local police station when I filed a police report.

I called my mobile carrier back several times over the next few days to finish cleaning up this mess. One of my phones had ended up with the wrong phone number and the other one no longer had voice mail. A few days later I received an email about mobile phone insurance that the thief had apparently added to my account. After three trips to my carrier’s retail stores and many hours on the phone, my carrier eventually fixed all the problems and refunded the fraudulent charges.

I was interested in learning where the theft had occurred and how much of my personal information was in the hands of the thief. Section 609(e) of the Fair Credit Reporting Act requires that companies provide business records related to identity theft to victims within 30 days of receiving a written request. So, following the template provided by Identitytheft.gov, I wrote a letter to my carrier requesting all records related to the fraudulent upgrades on my account. After about two months my carrier sent me the records. I learned that the thief had used a fake ID with my name and her photo. She had acquired the iPhones at a retail store in Ohio, hundreds of miles from where I live, and charged them to my account on an installment plan. It appears she did not actually make use of either phone, suggesting her intention was to sell them for a quick profit. As far as I’m aware the thief has not been caught and could be targeting others with this crime.

The Growing Problem of Phone Account Hijacking

Records of identity thefts reported to the FTC provide some insight into how often thieves hijack a mobile phone account or open a new mobile phone account in a victim’s name. In January 2013, there were 1,038 incidents of these types of identity theft reported, representing 3.2% of all identity theft incidents reported to the FTC that month. By January 2016, that number had increased to 2,658 such incidents, representing 6.3% of all identity thefts reported to the FTC that month.  Such thefts involved all four of the major mobile carriers.

Identity theft reports to the FTC likely represent only the tip of a much larger iceberg. According to data from the Identity Theft Supplement to the 2014 National Crime Victimization Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice, less than 1% of identity theft victims reported the theft to the FTC.

Media reports on mobile phone account hijacking provide more evidence of this problem. A 2013 Forbes article reported that the government had seized over 5,500 phones from a Michigan operation that allegedly acquired them fraudulently from AT&T, Verizon, Best Buy, Radio Shack, and Apple stores and was shipping them overseas. The article reported that thieves used stolen identities to upgrade phones and add phone lines to existing accounts. In February 2015 more than 50 customers in the Denver area complained that Verizon had charged them for iPhone 6s, iPads, and new service plans they had not ordered. A North Carolina church received an AT&T bill for 17 iPhones purchased by an identity thief. In December 2015, four suspects were charged with using fake identity documents to purchase iPhones at AT&T stores in Kansas. In April 2016 three people arrested in a traffic stop in New Jersey were found to have fake IDs with the names of identity theft victims that they had used to fraudulently acquire iPhones. In May a man was arrested in Oregon for trying to buy four iPhones at a Verizon store using a fake ID. The man had previously been arrested twice on similar charges.

The Identitytheft.gov reports indicate that it is common for thieves to hijack a mobile phone account and also open other accounts in the victim’s name, days or weeks later. These are often mobile accounts with other carriers or credit cards for retail stores. In addition, some victims reported that identity thieves also changed the email addresses associated with their financial accounts.

Some victims did not have their mobile account hijacked, but instead received bills or calls from bill collectors about accounts with other carriers that identity thieves had opened with their names.

Most of the account hijackings likely occurred without the victims having provided information to fraudsters themselves. There are a number of reverse-lookup websites that will identify the carrier associated with any US phone number for free. Some will also identify the name of the subscriber and their city and state for free, and will sell the complete address for less than a dollar. There are also black market websites that sell dossiers that include social security numbers.

Other victims have also recounted falling for a phone scam in which the caller impersonated a representative from their mobile carrier. One victim reported that before their account was hijacked, a caller fraudulently claiming to be from their mobile carrier told them that their phone service would be down for 24 to 48 hours. Another victim reported that that a phony representative from their carrier’s fraud department called them and asked them to read back a code that had just been texted to their phone. When the victim complied, the fraudster was able to impersonate the victim and make unauthorized changes to their mobile account.

Perhaps most insidious, some thieves use their victim’s hijacked phone number to gain access to financial accounts that use two-factor authentication through text messages. This is known internationally as a “SIM swap” scam, or “SIM splitting.” The New York Division of Consumer Protection also warns about this scam on their website.

Thieves first purchase the victim’s bank account info or acquire it through a phishing attack. They may also look for publicly available information about the victim on social networks that can help them answer security questions. Then they impersonate the victim and call the victim’s mobile phone company to report that their phone has been damaged or stolen and convince the company to cancel the SIM card and activate a new SIM card with the victim’s phone number in the thieves’ phone. The thieves are then able to make bank account transfers, responding to phone calls and text messages directed to the victim’s phone number in order to complete the transactions. The victim’s phone stops working as soon as the SIM card is swapped. It usually takes them several hours or days to get their phone service restored, and longer to notice that their bank account has been emptied.

Industry experts I spoke with at a company that provides authentication services for mobile banking told me that SIM swap scams have become common in Europe and are increasing in the United States. In addition to obtaining information through phishing attacks, they told me that fraudsters often purchase victims’ information from black market sellers, or from rogue employees of financial institutions or mobile carriers. Unfortunately, there is little a consumer can do to prevent this.

What You Can Do

I asked all the major mobile carriers what consumers could do to protect themselves from a mobile account takeover. One of the most important steps you can take is to establish a password or PIN that is required before making changes to your mobile account. Each of the carriers offers this feature to their customers in a slightly different way.

AT&T offers a feature they refer to as “extra security.” Once activated, any interaction with AT&T, whether online, via phone, or in a retail store will require that you provide your passcode. You can use your AT&T online account or the myAT&T app on your mobile phone to turn on extra security. Note, that when you login online with your passcode, you may be presented with the option to not be asked for it again. Do not accept this option or you will disable extra security.

Sprint asks customers to set a PIN and security questions when they establish service with Sprint, so no additional steps are needed to use this feature.

T-Mobile allows their customers to establish a customer care password on their accounts. Once established, customers are required to provide this password when contacting T-Mobile by phone. To establish such a password, customers can call T-Mobile customer service or visit a T-Mobile retail store.

Verizon allows their customers to set an account PIN. Customers can do this by editing their profile in their online account, calling customer service, or visiting a Verizon retail store. This PIN provides additional security for telephone transactions and certain other transactions.

Using this extra password or PIN is a good idea and should help reduce your risk of mobile account takeovers. However, it does not offer complete protection, so make sure you remain alert for phishing attacks, protect your financial account information, and examine your mobile phone and credit card bills carefully every month for signs of fraud. If your phone stops receiving a signal and says “emergency calls only” or “no network,” even after you restart your phone, contact your mobile carrier to see whether your account has been hijacked.

What Mobile Carriers Should Do

The mobile carriers are in a better position than their customers to prevent identity theft through mobile account hijacking and fraudulent new accounts. In fact, many of them are obligated to comply with the Red Flags Rule, which, among other things, requires them to have a written identity theft prevention program.

Carriers should adopt a multi-level approach to authenticating both existing and new customers and require their own employees as well as third-party retailers to use it for all transactions.

Having a mobile phone account hijacked can waste hours of a victim’s time and cause them to miss important calls and messages. However, this crime is particularly problematic due to the growing use of text messages to mobile phones as part of authentication schemes for financial services and other accounts. The security of two-factor authentication schemes that use phones as one of the factors relies on the assumption that someone who steals your password has not also stolen your phone number. Thus, mobile carriers and third-party retailers need to be vigilant in their authentication practices to avoid putting their customers at risk of major financial loss and having email, social network, and other accounts compromised.

The author’s views are his or her own, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Commission or any Commissioner.

Источник: https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/blogs/techftc/2016/06/your-mobile-phone-account-could-be-hijacked-identity-thief

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