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rate my professor west valley college

Professor in the Sociology department at West Valley College. 72%. Would take again. 2. Level of Difficulty. Rate Professor Ho. West Valley-Mission College District · West Valley College · Accreditation · Accessibility Statement · SmartPass · Employment · Donate · A-Z Index. teacher. She was recruited by a woman at Cal State It was impressive to see my fellow citizens first- College of Applied Sciences and.

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Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine

If you need information on Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine, then you are in the right place.


Rate My Professors - Review Teachers and Professors ...

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/campusRatings.jsp?sid=1289
    I think Penn State Brandywine was a great start to my college career. I'm apart of the 2+2 plan and I think going to Brandywine was a great way to ease into college life. You do really have to try if you want to have a social life there, and some profs. are very low quality. I highly recommend joining THON, hands-down best decision I ever made.

Rate My Professors - Review Teachers and Professors ...

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/campusRatings.jsp?sid=758
    Rate My Professors is the best college professor reviews and ratings source based on student feedback. Over 1.8 million professors and 15 million reviews. Find and rate a professor!

Daniel Parrish at Pennsylvania State ... - Rate My Professors

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=681778
    If you're coming to Penn State Brandywine, and you're taking a math class, make sure to not take Parrish as your teacher. This teacher just lectures and lectures, and doesn't even go over the materials to prepare for a test and a quiz. I didn't get a good grade on the first test, and that's because he can't go over the material properly!

Angela Putman at Pennsylvania State ... - Rate My Professors

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=2100521
    Professor in the Communication department at Pennsylvania State University Brandywine. 94%. ... Rate Professor Putman. I'm Professor PutmanSubmit a Correction. Professor Putman's Top Tags. Gives good ... she was a good professor in my opinion but you had to work hard to get the grade you want. the speeches were not that bad as long as you did ...

Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/
    Penn State Brandywine is planning to hold an in-person commencement ceremony to celebrate our Spring 2021 graduates and the completion of their academic journey. Commencement ceremonies are momentous occasions for our students, their families, and our University community, and we are excited to be celebrating in person this spring.

Faculty and Staff Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/faculty-staff
    Penn State Brandywine is Philadelphia's "next-door" neighbor. The 112-acre campus lies just 20 miles west of Center City and offers four-year baccalaureate degree programs, associate degree programs and workplace professional education programs.

John Baffoe-Bonnie Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/person/john-baffoe-bonnie
    John Baffoe-Bonnie is a professor of Economics at Pennsylvania State University, Brandywine Campus. He was born in Ghana and received his Ph.D. degree in economics from Dalhousie University, Canada, in 1985. Prior to joining the Pennsylvania State University in 1988, he held faculty positions at the University of Manitoba (Canada) and Drexel University in Philadelphia (USA) where he taught …

Academics Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/academics
    Penn State Brandywine is Philadelphia's "next-door" neighbor. The 112-acre campus lies just 20 miles west of Center City and offers four-year baccalaureate degree programs, associate degree programs and workplace professional education programs.

Did you find the information you are interested in about Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine?

We hope you have found all the information you are interested in on Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine. There is also a lot of other information related to wine on our website.

Источник: https://visit-winery.com/r-wine/rate-my-professor-penn-state-brandywine.html

Faculty - Graduate Education

Graduate Education

Edward Aguiles (2004) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., West Virginia University; M.A., Kean University; M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Frank Alfano (2005) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., William Paterson University; M.A., New Jersey City University; Ed.D., Fordham University

Nina-Louise Alsbrook (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., St. John's University

Jennifer Ayala (2004) Assistant Professor, B.A., M.A., Montclair State University; M.Phil, Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center

John Baltz (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's University

Addie Boyd (2001) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., Montclair State University; Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Edward Brandt (2017) Adjunct Lecturer, B.S., Bloomsburg University; M.S., Delaware Valley College

Terrence Brennan (2012) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University

Kimberly A. Case (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., St. John Fisher College; M.Ed., University of Georgia; Ph.D., New York University

Michael Caulfield (2010) Adjunct Lecturer, J.D., Loyola University

Lorraine Cella (2011) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University

Francis Cherichello (2010) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Seton Hall University

Jung-ah Choi (2015) Assistant Professor, B.A., Seoul National University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Anna Cicirelli1 (1981) Associate Dean and Director of the Ed.D. Program, B.A., Saint Peter’s University; M.A., Rutgers University; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University

Joseph Cirillo (2008) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Saint Peter's University

James Clayton (2005) Assistant Professor, B.S., Saint Peter’s College; M.A., Montclair State University; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University

Michael Corso (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Montclair State University

Sr. Elizabeth D'Alessio (2015) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., College of St. Elizabeth, M.A., St. Joseph Seminary; M.A., Georgian Court University; Ed.D., College of St. Elizabeth

Lauren Daniel (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.S., Seton Hall University

Dennis Degnan (2010) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Joseph Doria, Jr.1 (1969-1998, 2011)) Dean, B.A., Saint Peter's University; M.A., Boston College; Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University

Michael Finetti (2007) Assistant Professor, B.S. Rutgers University; M.A. Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Albert Galloway (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ph.D., Seton Hall University

Pedro Garrido (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., New Jersey City University

John Hammett (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Rutgers University

Henry F. Harty1 (1972) Professor Emeritus of Education, B.S., Saint Peter’s College; M.S., Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Rutgers University

Mark Hayes (2002) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., New Jersey City University; Ph.D., Fordham University

James P. Jacobson1(1967) Associate Professor, B.A., M.A., New Jersey City University; M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Tiffany Jacobson (2007) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., New Jersey City University

Ross Kasun (2011) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Melvin L. Klein (2009) Adjunct Lecturer, B.S. Ed., Slippery Rock State College; M.S. Ed., University of Pittsburgh

Patricia Kowalski (2001) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Robert Kravitz (2003) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

Martin P. LaGrow (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Martin Luther College; M.A., Saint Xavier University

Maria Del Carmen Lella (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's University

Steven Locascio (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Nicole Luongo (2007) Assistant Professor, B.S. Bucknell University, M.A. Seton Hall, Ed.D., Nova Southeastern

Thomas MacNamara (2014) Adjunct Professor, M.A., New Jersey City University

Thomas Matarazzo (2005) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., St. Francis University; M.A., New Jersey City University; Ed.D., California Coast University; Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Dennis McCafferty (2012) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

James McLaughlin (2007) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D. Seton Hall University

Ernest Mignoli (2002) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Joseph T. Pace (1992) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Saint Peter’s College; M.A., Fordham University

Joseph Papaj, S.J. (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M. Divinity, Woodstock College

Joslin Mar-Dai Pickens (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., Grambling State University; Ed.D., Louisiana State University

Michael Pierson (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ph.D., Capella University

John Powers (1997) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Saint Peter's College; M.A., New York University; M.A. New School University; M.A. New Jersey City University

Johanna Roberto (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

James M. Scanlon1(1981) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., lona College; M.A., Montclair State University; M.Ed., William Paterson University; Ph.D., Fordham University

James Schmitt (2012) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

Dennis Sevano(1993) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A. Montclair State University

Mark Silk (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., State University of New York of Albany

Mark Somerville (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M.S.W., Columbia University

Albert Spiegel (2011) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

Brandi L. Stocker (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Lindsey Wilson College; M.A., Ed.D., Eastern Kentucky University

David Turi (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ph.D., Seton Hall University

Steve Wizniewski (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Robert Zywicki (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Ed.D.,Saint Peter's College

Footnotes

1 Bene Merenti

Источник: https://catalogs.saintpeters.edu/graduate/graduateeducation/faculty/

A man who was shot to death in San Jose was identified Monday as 37-year-old David Moglen, an economics professor with a penchant for underground, socially conscious hip hop, according to his employers, police and social media sites.

Moglen was gunned down about 10 p.m. on July 28, at Willow and Sherman streets, making him the city's 29th homicide victim, police said.

Police provided no other details. But the Mercury News reported he had been chasing a person who had just robbed him. No suspect has been identified.

"He was the kind of person who took an interest in his students," said Denise Swett, Foothill College vice president of student services, where Moglen was teaching this summer. "He took the time to relate to his students and have them be successful."

At Evergreen Valley College, where Moglen had been teaching for the last 12 years, the president, Henry Yong, said he was "deeply saddened." Moglen had been scheduled to teach again this fall. Yong said that Moglen ahd "touched the lives of countless students" and was "highly regarded and respected."

Nazy Gloyan was a student in Moglen's class several years ago and said the educator took time to hear students' perspectives.

One anonymous student wrote on "Rate My Professors" that the news was "absolutely heartbreaking. While I only knew him five weeks, he was a wonderful man and a great teacher."

Moglen's LinkedIn profile indicates he also had taught within the West Valley-Mission Community College District. He specialized in macroeconomics and personal finance. He wrote two books and was behind Raven Odin's hip hop album, "Illicon Valley," according to his blog.

The album is about capturing the "angst and struggle of edging out of poverty into the lower rungs of the more privileged classes."

Moglen leaves behind two daughters.

Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to contact the San Jose Police Department's Homicide Unit at 408-277-5283. Anyone who wants to remain anonymous can call the Crime Stoppers Tip Line at 408-947-7867.

Источник: https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/foothill-economics-professor-david-moglen-killed-in-san-jose/69095/

Get to Know the U Quick facts about the University of Utah


8,948 Graduates

2020 UNIVERSITY OF UTAH AWARDED DEGREES

#1

The U is the best in the nation for technology commercialization (Milken Institute rankings)

17:1

student-to-faculty ratio, the lowest among Utah public institutions

70%

70% of freshmen graduate within 6 years, the highest graduation rate of any public university in the state.

LOWEST TUITION

Among its Pac12 and Big10 public peers, the University of Utah’s tuition, both in and out-of-state, is the lowest.

Social & Media See what’s being discussed & shared around the U


Источник: https://www.utah.edu/

Is Glenn Eldridge a homophobic, racist, misogonistic, drug addicted professor?

bad professor, chemistry, drug addicted, glenn eldridge, homophobic, misogonistic, racist, rate my professor, Uncategorized, west, west valley college
  • Why does Professor Glenn Eldridge of West Valley College who teaches Chemistry at West Valley College ask you to tell him if you are a first generation college student, how many hours you work, what you major is, what colleges you want to attend, what your goals are? Is it okay for a professor to practice affirmative action when grading other students?

    • Is is true that he will discriminate against students that are working part time jobs while taking his chemistry course? Why do you think it is that he bashed so many students who told him that they work part time and take his class?

  • Why does Professor Glenn Eldridge think that the words “faggot”, “queer”, “butt fucker” are okay to use? Is it professional and ethical to tell a class that “faggots go to hell”? Do you think that this is offensive?

    • Is is true that Professor Glenn Eldridge called a student a “faggot” in office hours?

  • Why is it that every semester Professor Glenn Eldridge has a 90% attrition rate of minority students while white students stay?

    • Is it true that he uses the words “nigger”, “spick”, “wetback”, “chink”, “gook”, “push dot”, and “doon coon” to describe students in his class that were not passionate about chemistry?

  • Why is it that the highest percentage of students who drop Professor Glenn Eldridge’s chemistry class are women?

    • Is is true that Professor Glenn Eldridge of West Valley College tells women that they should change their major because women cannot be scientist or good at STEM subjects? Does this mean that Glenn Eldridge is an extreme misogonist?

    • What would get a professor to call a female student a “bitch”?

  • What do you think would compel a professor to abuse prescription drugs such as Adderall or illegal drugs such as methamphetamine?

    • Why did Professor Glenn Eldridge of West Valley College teach students about methamphetamine and its manurfacturing?

 

Like this:

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Источник: https://glenneldridge.wordpress.com/2016/08/28/is-glenn-eldridge-a-homophobic-racist-misogonistic-and-drug-addicted-professor/

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Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine

If you need information on Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine, then you are in the right place.


Rate My Professors - Review Teachers and Professors .

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/campusRatings.jsp?sid=1289
    I think Penn State Brandywine was a great start to my college career. I'm apart of the 2+2 plan and I think going to Brandywine was a great way to ease into college life. You do really have to try if you want to have a social life there, and some profs. are very low quality. I highly recommend joining THON, hands-down best decision I ever made.

Rate My Professors - Review Teachers and Professors .

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/campusRatings.jsp?sid=758
    Rate My Professors is the best college professor reviews and ratings source based on student feedback. Over 1.8 million professors and 15 million reviews. Find and rate a professor!

Daniel Parrish at Pennsylvania State . - Rate My Professors

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=681778
    If you're coming to Penn State Brandywine, and you're taking a math class, make sure to not take Parrish as your teacher. This teacher just lectures and lectures, and doesn't even go over the materials to prepare for a test and a quiz. I didn't get a good grade on the first test, and that's because he can't go over the material properly!

Angela Putman at Pennsylvania State . - Rate My Professors

    https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=2100521
    Professor in the Communication department at Pennsylvania State University Brandywine. 94%. . Rate Professor Putman. I'm Professor PutmanSubmit a Correction. Professor Putman's Top Tags. Gives good . she was a good professor in my opinion but you had to work hard to get the grade you want. the speeches were not that bad as long as you did .

Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/
    Penn State Brandywine is planning to hold an in-person commencement ceremony to celebrate our Spring 2021 graduates and the completion of their academic journey. Commencement ceremonies are momentous occasions for our students, their families, and our University community, and we are excited to be celebrating in person this spring.

Faculty and Staff Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/faculty-staff
    Penn State Brandywine is Philadelphia's "next-door" neighbor. The 112-acre campus lies just 20 miles west of Center City and offers four-year baccalaureate degree programs, associate degree programs and workplace professional education programs.

John Baffoe-Bonnie Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/person/john-baffoe-bonnie
    John Baffoe-Bonnie is a professor of Economics at Pennsylvania State University, Brandywine Campus. He was born in Ghana and received his Ph.D. degree in economics from Dalhousie University, Canada, in 1985. Prior to joining the Pennsylvania State University in 1988, he held faculty positions at the University of Manitoba (Canada) and Drexel University in Philadelphia (USA) where he taught …

Academics Penn State Brandywine

    https://www.brandywine.psu.edu/academics
    Penn State Brandywine is Philadelphia's "next-door" neighbor. The 112-acre campus lies just 20 miles west of Center City and offers four-year baccalaureate degree programs, associate degree programs and workplace professional education programs.

Did you find the information you are interested in about Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine?

We hope you have found all the information you are interested in on Rate My Professor Penn State Brandywine. There is also a lot of other information related to wine on our website.

Источник: https://visit-winery.com/r-wine/rate-my-professor-penn-state-brandywine.html

Education

Ph.D. American Studies, University of Michigan (2016)
M.A., American Studies, University of Michigan (2011) 
B.A. History, Religion, University of the Pacific (2009) 

Selected Publications

Book:

“Sowing the Sacred: Mexican Pentecostal Farmworkers in California, 1916-1966” (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2022)

Edited Collections:

Recovering Apostolic Histories & Theologies: Race, Gender, and Culture in Oneness Pentecostalism.”Edited with Andrea Johnson and Daniel Ramírez (Penn State University Press, forthcoming 2023)

“Latinx and Latin American Religion in North America” (Bloomsbury Religion in North America 2022)

Articles and Chapters:

“Latina/o Pentecostalism” in the Oxford Handbook on Latinx Christianities (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2022)

“Pentecostalism’s Instrumental Faith and Alternative Power: Cesar Chávez and Reies López Tijerina Among Pentecostal Farmworkers 1954-1956” in Faith and Power: Latino Religious Politics since 1945 eds. Felipe Hinojosa, Sergio Gonzalez, and Maggie Elmore (New York University Press, forthcoming rate my professor west valley college, 121-44.

“Latinx Legacies and Leadership in the U.S. Sanctuary Movement 1980-2020”  American Religion (forthcoming, 2021) co-authored with Tatyana Castillo-Ramos

“Latinx Christianities in North America,” Main Article, Bloomsbury Religion in North Americ(2021)

“Borderlands Believers: Migrant Laborers and the Growth of Pentecostalism from Los Angeles” in Religion in Los Angeles, eds., Diane Winston and Richard Flory (Routledge, 2021), 58-73.

“Capturing the Church Familia: Scriptural Documents and Photographs on the Agricultural Labor Circuit” in Critical Diálogos in Latina and Latino Studies eds., Ana Ramos-Zayas and Mérida Rua (New York University Press, 2021), 457-475

“The Borderlands Aesthetics of Mexican-American Pentecostalism” in Protestant Aesthetics and the Arts, eds., Kathryn Reklis and Sarah Covington (Routledge, 2020), 252-264

“Trump’s Wall: A Monument of (Un)Civil Religion” Material and Visual Cultures of Religion MAVCOR hosted by Yale University Press (September 2019)

"Sacred Resistance: The Sanctuary Movement From Reagan to Trump," Perspectivas16 (2019): 11-36, co-authored with Tatyana Castillo-Ramos

 ----Also published in Spanish in the same journal issue as: “Resistencia Sagrada: El Movimiento Santuario desde           Reagan a Trump” pp. 38-66.

The New Issue: Approaches to Oneness Pentecostalism, ”Religion Compass(12:11) (November 2018) co-authored with Andrea Johnson

“Farmworker Frames: Apostólico Counter Narratives in California’s Valleys,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion(86:3) (September 2018): 691-723.

“More Spirit in that Little Madera Church: Cesar Chavez and Borderlands Religious Soundscapes 1954-1966,” California History(94:1); (Spring 2017): 26-42

“Jesus Would Be Jim Crowed: Bishop Robert Lawson on Race and Religion in the Harlem Renaissance,” Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion (6:3); (2015): 1-32

Selected Conference Presentations

"Migrating Faith in Photos” American Society for Church History, annual conference, New Orleans, LA, January 6-9, 2022.

“La Migra No Profana El Santuario: Latinx Sanctuary Movement Leaders in the Age of Trump” American Academy of Religion, annual conference, San Diego, CA, November 22-26, 2019 (co-presented with Tatyana Castillo-Ramos)

“Unwrapping History: Women and the Maturation of Mexican-American Pentecostal Churches in America” American Historical Association, annual meeting, Chicago, IL, January 3-6, 2019

"Temples Made with Hands: Mexican Pentecostal Women and the Construction of Farmworker Temples in the Central Valley" Organization of American Historians, annual meeting, Sacramento, CA, April 12-14, 2018.

“Through the Lens of the Subaltern: Mexican-Pentecostal Narratives and Church Family Photographs” American Academy of Religion, annual conference, Boston, MA, November 18-21, 2017.

“Reforming Chicanas/os and Christians: Pentecostals and the Pursuit of El Valle De Paz” American Society for Church History, annual conference, Denver, CO, January 5-8, 2017.

“The Dust District: Cosmopolitan and Okie Pentecostal Convergence in California” The American Academy of Religion, annual conference, San Antonio, TX, November 19-22, 2016.

“Estéticas Apostólicas en la Fronteriza” (translation: Apostolic Aesthetics in the Borderlands) Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México, annual conference, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mérida, Yucatán, April 15-17, 2015.

“Dust and Denominations: Pentecostalism and Migration in Farm Labor Communities of California’s Valleys 1917-1964” American Society for Church History –Ecclesiastical History Society joint conference, Oxford, England, April 3-5, 2014.

“Faith with Works: Cesar Chavez’s Religious Image” National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies 40th Annual Conference, Chicago, IL, March 14-17, 2012.

Awards

Louisville Institute's First Book Grant for Minority Scholars (2018-2019)

C3 Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship, Latina/o Studies and Religion, Williams College (2016-2017)

Scholarly Activities

Co-chair the History of Christianity unit of the American Academy of Religion (AAR)

Steering committee member of the Latina/o Religion, Culture, and Society unit of the AAR

Bloomsbury Religion in North America Advisory Board

Peer reviewer for various academic journal articles, books, and proposals

Consultant for archival collections on Latin American and Latina/o religious figures and organizations. 

Источник: https://www.amherst.edu/people/facstaff/lbarba

Is Glenn Eldridge a homophobic, racist, misogonistic, drug addicted professor?

bad professor, chemistry, drug addicted, glenn eldridge, homophobic, misogonistic, racist, rate my professor, Uncategorized, west, west valley college
  • Why does Professor Glenn Eldridge of West Valley College who teaches Chemistry at West Valley College ask you to tell him if you are a first generation college student, how many hours you work, what you major is, what colleges you want to attend, what your goals are? Is it okay for a professor to practice affirmative action when grading other students?

    • Is is true that he will discriminate against students that are working part time jobs while taking his chemistry course? Why do you think it is that he bashed so many students who told him that they work part time and take his class?

  • Why does Professor Glenn Eldridge think that the words “faggot”, “queer”, “butt fucker” are okay to use? Is it professional and ethical to tell a class that “faggots go to hell”? Do you think that this is offensive?

    • Is is true that Professor Glenn Eldridge called a student a “faggot” in office hours?

  • Why is it that every semester Professor Glenn Eldridge has a 90% attrition rate of minority students while white students stay?

    • Is it true that he uses the words “nigger”, “spick”, “wetback”, “chink”, “gook”, “push dot”, and “doon coon” to describe students in his class that were not passionate about chemistry?

  • Why is it that the highest percentage of students who drop Professor Glenn Eldridge’s chemistry class are women?

    • Is is true that Professor Glenn Eldridge of West Valley College tells women that they should change their major because women cannot be scientist or good at STEM subjects? Does this mean that Glenn Eldridge is an extreme misogonist?

    • What would get a professor to call a female student a “bitch”?

  • What do you think would compel a professor to abuse prescription drugs such as Adderall or illegal drugs such as methamphetamine?

    • Why did Professor Glenn Eldridge of West Valley College teach students about methamphetamine and its manurfacturing?

 

Like this:

LikeLoading.

Источник: https://glenneldridge.wordpress.com/2016/08/28/is-glenn-eldridge-a-homophobic-racist-misogonistic-and-drug-addicted-professor/

A man who was shot to death in San Jose was identified Monday as 37-year-old David Moglen, an economics professor with a penchant for underground, socially conscious hip hop, according to his employers, police and social media sites.

Moglen was gunned down about 10 p.m. on July 28, at Willow and Sherman streets, making him the city's 29th homicide victim, police said.

Police provided no other details. But the Mercury News reported he had been chasing a person who had just robbed him. No suspect has been identified.

"He was the kind of person who took an interest in his students," said Denise Swett, Foothill College vice president of student services, where Moglen was teaching this summer. "He took the time to relate to his students and have them be successful."

At Evergreen Valley College, where Moglen had been teaching for the last 12 years, the president, Henry Yong, said he was "deeply saddened." Moglen had been scheduled to teach again this fall. Yong said that Moglen ahd "touched the lives of countless students" and was "highly regarded and respected."

Nazy Gloyan was a student in Moglen's class several years ago and said the educator took time to hear students' perspectives.

One anonymous student wrote on "Rate My Professors" that the news was "absolutely heartbreaking. While I only knew him five weeks, he was a wonderful man and a great teacher."

Moglen's LinkedIn profile indicates he also had taught within the West Valley-Mission Community College District. He specialized in macroeconomics and personal finance. He wrote two books and was behind Raven Odin's hip hop album, "Illicon Valley," according to his blog.

The album is about capturing the "angst and struggle of edging out of poverty into the lower rungs of the more privileged classes."

Moglen leaves behind two daughters.

Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to contact the San Jose Police Department's Homicide Unit at 408-277-5283. Anyone who wants to remain anonymous can call the Crime Stoppers Tip Line at 408-947-7867.

Источник: https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/foothill-economics-professor-david-moglen-killed-in-san-jose/69095/

The good professor or the easy professor?

With the 2012-13 course registration opening next week, many students are hitting RateMyProfessors.com to decide which course sections they should aim for.

The website allows college students to rate their professors on overall quality, clarity, easiness and “hottness” [sic]. Students can also comment about the professors and give positive or negative feedback on their educational experience.

According to RateMyProfessors.com’s Facebook page, the site evaluates more than 1.5 million professors from over 7,500 colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada and the United Kingdom. GVSU has 2,453 professor reviews on the site and 200 comments about the school in general.

A 2008 study titled “Does RateMyProfessors.com nasb pocket bible zipper rate my professor?” for the “Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education” journal said the site shows students’ bias based on a professor’s personality, charisma and grading leniency, and that the information does not reveal a professor’s teaching effectiveness.

GVSU freshman Anna Biggio said she uses the site to help choose her classes.

“I want to find an easy and helpful professor for the class,” Biggio said, adding she finds the website helpful and effective because all of her professors have been great so far.

Although many students depend on the site, Bart Merkle, dean of students at GVSU, said students should be careful and cautious when using RateMyProfessors.com.

“You don’t know who is putting stuff up,” said Merkle, who has explored the site, himself, but said there is no real way of knowing if the information is credible. He added that there is not a way for students to crosscheck and validate comments that are being written on the website. “I think you are better off talking with people you know and trust.”

Biggio said she does not believe everything on the site and takes into account that “people who are interested in a class may find it easier than students who are indifferent,” and therefore give the professor better ratings.

The study argued that ratings on these websites could potentially be positive for both students and professors. For example, students can choose professors who fit their particular learning styles, and professors with negative comments can learn from the ratings and improve their performances.

While many students use the website to evaluate professors, Mary Schutten, associate dean for students for CLAS, said she does not know of any deans that use the site to determine whether to hire or keep certain professors.

“Deans would not use this site as it is not part of the evaluation process of professors (at GVSU).” Schutten said.

Merkle said the university uses its own course evaluations at the end of each semester to get student feedback about classes and professors.

The study also showed that professors with characteristics such as easiness and attractiveness, as perceived by students, had more positive ratings and comments.

RateMyProfessor.com has been around for 13 years and was the inspiration for other evaluation websites like Myedu.com, ProfessorPerformance.com and RateMyTeacher.com.

For more professional advice about course selection, visit an advisor or the GVSU advising department. For more information on course registration dates, check that website at www.gvsu.edu/schedule/registration-schedule-for-2012-2013-72.htm.

[email protected]

Источник: https://lanthorn.com/52958/news/the_good_professor_or_the_easy_professor/

California education news: What’s the latest?

Friday, December 3, 2021, 9:33 am

Link copied.UC San Diego requests Covid-19 tests after Thanksgiving break

UC San Diego asked all students to get a Covid-19 test as soon as possible if they traveled during Thanksgiving break, regardless of their vaccination status, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The paper reports the call to get tested “as soon as possible” is a sharp change in tone for the university. Last year, the school asked students not to travel during Thanksgiving or get tested before they left. This year, the school didn’t call for either action.

The urgent message is likely connected to concern over the Omicron variant.

Zaidee Stavely

Friday, December 3, 2021, 9:32 am

Link copied.Alpine Union to allow in-person learning off campus for unvaccinated students

Alpine Union School District, a small district in San Diego County, has plans to allow unvaccinated students to keep learning in person, with district teachers, but off campus, to get around the state vaccine mandate.

According to The Washington Post, the district’s superintendent, Rich Newman, wrote a letter to parents saying, “This unique program is the first of its kind designed to provide in-person learning to students who would not be able to attend school on campus if not vaccinated.”

“In the midst of a highly politicized environment, it’s my responsibility to serve students who are vaccinated or not vaccinated,” Newman told the newspaper. “I’m working with parents who feel very strongly about this. These kids are young and are caught in an interesting, complex and political time with no choice of their own.”

Some parents applaud the move, while others accuse the district of segregating unvaccinated students from their peers.

The district had also previously planned to allow parents to choose whether their children wore a mask at school, before the state mandated that all students wear masks indoors.

Zaidee Stavely

Thursday, December 2, 2021, 9:51 am

Link copied.San Diego analysis ties chances of Covid-19 death to education level

An analysis of death certificates by the non-profit news site Voice of San Diego has found that people without a high-school diploma died from Covid-19 during the first year of the pandemic at a disproportionally high rate compared to more educated people.

In an article entitled “The First Year of COVID: A college degree was ‘an insurance policy’ against death,” the site reported, “during the first year of the pandemic, the share of San Diegans without a high school degree who died of Covid-19 was nearly three times as high as their share of the county population. San Diegans with a college degree, meanwhile, died at much lower rates than their share of the population.”

An expert suggested the high death rate for under-educated people was because they had manual jobs that didn’t allow them to stay home during the pandemic.

“Those who don’t have a bachelor’s degree or a high school degree are more likely to work in manual activities, customer service, agriculture, manufacturing and other economic activities that don’t allow them to stay safely at home,” Arturo Bustamante, a UCLA public health associate professor, told the Voice of San Diego.

Reporters entered information from more than 4,000 death certificates – which include the person’s education level – into a database in order to do the analysis.

 

Thomas Peele

Thursday, December 2, 2021, 9:49 am

Link copied.Lottery admissions to San Francisco’s top high school to stay in place for next school year

A lottery system for admission to San Francisco’s top high school will likely stay in place for another year despite a judge’s ruling that the city’s school board violated state law when it ditched competitive admissions, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Superintendent Vince Mathews told the newspaper that there is not enough time to return to merit-based admissions to Lowell High School for the next academic year.

“We recognize that in light of the recent court decision, families are anxious to know what the admissions process will be for applying to Lowell for the 2022-2023 school year,” he said in a statement. “It would be logistically impossible to establish and implement any selective admission criteria prior to the application of Feb. 4 so I am recommending we maintain our current admissions practice at Lowell for the upcoming year.”

The San Francisco School  Board voted in February to end competitive admission at Lowell, causing an uproar. Parents sued.

Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman ruled in November that the board “clearly failed” to follow the state’s open meetings law, the Ralph M. Brown Act, when it voted to make the change,

Thomas Peele

Wednesday, December 1, 2021, 10:45 am

Link copied.UC, CSU extend deadlines after being flooded with applications

Application deadlines have been extended at the University of California and California State University campuses after both systems were flooded with applications Tuesday, crashing their online portals, the Los Angeles Times reported.

At UC’s nine undergraduate campuses, the deadline was extended from Tuesday at 11:59 p.m. to Wednesday at the same time, though students need to have started their application by Tuesday to be considered.

At CSU, deadlines were extended to Wednesday for the Fullerton, Long Beach and San Luis Obispo campuses. The deadline for applications to Fresno, Los Angeles, Pomona, San Diego and San Jose was extended to Dec. 15. All other campus deadlines were already set for Dec. 15 or later.

Michael Burke

Wednesday, December 1, 2021, 10:32 am

Link copied.Cal State requires vaccination for Covid-19, but doesn’t evenly enforce it

California State University requires students to be vaccinated for COVID-19 — but the policy is not evenly enforced, CapRadio reported. 

While the vaccine mandate likely has helped avoid large outbreaks of COVID-19, it is being inconsistently enforced across the system more than a month after the deadline. Some campuses barred students from in-person classes and on-campus buildings without proof of vaccination or requesting an exemption, while others allowed them to continue attending.

The lack of stable enforcement makes some students feel unsafe, and public health experts say it risks undermining the effectiveness of the safety policy. Yet others, including the Cal State Student Association and some campus administrators, say the flexibility is necessary to avoid penalizing students who come from communities where they have less access to the vaccine.

“The policy is that if you’re accessing campus facilities, you need to be vaccinated. How they enforce that is up to the discretion of the campuses,” said Cal State Chancellor’s Office spokesperson Michael Uhlenkamp, CapRadio reported. 

The CSU Chancellor’s Office is allowing campus presidents to take their needs into account when deciding how to implement the mandate, Uhlenkamp said, but told them to do everything possible to avoid disenrolling students. 

Karen D'Souza

Wednesday, December 1, 2021, 9:36 am

Link copied.84% of parents are overwhelmed by cost of child care, survey shows

Eighty-four percent of parents feel overwhelmed by the high cost of child care, according to a new survey from the Penny Hoarder. 

As Biden’s social safety net bill makes its way through Congress, American families continue to struggle with child care while making ends meet. The survey also showed that 40% of parents have gone into debt over the costs of child care, almost 38% of parents have had to take on a second job to pay for care and almost 28% of parents say they’ve had to choose between paying for child care or paying their rent.

“Working families across the country pay a significant percentage of their annual earnings to cover the price of child care,” said Mario Cardona, chief of policy and practice for Child Care Aware of America, a national child care advocacy organization, as the Penny Hoarder cited.

The personal finance website surveyed 2,000 parents in September about how child care impacts their lives. Despite extra financial support in the form of pandemic stimulus checks and child tax credits this year, researchers noted, a large majority of families felt overburdened.

 

Karen D'Souza

Tuesday, November 30, 2021, 7:13 pm

Link copied.Fewer California families opt to open private home schools this year

During the height of the pandemic, a record 35,000 families had filed an affidavit with rate my professor west valley college state to open a private home school, but the numbers are far lower this year, according to California Department of Education records.

So far this school year, 25,109 families have filed a homeschool affidavit to operate a school with five or fewer students – the number the state Department of Education says is likely to be a home school. That is 4,000 fewer than by the same time last year when more than 29,000 families had filed the paperwork.

Despite the decrease in affidavits over last year, this year’s total is still higher than any other past year. In 2019-20 a total of 22,433 affidavits were filed. Before that, about 15,000 families a year filed affidavits to run home schools with five or fewer students.

Filing a private school affidavit annually is one way to home-school a child in California. Families also can choose a home study program through a public school or can enroll their children in a private school that offers home-schooling options.

Parents who file an affidavit do not have the oversight or guidance provided by a school district or public charter school. Instead, they must provide all the curriculum, materials and instruction for their children. They also do not receive funds to cover the cost of supplies, outside classes or extracurricular activities that charter schools usually provide.

 

Diana Lambert

Tuesday, November 30, 2021, 3:24 pm

Link copied.75% of Sacramento City Unified’s students miss vaccination deadline

Only a quarter of Sacramento City Unified School District’s middle and high school students have turned in proof they had received at least one Covid-19 vaccine by today — the district’s deadline to meet its vaccine mandate.

The district of nearly 48,000 students joins Culver City Unified, West Contra Costa Unified, Oakland Unified, Piedmont Unified, San Diego Unified and Los Angeles Unified in requiring vaccines for eligible students and staff rate my professor west valley college of the state mandate that begins next summer.

Sacramento City Unified has 19,271 students in the age group covered by the mandate, but only 4,909 have turned in paperwork showing they had been vaccinated, according to the district’s website.

Although the district did not post information about the number of staff who have been vaccinated, representatives from the teachers union told a reporter at KCRA that more than 90% of the district’s teachers had shown proof of vaccination.

Students who are not vaccinated by Feb. 1 — the beginning of the second semester — will be assigned to independent study, according to the district website. In the meantime, students and staff who are not yet vaccinated will be tested regularly.

Diana Lambert

Tuesday, November 30, 2021, 9:34 am

Link copied.Gaming giant Roblox intends to bring K-12 education to the ‘metaverse’

The $73 billion gaming company Roblox is poised to position itself as a leader in bringing classroom education into the “metaverse” — the evolving virtual world currently enthralling Silicon Valley.

Education Week reported Monday that the San Mateo-based company aims to reach 100 million students worldwide by the end of the decade and eventually host virtual classrooms in place of Zoom or other platforms. The company’s head of education, Rebecca Kantar, also is eyeing the platform as a host for virtual reading lessons or experiences that allow students from across the globe to collaborate in real time on science experiments.

Earlier this month, Education Week reported, Roblox announced a $10 million Roblox Community Fund to support the creation of online learning experiences that use its platform. The company seeks to expand the use of its platform for computer-science education, as well as other curricular activities.

Roblox emerged in 2006 as a free gaming platform that allowed users to create their own avatars, program their own games and play games created by other users. According to Education Week, more than 47 million people use the platform every day, nearly half of whom are younger than 13. Some of the platform’s games are educational and can be tied to academic lessons. Roblox is frequently used to teach children beginner coding skills, but its use in the K-12 education sector accounts for only a small part of its popularity.

A July New York Times article featured Roblox as possibly “the nearest and most expansive vision of the metaverse.” The New York Times reported on the “darker side” of the Roblox metaverse, which includes games involving strip clubs, Nazi re-enactments and other adult and problematic activities. The company said it does not condone these games.

Ali Tadayon

Tuesday, November 30, 2021, 8:24 am

Link copied.Supply shortages complicate challenges of school lunch programs

Widespread supply chain shortages have hit school lunch programs, too, causing school staffs to order in bulk further in advance, substitute ingredients, order more fruit and vegetables and scramble to find hamburgers and other student favorites.

Plus, higher prices for paper products and food are putting pressure on lunch budgets.

High schools in Alhambra Unified had to cut back on their food bar offerings of ramen, pho, Korean tacos, Mexican street tacos and other items. Vivien Watts, the 16,000-student district’s executive director of food and nutrition services, said she’s not confident she can consistently find the ingredients.

“It’s really heartbreaking for us because we want to provide the best food for our kids,” Watts told the San Bernardino Sun. “We can only put on the menu what we know we can get.”

The newspaper attributed the shortages to labor shortages at food distribution centers caused by the pandemic and bottlenecks in delivering cargo at the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports. These problems add to school districts’ challenge of providing free breakfast and lunch to all students, under a universal meals program that Congress has funded for the second year. Gov. Gavin Newsom has promised it will become permanent, with state funding, starting next year.

“We’re working magic to make it happen,” Riverside Unified School District spokeswoman Diana Meza said. “But all schools are doing that. There’s a lot more preparation involved.”

John Fensterwald

Monday, November 29, 2021, 4:43 pm

Link copied.State rejects Oakland Unified’s request to avoid county oversight

The Alameda County Office of Education can impose stricter oversight of Oakland Unified’s budget and hiring practices, the California Department of Education ruled on Monday.

The county office of education had warned the school board two weeks ago that it would bring in a fiscal management team to review the district’s finances, out of concerns that the board would be unable to cut tens of millions of dollars from its budget. The school board appealed to the state, and the state sided with the Alameda County Office of Education.

According to the county office of education, Oakland Unified faces declining enrollment and has not prepared to reduce staffing or adopted a long-term financial plan, endangering the fiscal health of the district. County Superintendent L.K. Monroe threatened to withhold pay from the school board and superintendent, which the state agreed she has a right to do.

“It is reasonable for the (Alameda County Office of Education) to provide additional rate my professor west valley college to the district to identify budget solutions in a timely manner and possibly avoid deeper reductions and more intensive interventions at a later date,” according to the state.

Carolyn Jones

Monday, November 29, 2021, 9:48 am

Link copied.Court temporarily blocks San Diego Unified’s Covid vaccine mandate

A panel of federal judges issued a temporary restraining order on Sunday stopping San Diego Unified from requiring Covid vaccinations for students age 16 and over, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals granted the order a day before students would need their first vaccine dose to comply with the requirement, which would have gone into effect Dec. 20. In its ruling, the judges sided with a student who rate my professor west valley college sued the district claiming the mandate discriminated against those who oppose the vaccine on religious grounds.

The order states that the district’s mandate allowed students to postpone getting the vaccine for medical reasons, but should have granted the same flexibility for students who oppose the vaccine for religious reasons.

The second-largest district in California, San Diego Unified has 121,000 students. The vaccine mandate would have required students age 16 and over to be vaccinated in order to attend school in person.

Carolyn Jones

Monday, November 29, 2021, 9:47 am

Link copied.California Attorney General Rob Bonta files brief supporting transgender students

California Attorney General Rob Bonta weighed in Monday on a Florida case involving the rights of transgender students to use school bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

Bonta, along with 23 other state attorneys general, filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the Adams v. School Board of St. Johns County lawsuit, which centers on a school district’s unwritten policy barring transgender students from using bathrooms aligned with their gender identity.

“The law is clear: Discrimination based on gender identity is still discrimination,” Bonta said. “Allowing students to use the bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity is a no-brainer. It affirms who they are and helps create a school environment where everyone can grow and thrive. Transgender teenagers shouldn’t have to be in court to prove they are entitled to respect. California proudly stands in support of Drew Adams and students like him across the country. We’ve got your back.”

The brief claims, in part, that transgender students are protected under Title IX of the Education Amendments Act, which prohibits school districts from discriminating on the basis of sex or gender identity.

 

Carolyn Jones

Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 2:12 pm

Link copied.USC Rossier School focuses on hiring diverse faculty

The Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California has focused on hiring diverse faculty under the leadership of Pedro Noguera, the school’s dean.

Of the school’s 14 most recent faculty hires, 12 are people of color, according to diverseeducation.com. Noguera, who became dean in July 2020, told the website that the school needs faculty of color “who are speaking about the ways in which race and diversity are shaping our society.”

“Other universities cannot take the position that there are not enough people of color out there to hire. What are they doing to build the pipeline? We’re showing that with a concerted effort and institutional support, it can be done,” Noguera added.

Noguera said the school has been “assertive in our recruitment efforts” to add to a faculty body that has previously lacked in diversity. Most full-time faculty were white and male as of 2020, according to diverseeducation.com, with only 3% identifying as Black and 5% identifying as Latino or Hispanic.

Michael Burke

Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 12:12 pm

Link copied.California prison staff must be vaccinated by Jan. 12, federal judge orders

A federal judge has ordered California prison employees to be fully vaccinated against the coronavirus by Jan. 12, potentially reducing the number of Covid-19 cases among young and adult inmates. Inside the state’s four youth correctional institutions, a total of 255 youth and 278 staff members have contracted the virus since the onset of the pandemic, even as the number of incarcerated youth dwindles at the state level.

Plus, a federal report found that half of the outbreaks in California’s state prisons between May and July were traced back to employees.

The order comes after months of uncertainty as the California Correctional Peace Officers Association and Gov. Gavin Newsom requested a postponement of a vaccination mandate for prison staff.

As of Oct. 22, 62% of staff working at the state’s youth prison institutions were fully vaccinated. The remaining 38% were subject to weekly Covid-19 testing. For staff across all prisons in the state, the vaccination rate is currently 66%, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Betty Márquez Rosales

Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 11:24 am

Link copied.Thousands of Los Angeles Unified students miss vaccine deadline; 80% on track to comply

Though 80% of Los Angeles Unified’s students are on track to comply with the district’s Covid-19 vaccine mandate, as of Monday, about 44,000 missed the first deadline, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Students 12 and older were told to have either received at least one shot, obtain a medical exemption or receive an extension by Sunday. LA Unified’s announced deadline for the second dose is Dec. 19. However, there are no repercussions if students missed the first deadline.  Students could still wait until the first week of December to get their first dose and still have enough time to get the second shot and achieve maximum immunity by Jan. 10, the start of the next term, according to the LA Times.

The families that don’t comply with the vaccine mandate by Jan. 10 will have to enroll their children outside of LA Unified or transfer to the district’s independent study program, City of Angels.

Ali Tadayon

Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 11:16 am

Link copied.Some parents skeptical of San Francisco Unified recall effort

As three San Francisco Unified school board members face a recall election in February, some parents fear that it could mean a halt to the progress that’s been made to expand opportunities for marginalized students.

In a story published Monday, KQED spoke with Black and Latino parents who felt as though their voices have been drowned out in the recall election that has caught national attention. Recall advocates are frustrated with three of the district’s seven school board members since schools remained closed last school year despite private schools reopening. At the same time, the board took up other issues, including the renaming of schools and changing the admissions policy for Lowell High School, San Francisco’s rate my professor west valley college public high school. City and county officials also called on board member Alison Collins to resign over what they said were anti-Asian tweets from 2016.

Collins, Faauuga Moliga, and board President Gabriela Lopez face the recall.

District surveys found that families of color were more hesitant to return to schools in the spring than white families. KQED has reported on Asian families, especially Chinese families, feeling worried about sending their children back into classrooms.

KQED also spoke with parents who praised the board’s effort to enroll more Black and Latino students at Lowell High School, as well as the creation of the district’s first Samoan dual language immersion program since Pacific Islander Moliga has served on the school board. Tongan parent Anna Mahina said seeing a fellow Pacific Islander on the school board is empowering for both students and parents “because he knows the struggles straight from the heart.”

Collins, Moliga, and Lopez told KQED that their board actions have been in response to community needs.

“There’s no way that the recall is going to close the learning loss,” said teacher and parent Cynthia Meza. “If anything, it’s going to make it that much worse.”

Ali Tadayon

Monday, November 22, 2021, 11:23 am

Link copied.Thurmond wants more gender-neutral bathrooms in schools

California State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond would like to increase the number of gender-neutral bathrooms on California school campuses.

The superintendent announced last week that he will form a committee comprised of students, school staff and community organizations to make recommendations about how to best expand gender-neutral bathrooms in schools.

The announcement came days after a Chino Valley Unified District school board member proposed a resolution that would exclude transgender students from being able to use bathrooms and other facilities designated for the gender they identify with.

Thurmond issued a stern warning to Chino Valley Unified district officials stating that the proposed resolution violated state law. The proposal was defeated 3-2 at a school board meeting Thursday night after students, state lawmakers and faculty spoke against the measure. There were no speakers in support of the measure.

“We have to give our students all the support they need, including access to bathrooms they can use safely,” Thurmond said. “I have been inspired by the students who have advocated on this issue and want to give students the opportunity to be a part of finding the solutions.”

State Sen. Connie Leyva, who spoke against the resolution at the board meeting, has been asked to co-chair the committee, according to a news release from the California Department of Education. Her Senate district includes Chino Valley Unified.

The committee will be open to all California students, but a special effort will be made to engage students from the Chino Valley Unified School District, according to the release. For more information, contact safeschoolbathrooms@cde.ca.gov.

Diana Lambert

Monday, November 22, 2021, 10:33 am

Link copied.Two California schools win national honors for who pays for home warranty buyer or seller achievement

Two schools in California, one in Marin County and one in Shasta County, were honored as national “distinguished schools” for their students’ academic improvements and achievement.

Hall Middle School in Larkspur-Corte Madera School District in Marin and West Valley High School in Anderson Union High School District in Shasta County were honored under the National Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

“Congratulations to principals Toni Brown and Joshua Mason, as well as all of the educators, staff, administrators, parents, and students at these schools,” State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond said. “Not only were these two schools already named 2021 California Distinguished Schools, they’re also being recognized for their excellent work closing opportunity gaps among student groups and ensuring academic growth for all students.”

Carolyn Jones

Monday, November 22, 2021, 10:32 am

Link copied.Family of Black student sues school district, claiming teacher pulled him by hoodie

The family of a middle school student has sued the Brentwood Union School District in Contra Costa County, alleging that a white substitute teacher singled out the student because he is Black and pulled him by his sweatshirt hood, the Mercury News reported.

A judge rejected two motions to dismiss the case.

The incident allegedly occurred in 2019, when the student, who was 12 at the time, was standing with friends during a seventh-grade science class when the substitute grabbed him by his hood and dragged him back to his desk.

The substitute no longer works for the district. Attorneys for the district did not respond to the newspaper’s requests for comments, but in an October hearing said the incident did not meet the definition of racial discrimination, according to the report.

Carolyn Jones

Friday, November 19, 2021, 9:36 am

Link copied.Hayward Unified to close two schools because of declining enrollment

Hayward Unified will close two elementary schools because of declining enrollment, a problem facing school districts statewide.

The district has lost about 25% of its student population over the last 20 years and is facing a $14 million budget shortfall, according to the East Bay Times.

“We have too many schools for too few students, and that’s not going to change in a year,” said Superintendent Matt Wayne.

Hayward is the second Bay Area school district to make a decision in the past month to close schools. Cupertino Union School District recently announced it will close two schools as well.

Zaidee Stavely

Friday, November 19, 2021, 9:35 am

Link copied.Alameda County to escalate oversight over Oakland Unified

The Alameda County Office of Education plans to implement stricter oversight of Oakland Unified’s finances, over concerns that the board is not taking steps necessary to balance its budget.

As reported by Oaklandside, Alameda County Superintendent L.K. Monroe wrote in a letter to board members last week that she is concerned that the district has continued to maintain the same number of staff, despite declining enrollment. Monroe is worried the board won’t be able to make tens of millions of dollars in necessary cuts in next school year’s budget. She said the county will review the district’s finances and bring in the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team, a state agency, to examine the district’s teacher-hiring practices.

Monroe also threatened to withhold compensation from OUSD’s school board and superintendent.

The school board and district officials say it is too early to initiate an intervention and are calling on State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond to step in. Board members say they plan to develop the next budget and identify cuts for next school year before they have to approve it at the end of June.

“The District is on track to addressing its long-term fiscal challenges,” wrote OUSD’s chief governance officer, Joshua Daniels, in a letter to Thurmond.

Oakland Unified has a history of financial instability. Almost 20 years ago, a state administrator was appointed to govern the school district because it was financially insolvent. In 2009, the school board was able to take over again. But the district is still under oversight while paying off a $100 million loan to the state. A county trustee has veto power over any financial decisions district leaders make.

Zaidee Stavely

Thursday, November 18, 2021, 9:07 am

Link copied.L.A. Unified updates Covid-19 protocols ahead of spring semester

Starting Jan. 11, the start of the spring semester, students and faculty attending L.A. Unified schools will be tested weekly for the coronavirus only if they have not been vaccinated. By then, faculty and most students who are age 12 and older are expected to be fully vaccinated. The change is a departure from the current testing policy that requires all faculty, staff and students to test weekly for Covid-19, regardless of vaccination status.

The district has also updated its masking policy, allowing students to remove their masks outdoors if more than 85% of their school is fully vaccinated. This change indicates that most middle and high school students could be outdoors without a mask next year.

Booster shots and vaccines for students 5-11 years old are not required, though the district is offering them on a voluntary basis.

Betty Márquez Rosales

Thursday, November 18, 2021, 9:06 am

Link copied.Police to return to Pomona Unified 4 months after being removed

Police at Pomona Unified will return to campuses soon, four months after parents and students called for their removal. The City Council voted 5-1 this week to approve a service agreement that will cost the school district $195,000 per officer, according to the Daily Bulletin.

The school board also voted unanimously to return police to school campuses after a shooting in October near one of the district’s high schools.

Police officers stationed at schools will need to undergo training on restorative justice, de-escalation, diversity and more, per the agreement with the city.

“No evidence has been brought forward from the district or city that shows cops ensure safety,” said Jesus Sanchez, co-founder and executive director of Gente Rate my professor west valley college, a local organizing group that has actively supported the removal of police from school campuses.

Other school districts, such as Fremont Unified, have returned police officers to campuses shortly after removing them.

Betty Márquez Rosales

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 6:22 pm

Link copied.State superintendent warns Chino Valley Unified that proposed anti-transgender resolution is illegal

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond on Wednesday issued a stern warning to Chino Valley Unified over its proposed resolution that would exclude transgender students from being able to use bathrooms and other facilities designated for the gender they identify with.

The resolution was proposed by school board member James Na and prompted by a recent sexual assault in a high school bathroom. However, the resolution did not say where or when the sexual assault occurred, or if it even happened at a Chino Valley Unified school.

The proposal would restrict the use of restrooms, locker rooms, physical education classes, intramural sports and interscholastic athletic programs to students based on their “biological” gender. Schools would provide gender-neutral or single-use restrooms or changing areas as well as other alternatives in order “to address any student’s privacy concerns in using sex-segregated facilities.”

If passed at tomorrow’s Chino Valley Unified school board meeting, Thurmond said, the resolution would violate Section 221.5(F) of California’s Education Code, which states:

“A pupil shall be permitted to participate in sex-segregated school programs and activities, including athletic teams and competitions, and use facilities consistent with his or her gender identity, irrespective of the gender listed on the pupil’s records.”

Gender-neutral facilities may be offered by schools, but only as a matter of personal choice and not compulsion, Thurmond said.

Thurmond said the California Department of Education is “prepared to take action to defend trans and LGBTQ students should (the resolution) pass.”

Ali Tadayon

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 6:19 pm

Link copied.Newsom announces 18 initial projects in $6 billion broadband plan

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Wednesday announced 18 initial projects using the $6 billion that California allocated for broadband in the 2021-22 budget.

The initial project areas include tribal communities in San Diego and Riverside counties, as well as other areas such as Oakland’s flatland neighborhoods, San Bernardino County’s high desert, inland Orange County and others.

Although more than 90% of Californians have high-speed internet, hundreds of thousands of students are estimated to still be without reliable internet access at home, according to a recent study from the University of California and the California Emerging Technology Fund

A map and a list of the 18 project areas can be found here.

The initial project locations are based on known unserved and underserved areas, according to a news release from the Governor’s Office. The state will partner with existing providers as well as local governments and agencies to build and maintain new broadband lines.

The broadband plan directs $3.25 billion to build “middle-mile” broadband lines, which connect the greater highway of broadband service to the “last mile,” which are end users. The plan also sets aside $2 billion for last-mile lines both in rural and urban areas to connect consumers’ homes and businesses with local networks.

Ali Tadayon

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 3:14 pm

Link copied.Fifth batch of child tax credit payments hit bank accounts this week

The Treasury Department and IRS sent out the fifth batch of monthly child tax credit payments, disbursing more than $15 billion in payments to families that include about 61 million children, as The Hill reported. 

The government has sent out a total of about $77 billion in monthly payments since the program began in July. Families are eligible for payments of up to $300 per month for children under age 6, and up to $250 per month for children ages 6 to 17.

The monthly child tax credit payments emerged as a result of the coronavirus relief law President Joe Biden enacted earlier this year. The relief law also made the credit fully available to the lowest-income families. The child tax credit expansion in the relief law was only for 2021, meaning the payments will end next month unless Congress acts.

The White House and congressional Democrats are hoping to enact a social spending package that extends the expanded child tax credit for one more year, while making the credit fully available to the lowest-income families permanently. 

“The Child Tax Credit is giving families across America the flexibility to pay for household essentials, school supplies, and other child care needs,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in a statement, as The Hill cited. “This tax relief is making a meaningful difference in the lives of millions of children, and it’s crucial for Congress to extend it by passing President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda so families can continue to benefit.”

The expanded child tax credit has already lifted many children out of poverty, experts say. In California, for example, continuing the benefit has cutchild poverty from 20% to 13.7% and kept more than 600,000 kids above the poverty line, according to a recent study by the Urban Institute. 

Karen D'Souza

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 12:36 pm

Link copied.Charter schools continue to enroll fewer students with disabilities, report finds

Charter schools enroll significantly fewer students with disabilities than traditional public schools, although students with disabilities at charter schools are more likely to be in general education classrooms, according to a new report by the Center for Learner Equity.

The report is based on the 2020 figures from the federal Education Department’s  Civil Rights Data Collection. It shows that the percentage of students with disabilities in charter schools fell from 10.8% to 10.7% over the past four years, even while overall charter enrollment increased. In traditional public schools, students with disabilities made up 13.3% of the enrollment.

The report also looks at discipline, demographics and other details related to students with disabilities.

“The ability to provide clear data reports about how schools are enrolling and educating students with disabilities is invaluable because it equips everyone with the information needed to make sound and equitable decisions for the future,‘ said Lauren Morando Rhim, the Center for Learner Equity’s executive director.

Carolyn Jones

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 11:45 am

Link copied.Merced County middle school counselor wins national honor

Alma Lopez, a longtime counselor at Livingston Middle School in the Central Valley, is the first Californian to win National Counselor of the Year, the American School Counselor Association announced on Wednesday.

Lopez was recognized for her strong advocacy on behalf of her students, nearly all of whom are low-income and Latino. At her urging, the district more than doubled its counseling staff and expanded services to improve students’ academic and social-emotional development.

“The deep commitment she has to her community and her relentless focus on providing equitable outcomes for her students … were evident throughout her application and interview process,” said Valerie Hardy, a member of the independent judging panel that selects the School Counselor of the Year finalists and the winner of the award. “As a first-generation college attendee, Ms. Lopez serves as an inspiration for her students, her community and the profession.”

Carolyn Jones

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 11:13 am

Link copied.Legislative Analyst’s Office predicts a huge increase in funding for K-12 and community colleges

Benefiting from the fastest rise in state revenues in decades, the Legislative Analyst’s Office predicted Wednesday that K-12 schools and community colleges can expect $20 billion for new spending in 2022-23, a windfall that follows a record post-pandemic rate my professor west valley college of funding.

The amount through Proposition 98, the state formula that determines the minimum funding for K-14 schools from the general fund, is projected to be $102.7 billion, the first time that funding will exceed the $100 billion threshold, according to the LAO’s annual fiscal outlook. Community colleges usually receive about 11% of Proposition 98 funding, with nearly all of the remainder going to districts, county offices of education and charter schools.

Half of the additional $20 billion next year will be from revenues in 2020-21 and 2021-22 exceeding what the Legislature budgeted how to make paypal account without phone number the current year. That will carry over as one-time money next year. The other half will be ongoing funding from the rise in the Proposition 98 guarantee.

The LAO is also projecting a 5.35% cost of living increase next year, the highest rate of inflation in 15 years. Legislators usually factor that into increases in funding for the Local Control Funding Formula, the source of districts’ general funding, as well as funding for special education and other programs.

The LAO predicts that the K-12 average daily attendance this year will drop 3%, or 170,000 students, from pre-pandemic levels to 5.9 million students. It will drop an additional 170,000 students by 2025-26, but this will be offset by the addition of 230,000 children in transitional kindergarten, a new grade for 4-year-olds that the state is phasing in over several years.

John Fensterwald

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 9:55 am

Link copied.Congressional Budget Office cost estimate on Biden bill expected to land Friday

The Congressional Budget Office said its total cost estimate of President Joe Biden’s signature spending bill might not be ready until Friday, as Bloomberg reports, which may push a planned House vote on the legislation to the weekend or later.

The CBO analysis may reveal that the legislation falls short of fully paying for itself because of differences with the White House over how much revenue could be generated by stricter enforcement of tax laws by the Internal Revenue Service. 

House moderates delayed a vote on the legislation earlier this month,  as Bloomberg notes, because they wanted a full picture of the bill’s fiscal impact. In a statement, five moderate Democrats pledged to vote for the legislation no later than this week if the CBO estimates were consistent with White House estimates.

The CBO score could fall short of that benchmark. The White House estimate of a $2 trillion bill offset by $2.15 trillion in revenue is based on generating $400 billion from increased tax audits. CBO director Phillip Swagel has said that the CBO, after talking to Treasury officials, sees a lower revenue amount.

 

Karen D'Souza

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 9:29 am

Link copied.Strike by University of California part-time lecturers averted

A two-day strike rate my professor west valley college by lecturers at the University of California was averted Wednesday, with the union representing those lecturers saying it reached a tentative agreement with the university’s management.

UC-AFT, the union for UC’s part-time faculty, was planning a strike Wednesday and Thursday that would have caused mass class cancellations across the system’s nine campuses. But the union called off the strike after coming to a tentative contract deal that includes increased job protections, higher pay and four weeks of paid family leave. UC has about 6,000 lecturers.

“This is a landmark achievement. We are pleased with how far management has come towards our position. This victory is owed to the hard work of organizing that our members have done for over two and a half years,” UC-AFT President Mia McIver said.

Letitia Silar, the executive director for UC’s Systemwide Labor Relations, said in a statement Wednesday that UC is “proud of the dedication and commitment to harmonious labor relations both sides demonstrated to achieve a fair deal that honors our lecturers and prioritizes the University’s instructional mission.”

Michael Burke

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 9:28 am

Link copied.LAUSD offers prizes to persuade students to get Covid vaccine

With a vaccination deadline days away — and roughly 72% in compliance — the Los Angeles Board of Education authorized an estimated $5 million for prizes and treats as incentives, the L0s Angeles Times reported, including Amazon gift cards, tickets to “Hamilton” and food trucks on campus.

The incentive program is part of an effort to boost student vaccination rates by Nov. 21, the school district’s deadline for students 12 and older to receive the first of two doses. Students must be fully vaccinated by Jan. 10 or they will not be allowed on campus. Their options would be to pursue their education outside of Los Angeles Unified or transfer to City of Angels, a district independent study program, as the Los Angeles Times noted.

The incentives are mainly raffles, and all in compliance are eligible, including those who are vaccinated, have an approved medical exemption or have a rare authorized extension. Religious exemptions are not being granted.

Raffle prizes have also included gift cards to grocery stores; tickets to Disneyland, Magic Mountain and Universal Studios Hollywood, and graduation-night entertainment packages.

Karen D'Souza

Tuesday, November 16, 2021, 6:25 pm

Link copied.Calbright College partners with UC Irvine to study how students engage with the college

Calbright College’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously Tuesday to a $4.1 million, five-year partnership with the University of California, Irvine School of Education to study  how students interact with Calbright from application to completion.

UCI data scientists and Calbright staff will study how students navigate Calbright’s systems to see how they interact with the college. They’ll also use intervention techniques like nudges and success coaches to improve how students engage in the courses, professors and advisers.  The partnership plans to collect information about the students to help them get to the right career.

The college needs to figure out what adult learners need so it can help them, explained Calbright President Ajita Menon.

“The great lie is that we have the answers to ‘how to'”, successfully engage with adult learners, she said. “And the true fact is that we don’t for these communities of learners.”

Menon said the partnership positions Calbright to figure out the most effective solutions to engaging and encouraging adult learners to reach their career goals.

The goal is that the partnership will help Calbright reach an enrollment of 5,000 students by the end of 2023 with 1,200 of those students earning a certificate.

The college reports more than 500 active students. Since October, 2019, 68 certificates have been awarded.

Calbright  receives $15 million per year in state funding and received $100 million over 7 years starting in 2019 to launch a new college aimed at helping low-income working adults over 25 gain skills and credentials to advance in their jobs or to move to higher-paying jobs.

Ashley A. Smith

Tuesday, November 16, 2021, 10:28 am

Link copied.Task Force on Improving Black Student Achievement maps out direction at first meeting

California’s Task Force on Improving Black Student Achievement decided to launch five working groups to study the school-to-prison pipeline, teacher diversity, academic achievement, mental health and housing insecurity at its first meeting last week.

“We have a moment before us now to transform education in California, to close learning gaps that have grown during the pandemic and to address the socioeconomic needs of Black students and all students,” said State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond.

The task force, which will meet monthly, has 30 members from the fields of education, research, criminal justice reform and the nonprofit sector.

The working groups will make recommendations to state legislators that could potentially become legislation.

Diana Lambert

Tuesday, November 16, 2021, 9:53 am

Link copied.Racist graffiti targeting Sacramento assistant principal investigated as hate crime

Racist graffiti at Sacramento’s West Campus High School as well as rate my professor west valley college attacks targeted at assistant principal Elysse Versher are now being investigated by authorities as a hate crime.

Versher, a Black woman, was made aware on Nov. 5 of racist online comments about her, she told the Sacramento Bee, including use of the N-word. The comments appeared to be sparked by Versher’s enforcement of the school’s dress code, which requires masks to be worn on campus per district policy.

The following Monday, when she arrived at school she found a racist slur written five times directly across from her designated parking spot. Her family members have also received threats via email, she says.

On Wednesday, Versher was hospitalized after suffering stress-induced seizures from the torment, KXTV reported.

Versher told the Bee that racism and hatred she has endured stems from a “culture that has gone unchecked.”

“This had nothing to do with the dress code but an opportunity for students to see that a Black woman has the audacity to make non-Black students uncomfortable and inconvenienced by enforcing the dress code,” Versher told the Bee. “(It) has been around forever and has been enforced by my white colleagues without incident for quite a long time.”

Sacramento City Unified superintendent Jorge Aguilar released a video message Tuesday calling for a “reckoning on race at all levels” at the district.

“To make all of our schools pro-social learning environments that stand against racism and hatred, our efforts must impact every aspect of our organization, and flow from our boardroom to our classroom,” Aguilar said.

Ali Tadayon

Monday, November 15, 2021, 2:50 pm

Link copied.University of California lecturers plan to strike, alleging unfair labor practices

Lecturers at the University of California plan to strike this week over what they call unfair labor practices by the university.

UC-AFT, the union that represents more than 6,000 part-time lecturers across the system’s 10 undergraduate and one graduate campuses,  announced its plan to strike Wednesday and Thursday. The union has filed seven charges within the past two years with California’s Public Employment Relations Board and most recently has alleged that UC management has refused to bargain over paid family leave and time to allow for bonding with a new child.

UC’s central office of the president did not immediately return a request for comment Monday.

Mia McIver, the president of UC-AFT, said in a statement that UC management has issued “unlawful take-it-or-leave-it ultimatums that deprive us of our basic rights” and has negotiated in bad faith.

“It’s these kinds of unfair labor practices that demonstrate a lack of respect for teaching faculty and for the students who depend on us. UC lecturers have had enough, and that’s why we have called this strike to protect our collective bargaining rights,” McIver added.

Michael Burke

Monday, November 15, 2021, 10:38 am

Link copied.With 110 days off per year, Ontario-Montclair superintendent the highest paid in California

James Hammond, superintendent of Ontario-Montclair School District in San Bernardino County, is the highest-paid schools chief in the state, thanks to generous time-off policies and other perks that boost his pay to more than half a million dollars a year, according to the Press-Enterprise.

Hammond earned $562,000 in 2019, more than twice the average salary for superintendents in similar-size districts, according to the newspaper. His base pay was $320,000, but perks such as life insurance, retirement contributions, 85 days of sick time and 25 vacation days boosted his salary. He also receives lifetime health insurance for himself and his family, and 12 months’ severance pay for any termination aside from “major malfeasance,” according to the report.

School board President Elvia Rivas defended Hammond’s pay. “It is a fringe benefit which is designed to provide security in the event of sickness and to incentivize both wellness and longevity,” Rivas told the newspaper. “Students and school systems genuinely suffer from superintendent turnover. After finding the right leader for OMSD, the Board elected to structure Dr. Hammond’s compensation in a way that provided financial incentives for him to stay in OMSD and prevent the frequent turnover in the superintendent’s position that occurs in many urban school districts.”

Carolyn Jones

Monday, November 15, 2021, 10:29 am

Link copied.Jessica Holmes named to administrative position on state board

Jessica Holmes, who has represented the California Department of Finance’s positions on K-12 issues, will become the chief deputy executive director of the State Board of Education. Gov. Gavin Newsom announced the appointment last week.

Holmes has worked in the Department of Finance for eight years, serving most recently as assistant program budget manager. She has advised Govs. Newsom and Jerry Brown on a range of matters, including the Local Control Funding Formula, Proposition 98 funding, state education budgets, charter schools and workforce training. Before joining the department, she taught high school math and engineering in Northern California.

John Fensterwald

Monday, November 15, 2021, 10:19 am

Link copied.Religious groups protest Biden’s early childhood education plans

Religious groups such as the Catholic Church and the country’s largest Orthodox Jewish organization are trying to block the passage of President Joe Biden’s early childhood education proposal, saying they would be excluded from it because of the bill’s non-discrimination clause, according to the New York Times.

The religious groups say that they would not be able to receive federal funding for preschool and child care programs if they engage in discriminatory practices, such as hiring teachers based on their religion or sexual preference, according to the Times.

A significant number of families would be affected. A survey last year showed that more than half of families with young children rely on preschools or child care programs affiliated with religious groups, according to the Bipartisan Policy Center.

The early childhood education plan is part of Biden’s $1.85 trillion social policy bill, Build Back Better.

Carolyn Jones

Friday, November 12, 2021, 4:57 pm

Link copied.Biden nominates former teacher as head of special education

A former teacher and administrator known for her push to include students with disabilities in mainstream classrooms is in line to oversee the federal Office of Special Education, the U.S. Department of Education announced Friday.

President Joe Biden nominated Glenna Gallo, who leads the state of Washington’s special education division, to serve as assistant secretary for special education and rehabilitative services for the U.S. Department of Education. Gallo is also a former special education teacher with 25 years’ experience in the classroom and as an administrator. In Washington, Gallo worked to make classrooms more inclusive, reduce red tape for school districts, hire and train more aides and boost funding for students with disabilities.

“This nomination shows a deep commitment from this administration to ensure our nation’s students with disabilities receive the services and supports they need to reach their potential,” U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona said in a statement. “Glenna’s commitment to supporting the special education community will be instrumental in shaping and implementing the Department’s goals and strategies.”

 

Carolyn Jones

Friday, November 12, 2021, 9:35 am

Link copied.Student who was booed by adults in Clovis returns to school board

A student who was booed and heckled by adults at a Clovis Unified school board meeting after speaking in favor of a mask mandate returned to the school board to speak again this week.

This time, school board President Steven Fogg warned the audience not to repeat their actions from the previous meeting, according to the Fresno Bee.

“It’s inappropriate for you to be speaking while someone else is speaking, be it a member on the dais or a person giving public comments,” Fogg said. “In the unlikely event that there is a disruption, we do have officers that will escort you out. But I’m asking you not to do that. Let’s hear each other, and we can come to an understanding.”

The student received applause this time after speaking, even though many in the crowd disagreed with his comments.

Zaidee Stavely

Friday, November 12, 2021, 9:34 am

Link copied.Bomb threat prompts evacuation at USC

Three buildings at the University of Southern California were evacuated Thursday afternoon after a bomb threat, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The buildings were searched by police and declared safe shortly after.

Other threats came around the same time at New York University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It was not clear whether the threats were related.

 

Zaidee Stavely

Friday, November 12, 2021, 9:33 am

Link copied.Thousands of teachers still unvaccinated in Northern California

The number of teachers who are vaccinated varies widely among Northern California districts, ranging from 98% in San Rafael to about 77% in Manteca, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Some school districts, such as Los Angeles Unified, require all teachers to be vaccinated. However, the state of California allows teachers to remain unvaccinated, as long as they have weekly Covid-19 testing.

According to the Chronicle, about 23% of district workers in Manteca and 16% of district workers in Tracy are unvaccinated, compared with 3% in San Francisco Unified, 5% in Fremont Unified and Oakland Unified and 2% in San Rafael.

The governor’s office declined to explain to the paper why Newsom has not yet required adults in schools to get vaccinated.

 

Zaidee Stavely

Источник: https://edsource.org/news-updates

Faculty - Graduate Education

Graduate Education

Edward Aguiles (2004) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., West Virginia University; M.A., Kean University; M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Frank Alfano (2005) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., William Paterson University; M.A., New Jersey City University; Ed.D., Fordham University

Nina-Louise Alsbrook (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., St. John's University

Jennifer Ayala (2004) Assistant Professor, B.A., M.A., Montclair State University; M.Phil, Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center

John Baltz (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's University

Addie Boyd (2001) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., Montclair State University; Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Edward Brandt (2017) Adjunct Lecturer, B.S., Bloomsburg University; M.S., Delaware Valley College

Terrence Brennan (2012) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University

Kimberly A. Case (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., St. John Fisher College; M.Ed., University of Georgia; Ph.D., New York University

Michael Caulfield (2010) Adjunct Lecturer, J.D., Loyola University

Lorraine Cella (2011) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University

Francis Cherichello (2010) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Seton Hall University

Jung-ah Choi (2015) Assistant Professor, B.A., Seoul National University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Anna Cicirelli1 (1981) Associate Dean and Director of the Ed.D. Program, B.A., Saint Peter’s University; M.A., Rutgers University; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University

Joseph Cirillo (2008) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Saint Peter's University

James Clayton (2005) Assistant Professor, B.S., Saint Peter’s College; M.A., Montclair State University; Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University

Michael Corso (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Montclair State University

Sr. Elizabeth D'Alessio (2015) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., College of St. Elizabeth, M.A., St. Joseph Seminary; M.A., Georgian Court University; Ed.D., College of St. Elizabeth

Lauren Daniel (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.S., Seton Hall University

Dennis Degnan (2010) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Joseph Doria, Jr.1 (1969-1998, 2011)) Dean, B.A., Saint Peter's University; M.A., Boston College; Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University

Michael Finetti (2007) Assistant Professor, B.S. Rutgers University; M.A. Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Albert Galloway (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ph.D., Seton Hall University

Pedro Garrido (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., New Jersey City University

John Hammett (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Rutgers University

Henry F. Harty1 (1972) Professor Emeritus of Education, B.S., Saint Peter’s College; M.S., Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Rutgers University

Mark Hayes (2002) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., New Jersey City University; Ph.D., Fordham University

James P. Jacobson1(1967) Associate Professor, B.A., M.A., New Jersey City University; M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Tiffany Jacobson (2007) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., New Jersey City University

Ross Kasun (2011) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Melvin L. Klein (2009) Adjunct Lecturer, B.S. Ed., Slippery Rock State College; M.S. Ed., University of Pittsburgh

Patricia Kowalski (2001) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Robert Kravitz (2003) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

Martin P. LaGrow (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Martin Luther College; M.A., Saint Xavier University

Maria Del Carmen Lella (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's University

Steven Locascio (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Nicole Luongo (2007) Assistant Professor, B.S. Bucknell University, M.A. Seton Hall, Ed.D., Nova Southeastern

Thomas MacNamara (2014) Adjunct Professor, M.A., New Jersey City University

Thomas Matarazzo (2005) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., St. Francis University; M.A., New Jersey City University; Ed.D., California Coast University; Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Dennis McCafferty (2012) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

James McLaughlin (2007) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D. Seton Hall University

Ernest Mignoli (2002) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Saint Peter’s College

Joseph T. Pace (1992) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Saint Peter’s College; M.A., Fordham University

Joseph Papaj, S.J. (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M. Divinity, Woodstock College

Joslin Mar-Dai Pickens (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., M.A., Grambling State University; Ed.D., Louisiana State University

Michael Pierson (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ph.D., Capella University

John Powers (1997) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Saint Peter's College; M.A., New York University; M.A. New School University; M.A. New Jersey City University

Johanna Roberto (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

James M. Scanlon1(1981) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., lona College; M.A., Montclair State University; M.Ed., William Paterson University; Ph.D., Fordham University

James Schmitt (2012) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

Dennis Sevano(1993) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A. Montclair State University

Mark Silk (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., State University of New York of Albany

Mark Somerville (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, M.S.W., Columbia University

Albert Spiegel (2011) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Saint Peter's College

Brandi L. Stocker (2018) Adjunct Lecturer, B.A., Lindsey Wilson College; M.A., Ed.D., Eastern Kentucky University

David Turi (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ph.D., Seton Hall University

Steve Wizniewski (2013) Adjunct Lecturer, Ed.D., Seton Hall University

Robert Zywicki (2014) Adjunct Lecturer, M.A., Ed.D.,Saint Peter's College

Footnotes

1 Bene Merenti

Источник: https://catalogs.saintpeters.edu/graduate/graduateeducation/faculty/
rate my professor west valley college

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