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chinese food pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Restaurants That Deliver & Takeout · Logo for Wai Wai Chinese Cuisine. Wai Wai Chinese Cuisine · Logo for Lin's Asian Fusion. Lin's Asian Fusion · Logo. Hunan Wok Chinese Takeout Pittsburgh; Hunan Wok Chinese Takeout, Far South/South Hills; Get Menu, Reviews, Contact, Location, Phone Number, Maps and more. Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh · 1. Everyday noodles · 217 reviewsClosed Now · 2. Chinatown Inn · 67 reviews · 3. Chengdu Gourmet · 41 reviews · 4. Sesame Inn.

Chinese food pittsburgh -


Welcome

Dear Customers, starting August 1st, we will stop serving sushi. Instead, we are expanding our Chinese menu to include more traditional and home-style dishes! We welcome you to check out our updated menu in August!

Located in the beautiful city of Pittsburgh, our restaurant has been dedicated to offering the most memorable dining experience for you.

We pick ingredients carefully and use only the freshest and nature ones to prepare every dish, and have been trying to cook them in a healthier way to provide the most nutritious food. Much attention has been attached to ensure you a cozy and inviting ambiance where you could enjoy not only the great meal but also the authentic atmosphere.

The owner and all staffs in China Wok will greet you with the warmest welcome, whether you are a habitual patron or come for the first time. We have made painstaking efforts to create the tidiest and cleanest dining place, and guarantee you with friendly and timely service. Every of your demand and feeling will be cared in our restaurant.

If you have any commend or suggestion, or want to get more specific information about us, feel free to contact us at 412-281-0885, or browse ours Website http://www.tianchinawok.com, we will be delight to hear from you any time!

Welcome to experience the best meals in our fairyland!

Источник: http://www.tianchinawok.com/


logo: in ChineseChina Palace
Offering the finest variety of gourmet Chinese and seafood creations in Pittsburgh

Thank you for joining us at China Palace. We are sure you will enjoy your dining experience with us. Our menu offers a wide variety of favorite dishes from the provinces of Peking and Szechuan. Our menu reflects the unique flavor and character of Mandarin, Hunan and Szechuan-style preparations.

Mandarin cooking is subtle and sophisticated, having been refined for centuries by the best chefs whose tasks were to create sumptuous dinners for the imperial banquets of Mandarins. Nurtured in the Peking region, wheat is a commonly used ingredient, with rice being replaced by steamed buns as an accompaniment.

Hunan & Szechuan cooking utilizes special spices to produce meals known for their hot and spicy accents. A generous amount of garlic, ginger, hot peppers and Szechuan peppercorns create these unique dishes. We can make them as hot, or not, as your request.

China Palace 's Sushi Bar features many traditional Japanese dishes as well as some of our own unique creations.

 

graphic: double dragone
Enjoy your visit with us, and we look forward to serving you.

Источник: http://www.chinapalacesewickleypa.com/

Welcome To Castle Place Chinese Restaurant

Chinese FoodChinese Food

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

Best food, Good Food

Order Online

Our Speciality

★★★★★★★★

People are saying

Everything has just been fantastic! I would recommend this restaurant to anyone.

Clock

Working Hours

  • Sunday

    4:00 PM - 9:00 PM

  • Monday

    11:00 AM - 9:30 PM

  • Tuesday

    11:00 AM - 9:30 PM

  • Wednesday

    11:00 AM - 9:30 PM

  • Thursday

    11:00 AM - 9:30 PM

  • Friday

    11:00 AM - 10:00 PM

  • Saturday

    11:00 AM - 10:00 PM

Источник: https://castleplacetogo.com/

Northeastern Kitchen brings traditional Chinese food to Pittsburgh

Northeastern Kitchen is easy to miss. The Chinese restaurant sits in a basement on Forbes Avenue in Squirrel Hill with its narrow storefront nestled between a bank and a consignment store. Inside, it’s a cozy and humble space, sparsely decorated aside from the red tapestries that adorn the walls and the waving plastic cat that greets you at the cash register.

But don’t let the decor fool you — the menu is anything but typical. Instead of the classic General Tso’s chicken and lo mein, Northeastern Kitchen stays true to the cuisine from the region where it gets its name. In this case, “northeastern” refers to Heilongjiang, China’s northernmost province. A world away from the cultural hubs of Beijing and Shanghai, Heilongjiang is one of China’s agricultural and industrial hubs.

However, what makes Heilongjiang culture differ more from China’s other regions is its proximity to Russia. It has long been a region where the two countries have conducted trade. Waves of Russian immigrants, attracted by the need for labor to build a railroad, settled in the area in the mid-20th century. The result of mixing the two cultures can be clearly seen — or rather tasted — in the ingredients used in its food.

Heilongjiang is brutally cold. Whereas most heavily populated Chinese regions are in the warmer southwest regions, winter temperatures in Heilongjiang can dip down well below -30 degrees Fahrenheit. Because of this, there is a limited number of crops that can grow in time during the short growing season, such as corn, potatoes and barley. Unsurprisingly, these foods provide the base of many dishes you will find on Northeastern Kitchen’s menu.

Senior finance major Yan Liu (岩柳) manages the restaurant while her parents manage the kitchen. Levko Karmazyn — a videographer for The Pitt News — and I got the opportunity to sit down with her to discuss her experience managing such a distinct restaurant in Pittsburgh.

Restaurant management has always been part of Liu’s life. Before her family moved to the United States, they owned and operated a restaurant in her hometown of Shenyang. Liu moved to Pittsburgh six years ago with her mother, following her father who had already been living in the country and working as a chef for 20 years.

For Liu, it was an easy transition.

“My father first told my mom about Pittsburgh, ‘It’s so lovely.’ He loves it. I like it here, it’s really like my hometown, really similar. My hometown was about steel, like Pittsburgh,” Liu said.

Liu manages the front of house in an even-keeled manner, which contributes to the welcoming environment that the dining room emanates. It is clear that the restaurant has a dedicated following. Even as the lunch rush started to pick up, Liu found time to stop at each table to converse with the diners.

For those who aren’t familiar with traditional Chinese cuisine, the menu at Northeastern Kitchen can feel overwhelming. Chicken gizzards, cutlassfish and sliced kidney are sure to raise some eyebrows. Yet for the less adventurous eater, like myself, there are plenty of delicious options to choose from.

For a first-timer, I recommend ordering the sauerkraut dumplings to start, with a pot of barley tea to wash it down. The flavors are a perfect balance of sharp and mild — definitely sour, but not overwhelmingly so.

With such specific foods, Liu often has difficulty describing the dishes to new diners, as the menu itself offers no descriptions. As she would with any other diner, she slid a menu over to me and pointed to the dried tofu with chili powder.

“I think you’ll like this, it’s very good,” Liu said.

And she was right. The food, served in large enough portions to share, is hearty and mild, often fried in a thick sauce, in contrast to other styles of Chinese food such as mouth-numbingly spicy Sichuan cuisine.

On the cold and windy day when we stopped by, it was easy to imagine how such food would be comforting during the winter months of northeastern China. Mama’s shredded vegetable salad — Ma Ma Liang Cai — was a light, tangy and crunchy contrast to the heavier dishes.

After our meal, Liu gave me and the videographer a tour of the kitchen. Traditional Chinese cooking tools lined the stovetops. The air was filled with steam from the rice cooker as well as the Chinese broccoli that was being sauteed. Though two chefs were busy at work, they were more than happy to show off their cooking prowess. I watched in awe as one chef effortlessly tossed the vegetables around, being snapped back into reality as a waitress brushed by me, hands full with a plate of two entire steamed fishes.

The other chef pointed at the fish and proudly proclaimed “Yu!,” the Chinese word for fish. As a high school student, I had spent time working in restaurant kitchens. There was a tangible sense of pride and satisfaction in Northeastern Kitchen that other restaurants seem to lack.

Certain dietary differences have proved difficult for trying to operate a business in America. In Squirrel Hill in particular, which has a heavy Jewish population, she’s found its harder to sell dishes containing pork.

“[In northeastern food] there’s a lot of pork, but people here, they don’t like it. We cook more beef instead,” she said.

She also cited stringent health regulations and differences in tipping culture as two additional issues she was unprepared to face when operating a restaurant in the United States.

With such a strong business, Liu is confident that the future could hold more restaurant openings. But for now, she is satisfied that she has been able to establish herself in the community and give Pittsburghers a chance to try an entirely new type of food that is close to her heart.

Источник: https://pittnews.com/article/146747/blogs/northeastern-kitchen-brings-traditional-chinese-food-to-pittsburgh/

Café 33, in Squirrel Hill, brings Taiwanese cuisine to Pittsburgh

Expect potstickers, scallion pancakes and soup dumplings, but also marinated turnips and jellyfish with celery

We’d be lying if we said we’d ever imagined dining in the laundromat behind the Shady Avenue Starbucks in Squirrel Hill. But now that it has become a Taiwanese restaurant, Café 33, we had just that opportunity.

It sure cleaned up nice. The building, a one-story postwar box, doesn’t have much inherent character to play up, but it’s set back from the sidewalk to create a pleasant forecourt permitting that holy grail of Pittsburgh dining, outdoor seating. Indoors, the ambience is stylish without straining at hipster clichés (no barn wood, no Edison bulbs). There’s some elbow room, and it’s not especially loud.

While the decor seemed non-specific in its cultural references, the menu offered an extensive selection of distinctively Taiwanese cuisine. We love this recent (and long-overdue) trend to move beyond generic Chinese-American stir-fries and acknowledge the exciting regional diversity of true Chinese cuisine.

Café 33’s commitment to this approach was evident from the first page of its menu, featuring the xiaochi of Taiwan’s renowned night markets. Of course, potstickers, scallion pancakes and soup dumplings were represented, but there was not an egg roll in sight. Instead, we found a dozen or more options to tempt or challenge the palate, from marinated turnips to jellyfish with celery.

Our table quickly filled with platters and bowls. Potstickers were bite-sized, clearly housemade and well balanced between lightly crisped wrapper and lightly spiced filling. “Mini” soup dumplings were in fact only slightly smaller than most we’ve tried. They contained probably a bit less soup than was ideal, but still delivered that marvelously rich, savory soup-dumpling experience as the pork broth burst into our mouths at first chew. The dipping sauce, with filaments of fresh ginger, provided countering notes of brightness and zing.

A scallion pancake rolled around a thick, tender slice of beef was fantastic. It had a hint of crisp on the outside, a fresh cucumber nestled alongside the beef within, and a sauce akin to mu shu sweetly tying all these flavors together.

Squid in sa cha flavored soup caught Angelique’s attention, and although our server struggled to explain sa cha (“salty and … yellow”), we tried it anyway. Good call: The broth was reminiscent of hot-and-sour soup — clear yet deep brown in color, with a texture far from thin and some of those same sour notes. There was virtually no spicy heat to overpower the good flavors of mildly chewy squid, crunchy batons of bamboo shoot and wilted-yet-crisp shreds of cabbage. It was served in a large bowl with small cups for sharing, and we kept refilling small portions between our other courses.

We ordered “Smelly Crispy Bean Curd” despite the name. Essentially, this was a fermented version of fried tofu served with a kimchi-like pickle and spicy sauce drizzled on top, rather than dousing the curd. Our daughter the tofu enthusiast found it too funky — the title was not a misnomer — but Angelique enjoyed the flavor, even as she thought it was a touch too dry.

Cucumbers with garlic were milder than variations we’ve had at Squirrel Hill’s Sichuan restaurants. Café 33 added some sweet red pepper to the mix, and the whole dish was bright and crispy and cool.

Pork with chives consisted of tiny crumbles of ground pork, stir-fried so as to create both charred and tender bits, mixed nearly equally with snippets of Chinese chive, which was treated as a vegetable rather than an herb. Spicy fermented-black-bean sauce wasn’t fiery hot, but added plenty of zest and dimension to this addictive dish, which was served with a modest portion of white rice alongside.

Pan-fried noodles were the closest thing we tried to a Chinese-American classic. The noodles themselves were ultra-thin, crisp-fried into a sturdy bird’s-nest, and served beneath stir-fried vegetables with chicken and baby shrimp in a light brown sauce. Even with such a familiar preparation, Café 33 stood out for a broad array of perfectly cooked vegetables, clearly not dumped from a freezer bag; for the extraordinary texture of the velveted shrimp (a technique somewhat akin to battering, but with a lighter coating); and for the restraint of the simple sauce.

It’s an amazing time to be a fan of Chinese food in Pittsburgh. Café 33 joins our list of places we are eager to revisit for another taste of dishes we loved at first bite, as well as for further exploration of the delicacies of, in this case, authentic Taiwanese cuisine.

Источник: http://twcafe33.com/

Wai Wai Chinese Cuisine

  • B1. Chicken with Broccoli, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B1. Beef with Broccoli, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B1. Shrimp with Broccoli, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B2. Sweet and Sour Chicken, Honey Chicken$10.95
  • B3. Chicken on a Stick, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B4. Pepper Steak with Onion, Sweet and Sour Chicken$10.95
  • B6. Chicken with Mixed Vegetables, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B6. Beef with Mixed Vegetables, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B6. Shrimp with Mixed Vegetables, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B7. Shrimp with Garlic Sauce, Sesame Chicken$10.95
  • B7. Chicken with Garlic Sauce, Sesame Chicken$10.95
  • B8. Kung Pao Chicken, Honey Chicken$10.95
  • B8. Kung Pao Shrimp, Honey Chicken$10.95
  • B9. Szechuan Chicken, General Tso's Chicken$10.95
  • B11. Mixed Vegetables, Stir Fried Mushroom$10.95
  • Choice of pork, chicken, vegetable, beef, shrimp, or combo.

    1. Pork$7.95
    2. Chicken$7.95
    3. Vegetable$7.95
    4. Beef$8.95
    5. Shrimp$8.95
    6. Combo$8.95
  • RN1. Young Chow Fried Rice$8.95
  • All white meat. Choice of plain, chicken, vegetable, beef, shrimp, or combo.

    1. Pork$7.95
    2. Chicken$7.95
    3. Vegetable$7.95
    4. Beef$8.95
    5. Shrimp$8.95
    6. Combo$8.95
  • RN4. Singapore Mai Fun$10.50

    Pork, shrimp, chicken and thin rice noodles stir fried in a spicy curry sauce.

  • RN5. Cantonese Chow Mein$11.50

    Pan-fried egg noodles stir fried with shrimp, chicken, beef and mixed vegetables.

  • Fresh wide rice noodles cooked in a cantonese style with green onions and white onions.

  • A combination of chicken, beef, scallop, shrimp, and roast pork with mixed vegetables in a chef's special brown sauce.

  • WS2. Seafood Delight$14.95

    Sauteed jumbo shrimp, scallops, crab meat, and lobster stir-fried with mixed vegetables in a white wine sauce.

  • WS3. Triple Delight$13.50

    Sauteed sliced chicken, large shrimp, and tender beef with mixed vegetables in a special brown sauce.

  • Sauteed jumbo shrimp, beef, chicken, roast pork, and mixed vegetables in special brown sauce.

  • WS5. Dragon & Phoenix$12.50

    Two dishes in one. Tangy shrimp and General Tso's chicken.

  • WS6. General Tso's Chicken$12.50

    Breaded chicken, deep fried, and cooked in special sesame sauce.

  • WS7. Sesame Chicken$12.50

    Marinated, boneless chicken, quickly fried until crisp, then sauteed with special sesame sauce.

  • WS8. Moo Goo Gai Pan$11.75

    Sliced chicken with Chinese vegetables and mushrooms in a home-style white sauce. All white meat.

  • WS9. Sweet & Sour Chicken$12.50

    Pineapple, bell peppers, and onions in sweet sour sauce.

  • WS10. Walnut Chicken$12.95

    Lightly breaded chicken breast served with broccoli and walnut in a home style sauce. All white meat.

  • WS10. Walnut Shrimp$12.95

    Shrimp served with broccoli and walnut in a home style sauce.

  • WS11. Honey Chicken$12.50

    Lightly breaded chicken served in a sweet honey brown sauce.

  • WS12. Pepper Steak with Onion$11.95

    Sliced steak with pepper and onion in a brown sauce.

  • WS13. Mongolian Beef$11.95

    Stir-fried steak with scallion and onion.

  • WS14. Orange Flavored Beef$12.95

    Tossed with chili pepper and fresh orange peel for a spicy, citrus flavor combination.

  • WS15. Shrimp with Lobster Sauce$11.95

    Jumbo shrimp, beans, carrots, and scallions in a garlic white wine sauce.

  • WS16. Sesame Shrimp$12.95

    Lightly breaded jumbo shrimp with broccoli in a sweet brown sauce and covered with sesame seeds.

  • WS17. Shrimp and Scallops$12.95

    Stir-fried with vegetable in a garlic sauce.

  • WS18. Coconut Shrimp$12.95

    Lightly breaded jumbo shrimp served with lettuce in a light coconut sauce.

  • WS19. Black Pepper Chicken$10.95

    Diced chicken stir fried with onions and peppers in a light black pepper sauce.

  • WS20. Orange Flavored Chicken$12.50

    Tossed with chili pepper and fresh orange peel for a spicy, citrus flavor combination.

  • WS21. Hot and Spicy Shrimp$12.25
  • WS22. General Tso's Shrimp$12.95

    Shrimp, deep fried, and cooked in special sesame sauce.

  • Sauteed with mixed vegetables in a spicy brown sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Diced carrots, celery, baby corn, water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, and peanuts in a brown sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Sauteed with mixed vegetables in a spicy garlic sauce.?Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Celery, carrot, bamboo shoots, onion, and zucchini in a tasty black bean sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Sauteed with mixed vegetables in a spicy sauce.?Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Diced carrots, celery, baby corn, bamboo shoots, mushroom, and cashew nuts in a brown sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Stir-fried with carrots and bamboo shoots in a delicious chef's special brown sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Onion, pepper, carrot, and bamboo shoots in a spicy curry sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Fresh vegetables in brown sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • Onion, celery, carrots, mushroom, and bamboo shoots in a Sha Cha sauce. Choice of tofu, beef, chicken, shrimp, or mixed.

    1. Tofu$10.50
    2. Chicken$11.25
    3. Beef$11.95
    4. Shrimp$12.25
    5. Mixed$12.25
  • 1. General Tso's Chicken$7.95
  • 4. Hot & Spicy Shrimp$7.95
  • 5. Sweet & Sour Chicken$7.95
  • 6. Chicken on the Stick (3)$7.95
  • 7. Pepper Steak with Onion$7.95
  • Choice of shrimp, beef, chicken, or tofu.

  • Choice of shrimp, beef, chicken, or tofu.

  • Choice of shrimp, beef, chicken, or tofu.

  • 13. Black Bean Sauce$7.95

    Choice of shrimp, beef, chicken, or tofu.

  • 14. Mixed Vegetables$7.95

    Choice of shrimp, beef, chicken, or tofu.

  • Choice of shrimp, beef, chicken, or tofu.

  • B1. Chicken with Broccoli, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B1. Beef with Broccoli, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B1. Shrimp with Broccoli, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B3. Chicken on a Stick, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B6. Chicken with Mixed Vegetables, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B6. Beef with Mixed Vegetables, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B6. Shrimp with Mixed Vegetables, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B7. Shrimp with Garlic Sauce, Sesame Chicken, Chicken with Fried Rice$8.95
  • B7. Chicken with Garlic Sauce, Sesame Chicken, Chicken with Fried Rice$8.95
  • B8. Kung Pao Chicken, Honey Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B8. Kung Pao Shrimp, Honey Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B9. Szechuan Chicken, General Tso's Chicken, Chicken Fried Rice$8.95
  • B11. Mixed Vegetables, Stir Fried Mushroom, Vegetable Fried Rice$8.95

    Comes with vegetable fried rice.

  • B12. Home Style Tofu, Stir Fried Mushroom, Vegetable Fried Rice$8.95

    Comes with vegetable fried rice.

More Asian Food Options on EatStreet.com
Wai Wai Chinese Cuisine4717 Liberty Ave Pittsburgh PA, 15224(412) 621-0133
Monday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Tuesday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Wednesday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Thursday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Friday11:00 am - 11:00 pm
Saturday11:00 am - 11:00 pm
Sunday12:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Monday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Tuesday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Wednesday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Thursday11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Friday11:00 am - 11:00 pm
Saturday11:00 am - 11:00 pm
Sunday12:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Источник: https://waiwaichinese.com

Chinese Food Is 'Communication,’ Connecting Cultures In Pittsburgh

Chopsticks clink against bowls over hushed conversations in Chinese, as the unmistakable smells of stir fries and rich sauces greet customers at the door of the Taiwanese bistro, Café 33, in Squirrel Hill.

Meiching “Jenny” Tao, the cafe's owner, seemed to be in several places at the same time, taking orders, serving food and working the cash register.   

She served bubble tea, a popular Taiwanese drink consisting of sweet milk tea and tapioca balls, while organizing her employees. She recommended pea shoots to a table of customers and proudly announced that she picked out the vegetables herself at the market that same morning.

Once the stir fried pea shoots in garlic were served, the customers looked delighted. They attempted to use chopsticks at first, but struggled and ultimately asked for forks. As one of her employees left in search of the utensils, Tao joked with the customers: “You can have a fork, but I’ll charge an extra dollar.” 

Credit Margaret Sun / 90.5 WESA

Tao moved to Pittsburgh from Taiwan in the 1990s and said she doesn’t plan on leaving any time soon. She followed her husband here for a job and said she has always felt the city was very accepting of her presence.

Originally, Tao and her husband started the restaurant with the idea to have a small, family-oriented place to make ends meet and they opened Café 33 in 2016.

Credit Margaret Sun / 90.5 WESA

“I’ve spent most of my life in the restaurant business, so it’s always been my dream to open my own place,” Tao said. “I’m so grateful the restaurant has become so successful and I really hope to stay in Pittsburgh and continue running it.”

Tao is part of a growing group of Chinese and Taiwanese immigrants who have chosen to open their restaurants in the city

There are more than two dozen Asian restaurants in Squirrel Hill, which together with Shadyside and Oakland had the highest percentage of Asian residents in 2010 ranging between 15 and 20 percent.

In 2011, Asians represented 4.68 percent of Pittsburgh’s population. In 2015, it increased by 25 percent to 5.94, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Pittsburgh has also strengthened ties to China, as Allegheny County officials recently visited the country and procured a deal with Caissa Touristic to offer nonstop flights between Pittsburgh and China. 

These restaurants serve authentic cuisine, meals honest to the culture from which they derived. Tao said part of this increasing demand has been created by Chinese students flocking to the top-tier schools in Pittsburgh and American-born Chinese residents.

While about half Tao’s customers are those familiar with her food, she’s also noticed an equal interest from non-Asian Pittsburghers. For these patrons, she’s flexible with her menu.

“I try to keep my dishes as authentic as possible, but if the customer really wants it, I can make changes for them," she said.

Credit Margaret Sun / 90.5 WESA

Dr. Yueming Yu, an assistant professor of Chinese Studies at Carnegie Mellon, said that Chinese culture revolves around the food. She said that its importance can be traced back to Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism.

“It’s not just to fill your stomach,” said Yu. “In Chinese, we call it 色香味型俱全 sè xiāngwèi xíng jùquán, which translates into color, smell and taste. First is the color, so make dishes look appealing. Then, when you get nearer, you notice the smell which makes you want to try it. Then, of course, it has to taste good.”

On top of that, in Chinese cooking, the benefits of the individual ingredients are factored into creating a healthy meal.

“In China we say 食疗shí liáo, which means to treat a disease with food,” said Yu.

For example, Yu said there are “cold” and “warm” foods which should be consumed in varying amounts depending on the season to keep the body healthy and in balance.

Dr. Freddie Fu, chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at UPMC, recalled that when he first moved to Pittsburgh, authentic Chinese restaurants were hard to find.

“I remember in the '70s when I went to this restaurant called Peking Royal Kitchen in Squirrel Hill. On Sundays they would only have four portions of hé fěn (a rice noodle dish) and that was it,” Fu said.  

Fu said he’s since seen the restaurant scene expand and improve. He said he often takes his friends to experience what he calls “real Chinese food” at places like Café 33. He encourages them to try his favorite dishes, like soup dumplings, and shows them how to use chopsticks properly. He said that in order to respect another culture, you must learn about it first. 

Credit Margaret Sun / 90.5 WESA

“You have to think outside of the box,” Fu said. “Life is full of different priorities and one should not have the time nor the energy to disrespect other cultures.”

Food is communication, Tao explained, and a way to create understanding between different cultures. Challenging her customers to use chopsticks is just one way Tao tries to get westerners to experience her native cuisine.

“I want to share and teach about culture, because it’s an important part of who I am,” said Tao.

Credit Margaret Sun / 90.5 WESA

This is reflected in Tao’s special dish, farmer’s noodles, which she said represents her childhood home in Taiwan. It was the go-to lunch dish that wives would bring out to their husbands in the rice fields. She said with every Farmer’s Noodles she serves, she is serving a piece of her childhood.

Anna Wan, a senior at Taylor Allderdice High School, said Chinese food and the restaurants in Pittsburgh have helped her and other American-born Chinese connect with their culture.

“A lot of kids I interact with at Chinese school are the children of restaurant owners and it’s great to see they’re very proud of that,” Wan said.

Still, Wan, who has written about being American-born Chinese, has strong feelings about Americanized Chinese food.

“I hope that in the future, different steps will be taken towards being more authentic," Wan said. "I think that will be tied with also accepting real Chinese culture as a whole rather than a very compromised and white version of it.”

Yu said she, too, wouldn’t mind a reversal of Americanizing Chinese food.

“The more people here learn about Chinese culture and food, the more I hope it will have an effect on American food. They can learn to make their food healthier and tastier,” said Yu.

Источник: https://www.wesa.fm/food-drink/2017-05-18/chinese-food-is-communication-connecting-cultures-in-pittsburgh

: Chinese food pittsburgh

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