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North central missouri college dental hygienist missouri


north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri

The Dental Hygienist role earned an average salary of $73458 in Missouri in 2021. Get a salary report by industry, company size, and skills. Find information for Dental Hygienist Schools in Missouri. University of Missouri, Kansas City (UMKC) North Central Missouri College (NCMC). degree programs (Oral & Craniofacial Sciences and Dental Hygiene Education) as well as the advanced dental programs all have strong research components. The.

North central missouri college dental hygienist missouri -

Dental Staff

Jeffry Gardner, D.D.S.

Dr. Gardner began his childhood in Clarksdale, Missouri and later graduated from Maysville High School. He continued his education at the University of Missouri, Columbia and earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Biochemistry. Immediately following Mizzou, he entered dental school at the University Of Missouri Kansas City School Of Dentistry where he received his Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree in 1997.

After spending three years in Indianola, Iowa with a small group practice, Dr. Gardner and his wife, Darchelle chose Maryville as the place they wanted call home. Today they are blessed with two children, Alex and Katie. Alex completed his undergrad at Mizzou in May of 2021, and is starting dental school at UMKC in the fall. Katie is attending Oklahoma State University.

Dr. Gardner is a member of the American Dental Association, Missouri Dental Association and Northwest Missouri Dental Society where he has served as President and Treasurer. He is an active member of the Maryville Host Lions Club, the Mozingo Advisory Board and Countryside Christian Church.

In his time away from the office, Dr. Gardner enjoys spending time with his family. He is an avid outdoorsman and enjoys hunting, fishing and working on his farm to improve wildlife habitat.


Daedra Powers, Registered Dental Hygienist 

Hi! I'm Daedra (pronounced Day-dra) and I have been a hygienist for Dr. Gardner since 2012. I always knew I wanted to be involved in a dental office as I had loved going to the dentist as a kid. I graduated with a degree in dental hygiene from NCMC. You will find me behind the scenes cleaning teeth and making people smile. 

When I'm not at work, you can find me running around St. Joseph with my husband, Brad, and our little boy, Carter. We enjoy cheering on the Chiefs and Royals, being outside, traveling and watching Carter play t-ball. 


Hanna Strough, Certified Dental Assistant, Expanded Functions

Hanna

Hi, I’m Hanna. I was born and raised in Skidmore, MO. I joined Dr. Gardner’s team in 2011 and instantly fell in love with Dental Assisting. I never dreamed I would enjoy educating patients on their teeth, but I love it! I am a Certified Dental Assistant with expanded functions in fixed and removable prosthetics. 

When I am not at the office you can usually find me with my two beautiful daughters Taylor and Chloe. We love to spend our time outdoors being active. I am excited to see Gardner Family Dentistry expand and grow with the community. Hope to see you all in the near future! 


Danielle Guthrie, Registered Dental Hygienist

Danielle

Hi! I'm Danielle, one of Dr. Gardner's Registered Dental Hygienists! I grew up in Bedford, IA and graduated from Bedford High School. After high school, I attended Des Moines Area Community College where I took my general education courses to get into the hygiene program. During my waiting period of getting into the program, I was a dental assistant for 2 years. I graduated in May of 2016 and I practiced in Iowa until starting with Dr. Gardner in October 2016.

I had the pleasure of marrying my husband Jason, in March 2017 and we welcomed our daughter in March 2018 named Blaire. We are expecting a baby boy in October of 2021. When I'm not working, I enjoy hanging out with my husband and chasing around my little girl! Gardner Family Dentistry is a great place to work and we have a great team of dental professionals. I hope to meet you soon and be able to help with your overall oral health.


Darchelle Gardner, Office Manager

Hi! My name is Darchelle. I wear many hats in the office including Office Manager, Dr. Gardner's wife, and "Office Mom". After 22 years as a cardiac nurse, I made the decision to join Jeff in the office. I am usually up in front answering phones and I have come to enjoy the title of "Director of First Impressons"! After 22 years of direct patient care, I do enjoy assisting in the back as well.

Darc

In my spare time, I enjoy visiting Alex at Mizzou and cooking his favorite meals when he comes home. Katie and I like to try our hand at new recipes, which we test out on the office staff. Our family enjoys spending time at our farm with our two dogs: Jag, the Brittany and Willow, who is a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. We also enjoy traveling as a family and visiting new destinations.

Jeff and I feel passionately about the organizations that we support including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Countryside Christian Church, Missouri Mission of Mercy (MOMOM) and the Belize Mission Project. Each year we make it a point to close the office to attend MOMOM and donate our time to provide free dental care to those in need. In October of 2018, Katie and I were blessed to be able to go on the Belize Mission Project where we were part of a team that provided dental services including restorations, extractions, and preventative care to the under-served people of Belize.

I enjoy working in the office, visiting with people, and being witness to Dr. Gardner and the staff provide exceptional patient care. Please make sure to say hi when you're in the office!


Brooke Ramsey, Certified Dental Assistant, Expanded Functions

Hi! My name is Brooke. I am one of the Dental Assistants here at Gardner Family Dentistry. I recently completed my dental assisting certification and have my expanded functions in removable prosthetics and fixed prosthetics! I have a true passion for dentistry; I enjoy educating patients about their teeth and I enjoy helping patients love their smile! It is rewarding to be able to build relationships with patients while helping them achieve their perfect smile! When I am not assisting Dr. Gardner you can find me at the front desk working to help you make the most of your insurance benefits, coordinating patient care, and getting to know each patient. 

I grew up in Fairfax, MO and moved to Maryville in 2008. I married my amazing husband, Cory, in June of 2016 and welcomed our son, Kellyn in June of 2019! Our little family just recently moved back to my husband's stomping grounds in good ol' Rea, MO! Outside of work, I enjoy spending time with friends and family. I also enjoy traveling and spending time outdoors, mainly playing sports or cheering on the Royals and Chiefs! I look forward to meeting you soon!


Abby Hoscheid, Dental Assistant 

absHi! My name is Abby. I was raised in a small town called Cherry, in Northern Illinois. After high school, I attended IVCC to complete my Associate's Degree and Expanded Functions Dental Assistant Certification. I now reside in Bedford, IA with my boyfriend, Jake. When I have some free time, I enjoy watching movies or taking trips with Jake on his motorcycle. 

Since middle school I knew I wanted to be a part of the dental world and help people get the smile they deserve. 

I joined Dr. Gardner's team in February of 2021. I enjoy meeting each and every one of you that makes this community so great! I hope to see you soon! 


Courtney Blackford,  Front Office Rockstar

Court

Hi! My name is Courtney. I was born and raised here in Maryville, so I bleed green! After high school I attended Highland Community College where I obtained my Associate of Arts Degree. I am excited to be working up front at Gardner Family Dentistry. I look forward to getting to know each patient and helping in anyway that I can!

When I am not at work, you can find me hanging out with my family. I have been married to my husband, Tim, for 20 years this September. We have 2 sons, Andrew and Aydan. Andrew graduated high school in May and is attending North Central Missouri College this fall. Aydan will be a sophomore at North Nodaway High School this year.

In my free time I enjoy reading, walking, scrapbooking, watching my boys play sports, as well as spending time with family and friends. 


Jordan Jones,  Registered Dental Hygienist 

Jordan

Hi all! My name is Jordan. I am a Registered Dental Hygienist here at Gardner Family Dental. I grew up in Sioux Falls, SD before attending the University of Nebraska. Go Big Red! From there I received my bachelors in Dental Hygiene from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. 

I moved to Maryville in 2019, and have come to learn what an amazing community I serve! The favorite part of my job is connecting with my patients, and fostering relationships. I cannot wait to meet you at your next appointment! 

When I’m not at working I am busy planning my upcoming wedding to my amazing fiancé Ryan, attending any and all Bearcat sporting events, golfing or baking!

Источник: https://www.maryvillesmiles.com/staff

2022 Most Affordable Colleges in Missouri

College in Kansas City on a Budget

The Paris of the Plains is the most expensive city on our list, but only just. According to Sperling’s Best Places, the overall cost of living is often below the national average. Housing costs are usually the cheapest category in the list; utilities costs are typically the priciest. The city has more miles of freeways per capita than any other 1 million+ metro area, so many students who don’t live right near campus end up driving or ridesharing. UMKC students are a walk away from the Plaza and 10 minutes from downtown.

Where to Go for Help in Kansas City

There are number of organizations committed to getting low-income and mid-income Kansas City residents to college. Here are a few:

  • The Greater Kansas City Community Foundation (GKCCF) has an extensive list of Kansas City college scholarship opportunities, including undergraduate and graduate opportunities. You can use the online scholarship portal to fill out the qualification questionnaire and general application.
  • Another place to look for scholarships is the Truman Heartland Community Foundation (THCF). 200+ donors have created funds to support students in a variety of educational disciplines.
  • Urban Ranger Corps is designed to help urban high school men graduate from high school, develop personal career paths and thrive as citizens. During the school year, rangers get assistance with career preparation and job applications and work with the community. During the summer, rangers participate in an eight-week program that includes paid work experience, community service and leadership development workshops.
  • Della Lamb Community Services provides low-income families with early education, child care, youth services, adult education (e.g. GED, ESL, etc.), transportation, emergency social services and more.

Looking for specific social services? United Way of Greater Kansas City has a roll call of city-funded programs, divided by category (e.g. education, income, etc.). The website City of Kansas City, MO also has useful information on utilities, housing, transport and more.

College in St. Louis on a Budget

St Louis’s overall cost of living is very similar to Kansas City’s (good news for UMSL students who have to live off campus). The Metro is fairly efficient, which expands your choices of neighborhoods, but watch out for high-crime areas. Also, within the city, renters are not responsible for water, sewer, or trash. If you don’t love the Gateway Arch, you can try the free activities in Forest Park (larger than Central Park) and entertainment options in the Delmar Loop.

Where to Go for Help in St. Louis

St. Louis can be a tough town for folks growing up in low-income areas. If you need a bit of assistance with getting to college, here are a few organizations to explore:

Looking for specific social services? United Way of Greater St. Louis has a long list of member agencies, which you can sort by category. The City of St. Louis also has useful information on utilities, housing, transport and more.

College in Springfield on a Budget

Springfield is a midsize city for those with a midsize budget. The overall cost of living is about the same as St. Louis, and all categories (e.g. utilities, housing, transportation, etc.) are below the national average. A car may not be necessary. MSU’s free shuttle bus—the Bear Line—can take students downtown and to off campus grocery stores. Others use the city bus. The downtown district has undergone a makeover, with artsy shops and coffee houses, and there are plenty of opportunities to escape to nature.

Where to Go for Help in Springfield

When it comes to preparing for college in Springfield, it pays to think local. Many city-based organizations are happy to help residents (both high school graduates and adult learners) achieve their dreams of higher education.

  • The Community Foundation of the Ozarks (CFO) allows you to search for local college scholarships in an assortment of geographic areas. You’ll need to look at individual scholarship pages for instructions on how to apply.
  • Speaking of scholarships, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Springfield awards more than $85,000 annually in college scholarships to former Club members and staff pursuing a degree in higher education. It also runs a number of career development, education support and mentorship programs for high school youth.
  • Ozarks Technical Community College operates an Adult Education and Literacy (AEL) program to help adult learners with ESL, preparation for Missouri HSE exams, college admission and career training. Learning centers are scattered throughout multiple counties.
  • Ozarks Literacy Council provides literacy programs for children and families and individualized one-on-one tutoring for adults.

Looking for specific social services? United Way of the Ozarks serves 14 counties in Southern Missouri and has a list of partner agencies. The City of Springfield, MO also has useful information on utilities, housing, transport and more.

Источник: https://www.collegeaffordabilityguide.org/schools/missouri/

Missouri Southern State University

Missouri Southern State University (Missouri Southern, MSSU, or MoSo) is a public university in Joplin, Missouri, United States. It was established in 1937 as Joplin Junior College.

History[edit]

Missouri Southern State University was founded in 1937 as Joplin Junior College.[2] At its conception, Joplin Junior College had 114 students and only 9 faculty members. In 1964, residents of Jasper County, Missouri approved a $2.5 million bond issue to begin construction on a new campus, where the university is currently located. The new campus opened in the fall of 1967 with 2,399 students and 95 faculty members. In 1977, the school was renamed Missouri Southern State College and officially became a state-assisted four-year college and part of the state of Missouri's higher education system. In 2003, the Missouri General Assembly authorized the renaming of the college to Missouri Southern State University - Joplin; in 2005 the university dropped Joplin from its name.

In 1967, the campus was home to six buildings. The Taylor Performing Arts center was completed in 1973 and the Richard M. Webster Communications and Social Science Building opened in August 1992.

Missouri Southern recently finished construction on a health sciences building. The building, which had its groundbreaking on May 19, 2008, was built with money secured by MOHELA and distributed to MSSU by the state of Missouri. The Missouri General Assembly had entertained the addition of the Joplin Regional Center, owned by the Missouri Department of Mental Health, to Missouri Southern's campus in spring of 2009.[3]

The school is about 30 blocks northeast of the worst of the devastation of the 2011 Joplin tornado which destroyed much of southern Joplin on May 22, 2011—one day after the school's graduation. Joplin High School had just completed its school graduation on the campus shortly before the tornado. The Leggett and Platt Athletic Center was used as an emergency shelter for victims. Billingsly Student Center was the headquarters for volunteer efforts run by Americorps St. Louis and was the coordination area for identifying victims and survivors. On May 29, 2011, Barack Obama, who was inspecting the damage, spoke at the Taylor Performing Arts Center.[4][5]

[edit]

Missouri Southern has had seven presidents that have served since its beginning in 1967.[6]

TitleNameDates
PresidentLeon C. Billingsly1967–1978
PresidentDr. Donald C. Darnton1979–1982
PresidentDr. Julio León1982–2007
Interim PresidentDr. Teri Agee2007–2008
PresidentDr. Bruce Speck2008–2013
PresidentDr. Alan Marble2013–2020
PresidentDr. Dean Van Galen2020–present

Campus[edit]

Barack Obama at Missouri Southern on May 29, 2011, during a memorial service for victims of the 2011 tornado.

The campus of Missouri Southern is cross divided by Duquesne Road (running north–south) and Newman Road (running east–west). The main portion of the campus is located west of Duquesne, though the football stadium and softball fields are on the east side of Duquesne.

Academic buildings[edit]

Spiva Library (opened in 1967) was the first building built on the current campus following the properties purchase for use by what was then Missouri Southern College. The library is named after prominent Joplin businessman George A. Spiva (1904–1967),[7] who was a major donor and supporter of the school. Expansions to the library in 1972–1973 and 1999–2000 have tripled the size of the original structure. Prior to 1987, the social sciences department utilized some areas of the building for classrooms and offices.[8]

Reynolds Hall (opened in 1967) is named after one of the original members of the school's board of regents, Lauren R. Reynolds (1916–1968). He served on the board from 1965 until his death.[9] This building houses the biology and environmental health, chemical and physical sciences, and mathematics departments. On Dec. 5, 2014, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced that he would request more than $5.2 million in funding from the state legislature for renovations to the building. The funds will allow MSSU to renovate labs, classrooms and electrical systems.[10][11]

Hearnes Hall (opened in 1967) is named after former Missouri Governor Warren E. Hearnes (1923–2009) who was governor at the time of the construction of the campus and signed the law which made Missouri Southern a state institution. Hearnes Hall is the university's administration building, but was previously home to English department (now located in Kuhn Hall) and the communications department (now located in Webster Hall). Hearnes Hall has never been expanded, but underwent major renovations ending in 2012.

Fine Arts Building (opened in 1967) is the home to the music and art departments. It is also home of the Spiva Gallery and is connected to both the Taylor Performing Arts Center and the Bud Walton Black Box Theatre.

Leon C. Billingsly Student Center (opened in 1969) is named after the first president of what was then Missouri Southern College, Leon C. Billingsly (1925–1978). Billingsly served in that capacity from 1964 until his death and supervised the construction of the original buildings on the campus.[12] The building is home to the cafeteria, book store and Keystone and Connor ballrooms. Formerly known as the College Union, it was renamed for Billingsly in 1980, two years after his death. It has been expanded multiple times, the latest in 2009 when the George S. Beimdiek Recreation Center and Willcoxon Student Health Center were added onto it.[6]

Kuhn Hall (opened in 1969) is named after Dr. John Raymond Kuhn (1902–1986) a Joplin area doctor who encouraged more practical application medical training at the college. It was originally home to the nursing (now in the Health Sciences Building) and computer science departments (now in Plaster Hall). Today it is home to the English department.[citation needed] The neighboring Kuhn Annex, which was built in 1963 and also houses part of the English department, was originally a model home for a proposed housing subdivision planned by Rolla Stephens on the former Mission Hills estate. When Stephens learned of the search for a new campus for the college, he worked with George A. Spiva and Morgan Hillhouse so the land could instead be used for that purpose.[12]

Ummel Technology Center (opened in 1971) is named for Elvin Byron Ummel (1922–1993), who served on the school's board of trustees from the 1964 to 1986, when that body was abolished. The center now houses some of the programs falling under the biology and environmental health department in the School of Arts and Sciences, including the cadaver lab.[13] It underwent a major renovation in 2011 and 2012 and had previously been used for technology and engineering courses, including automotive technology and drafting.

Thomas E. Taylor Performing Arts Center (opened in 1974) is named for former Missouri Southern board of regents member (1965–1974) and board of trustees member (1964–1975) Thomas E. Taylor (1902–1975). The 2,000-seat performing arts center was built on a $1 million bond and is home to the theatre department.

Taylor Hall (opened in 1977) also known as the Gene Taylor Education Center is named for U.S. Congressman Gene Taylor (1928–1998). Taylor had served on the board of trustees from 1964 to 1972 and was the president of that board at the time the current campus opened in 1967.[12] Taylor Hall has been home to the school of education and psychology since its construction, though it has been enlarged since that time.

Mills Anderson Justice Center (opened in 1978) is named for former Missouri Southern board of regents (1965–1977) member Mills Anderson (1914–1999). It is home of the college's criminal justice department and law enforcement academy. It was greatly expanded in 1996.[12]

Plaster Hall (opened in 1980) is also known as the Robert W. Plaster Free Enterprise Center and is named for Robert W. Plaster (1930–2008), a former Joplin Junior College student and the founder of Empire Gas.[14] Formerly known as Matthews Hall and named after Norval M. Matthews (1895–1977), an original member of the school's board of regents from 1965 until his death, the building and the school of business, which has resided in it since its construction, were renamed after Plaster in 2006 when he made the largest donation in the college's history. Prior to this building's construction, the school of business had been located in the former Mission Hills mansion, today the Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center, from 1969 to 1980.[15]

Webster Hall (opened in 1992) is named for Richard M. Webster (1922–1990), a former speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives and a longtime state senator representing the area from 1962 until his death. The building cost $7.5 million at the time of its construction and is home to the social sciences, communications, foreign languages, and international studies departments. The W. Robert Corley Auditorium is located inside Webster Hall. It was named after William Robert Corley, a local businessman following a significant donation by him in 2009.

Bud Walton Black Box Theatre (opened in 1999) is named for Bud Walton, brother of Walmart founder Sam Walton and a financial donor for the construction of the facility. The Walton Black Box Theatre was built as a replacement for the college's previous Barn Theatre, which was destroyed by fire in 1990.[16]

Julio S. Leon Health Sciences Center (opened in 2010) is named for Dr. Julio Leon, who served as the president of the University from 1982 to 2007. It houses programs in nursing, dental hygiene, kinesiology, medical technology, psychology, radiologic technology and respiratory therapy.

Jeremiah "Jay" Nixon Hall (opened in 2019) is named for the 55th governor of Missouri Jeremiah "Jay" Nixon, who served from 2009 to 2017. Governor Nixon campaigned and received $5.2 million that was used to construct the hall and renovate the nearby Reynolds hall. Nixon hall is used for mathematics and other STEM fields. The building is three stories and houses staff offices, study rooms, and many classrooms. It is connected to Reynolds hall via a sky bridge on the second floor and is the newest building on campus.

Alumni Center[edit]

The Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center (opened in 2011) is named after Ralph L. Gray, a major donor for the building's restoration. The building, also known as the Mission Hills mansion, is the oldest structure on campus, built in 1926 as the private home of Lucius Buchanan. When the property was purchased for use as the university's campus in 1964, the mansion was originally used by then President Leon Billingsly for his office space. It then served as the home of the school of business from 1969 to 1980 and the social sciences department between 1987 and 1992. It sat empty from 1992 until 2006, when the process of restoring and renovating it for its current use started.[15]

Former buildings[edit]

Joplin Junior College at 4th Street & Byers Avenue (1938–1959) was the first permanent home of the college (the year previously the college's courses were taught in the Joplin High School building at 8th Street and Wall Avenue). The building, which was originally constructed in 1897 and then nearly doubled in size in 1907, had previously served as the home of Joplin High School and later as North Junior High School before being renovated for use by the fledgling college. Joplin Junior College moved out of the building in 1959, moving to the now unused former home of Joplin High School at 8th Street and Wall Avenue. The 4th Street & Byers Avenue building was razed in 1961.

Blaine Hall (1946–1959) was named after Harry E. Blaine, the dean of Joplin Junior College from 1937 to 1947. It is not to be confused with the dormitory on the current campus that is also named after Blaine. It was located in a formerly private residence that was near Joplin Junior College's first home at the corner of 4th Street and Byers Avenue. Blaine Hall acted as a student union and had a cafeteria and a student lounge. The building was abandoned by the college when it moved to its second home at 8th Street and Wall Avenue in 1959. It was eventually torn down.

Joplin Junior College/Jasper County Community College at 8th Street and Wall Avenue (1959–1967) was the second permanent home of what was then Joplin Junior College (though the first year the college had offered courses in 1937 those classes had also taken place in this building). During the time the college was in this building it was renamed Jasper County Community College. This structure was built in 1917 as the home of Joplin High School, replacing the previous building at 4th Street & Byers Avenue, which was also home to Joplin Junior College from 1938 to 1959. The college was in this building from 1959 until 1967, when it moved to its current campus. The building became Memorial High School from 1968 to 1985 and then Memorial Middle School. The nearly 100-year-old structure still stands and now serves as the Joplin public school district's Memorial Education Center.

The Barn Theatre (1967–1990) was the first performing arts space on the current university campus. It had originally served as a dairy barn for the Mission Hills farm. With a limited budget and no theatre space included among the original academic buildings planned for the campus, theatre department staff transformed the former dairy barn into the campus's first theatre. It remained popular and in use even after the construction of the much larger and modern Thomas E. Taylor Center for Performing Arts in 1973. The Barn Theatre was destroyed by a fire on Thanksgiving Day in 1990.[16]

The Learning Center (1967–2005) was renovated out of the shell of the former garage of the Mission Hills mansion. The original space had been expanded and at previous times housed the school of business and the department of social sciences. In 1992 it was remodeled for use for student tutoring and other similar needs. It was demolished in 2005 to make way for the construction of the George S. Beimdiek Recreation Center and Willcoxon Student Health Center and for the renovation of the Mission Hills mansion into the Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center, which takes up some of the footprint previously occupied by the Learning Center.

The Guest House (1967–2005) had served as a guest house for the Mission Hills mansion when it was a private residence. But following the establishment of the university on its current campus, the school's newspaper, The Chart, had its offices in this building, though they were later moved to Hearnes Hall and are currently located inside Webster Hall. The building served various other purposes as office space and eventually storage for the university before being razed in 2005.

Campus life[edit]

[edit]

The campus has two traditional dormitories, eight apartment-style housing complexes, and two suite-style dormitories. The dormitories are McCormick and Blaine Halls; the apartments are Gockel, Stegge, Dishman, Dryer, Stone, Headlee, Maupin, and Mitchell Halls; and the suite-style dorms are located in East Hall and The Quads. Also a part of the residence area of campus is the Mayes Student Life Center, which is home to the university's cafeteria, weight room, residence computer labs, and commons area. These dorms house about 600 students. The Quads, opened fall of 2015, is a three-story complex that features 51 student apartments the vast majority of which will be four bedrooms.

[edit]

Blaine Hall (opened in 1971) is named after Harry E. Blaine (1873–1955), who served as the first dean of what was then Joplin Junior College from its opening in 1937 until his retirement in 1947. This facility is all male and is arranged as a traditional style dormitory, housing 174 students, mostly freshmen.[17]

McCormick Hall (opened in 1971) is named after Martha McCormick (1902–1987), who taught mathematics from 1939 to 1973 at what was first Joplin Junior College and then later Missouri Southern State College. This facility houses 90 students and was one of the first two dormitories built on the campus, housing only female students since it opened.[17]

Dishman Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Darral Dishman (1936–1984), who started as an art professor at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1964. He later became head of the department and remained at the college until his death. Dishman Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Dryer Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Dr. Lloyd L. Dryer (1911–1984), who was a professor of psychology at what was first Joplin Junior College and then Missouri Southern State College. Dryer Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Gockel Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Harry Gockel (1902–1984), who started at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1939, just two years after its founding, and retired from the college in 1972. He was a professor of history, economics and geography. A bequest in his and his late wife's, Berniece Gockel (1911–1995), will provided the seed money for the university's annual Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium. Gockel Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Headlee Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Cleetus Juanita Headlee (1911–2000), who from 1946 to 1976 was an English professor at what was then Joplin Junior College and later Missouri Southern State College. Between 1948 and 1967 she was the advisor for the college newspaper, The Chart. Headlee Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Stegge Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Dudley Frank Stegge (1923–1992), who started at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1951 as a track and football coach. Stegge later served as dean of students from 1967 to 1969 and was the director of the Student Union, now Billingsly Student Center, from 1969 until his retirement in 1980. Stegge Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Maupin Hall (opened in 1987) is named after Dr. Jim Maupin (1923–2006), who served as dean of technology at what was then Missouri Southern State College, retiring in 1992. He started his career with the college in 1954 teaching biology. Maupin Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Mitchell Hall (opened in 1987) is named after Grace Clayton Mitchell (1920–2006), a longtime English professor at what was first Joplin Junior College and later Missouri Southern State College. She first taught at the school in 1946 and after taking a break from teaching returned in 1958 and remained until retiring in 1981. Mitchell Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Stone Hall (opened in 1991) is named after Dorothy Aleta Stone (1909–2001), who was a professor of business administration at what was first Joplin Junior College and then Missouri Southern State College from 1939 to 1975. Stone Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Mayes Student Life Center (opened in 1993) is named for Dianne S. Mayes (1936–1995), a longtime supporter of the university. The facility includes a computer lab, laundry facilities, vending machines, aerobic workout room, weight room and a large-screen television lounge for all students, faculty and staff.[6] A major addition, including a cafeteria, was added in 1999.[17]

East Hall (opened in 2002) is the largest of the university's residential buildings. It houses 202 students in suite style dormitories.[17] East hall is named because it is the easternmost residential building on campus.

The Quads (opened in 2015) is the newest of the university's dormitories. The name "Quads" come from the 4 bedroom style in which each "room" is built. There is a living area, kitchen, 4 bedrooms, each with their own bathroom, and a laundry room in each "Quad." The Quads house 200 students.

Greek life[edit]

Currently, MSSU is home to three fraternities, two sororities and many honorary and professional societies. MSSU has the Pi-Eta chapter of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, and the Delta Pi chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity. Phi Delta Theta began operating on campus in 2020. Missouri Southern has the Zeta Alpha chapter of the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority and the Eta Upsilon chapter of the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. Missouri Southern does not have any brick-and-mortar or traditional greek housing.

Student organizations, groups and activities[edit]

There are over 70 student organizations. These organizations range from ethnic to political, religious to special interest.

MSSU Student Senate (SS) is the official voice of the student body at Missouri Southern State University. SS strives to find solutions to campus issues by making policy recommendations to the administration. SS is a forum for problems, concerns, questions, suggestions, and ideas as they relate to student life on campus. SS serves as the governing body for all students and more than 70 student organizations on campus. SS was established in MSSU's early years and has been active on campus ever since. SS is entirely funded by student fees, receiving a budget of $20,000 each academic year. Meetings are held once a week on Wednesdays and are open to the public.

The Campus Activities Board (CAB) orchestrates activities and programs in the Billingsly Student Union and around campus. CAB is a student-run programming board dedicated to enhancing the college experience at Missouri Southern. By effectively utilizing the Student Involvement Fee, CAB aims to provide educational, entertaining, cultural, and leisure opportunities to complement the students' academic experience.

Intramural sports are also available on campus. The University also supports students competing in collegiate mock trial as governed by the American Mock Trial Association.

Missouri Southern currently has many student organizations including Student Senate, Campus Activities Board, 34 Departmental organizations, 12 honors organizations, 9 religious organizations, and 19 special interest organizations. The university also has a school newspaper, The Chart, and an alumni magazine, Crossroads.[18]

Intramurals[edit]

Missouri Southern has a sophisticated intramural sports program. Sports included are flag football, softball, whiffleball, volleyball, 5-on-5 basketball, 3-on-3 basketball, mini-golf, soccer, hold-'em poker, bowling, table tennis, dodgeball and billiards.

Athletics[edit]

Main article: Missouri Southern Lions

Missouri Southern's mascot is the Lions. The Lions play in NCAA Division II as a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association. MSSU fields seven men's and seven women's sports.[19] The program has had over 250 All-Americans in its history after starting off as a member of the NAIA and in 1989 joining the NCAA. The program was a member of the Central States Intercollegiate Conference while a member of the NAIA.

Notable alumni[edit]

  • Allen Barbre, offensive lineman for the Green Bay Packers, Seattle Seahawks, Miami Dolphins and Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League.
  • Bob Beatty, American football coach.
  • Lonny Chapman, actor.
  • Richard Jordan, former National Football League linebacker for the Detroit Lions.
  • Terry Joyce, punter for the National Football League's St. Louis Cardinals in the 1970s.
  • Janet L. Kavandi, NASAastronaut.
  • Roderick C. Meredith, evangelist for Radio Church of God who also formed the Global Church of God.
  • Gary Nodler, Missouri State Senator.
  • J. Eddie Peck, television and film actor. His best-known roles include Cole Howard on The Young and the Restless and Jake Martin on All My Children.
  • Ron Richard, Speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives.
  • Rod Smith, wide receiver for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League, 1995–2008.
  • Jeff Speakman, Martial artist and actor.
  • James Thrash, wide receiver for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League.
  • Dennis Weaver, actor. He is best known for his television roles in Gunsmoke and McCloud as well as the early Steven Spielberg thriller Duel.
  • Brandon Williams, defensive tackle for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League.

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_Southern_State_University

North Central Missouri College

North Central Missouri College
Trenton, MO
680 Undergraduate Students
$6,510 Tuition
Community College, Town

02. Location

03. College Information

NJCAA
Community College, Town
680
Not Listed
$5,580
$6,510

04. Athletics

Baseball
Basketball
Golf
ESports
Basketball
Golf
Softball
ESports
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General Admissions Info

Not Listed
680
1,066

Application

Student Primary Residence

Missouri, Virgin Islands, Kansas, Texas, Iowa

Financial Aid / Cost

*Average cost per year after financial aid, grants, and scholarship aid as reported by the college

Scholarships

$4,602
54%
$1,846
34%

Academic

20
-Liberal Arts and Humanities
-Nursing
-Licensed Practical Nurse Training (LPN)
-Agricultural Business
-Education
-Data Processing
-Dental Hygiene
-Mechanics and Repair
-Child Care Provider
-Engineering Technician

Standardized Tests

Not Listed
Not Listed

Demographics

37%
8.7%
63%
4.7%
1.31%

Housing

No
Not Listed
Not Listed
Not Listed

ROTC

Video

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Last Updated Sep, 2021. If this is your college and you wish to make changes to this page sign up by clicking here
Источник: https://www.firstpointusa.com/colleges/north-central-missouri-college-1412

Who Accredits NCMC - Accreditation

Council on Occupational EducationPre-AccreditedEstimated9/14/2013 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedEstimated1/1/1983 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual4/24/2009 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/27/2001 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/26/1985 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/23/2018 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/31/2017 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/23/2018 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual1/23/2014 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual4/3/2019 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/26/1985 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual7/18/2011 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual5/23/2012 - Current
Источник: https://www.univstats.com/colleges/north-central-missouri-college/accreditation/

Are there prerequisites or other requirements for admission to Health Occupations programs?

The admission requirements vary from program to program. The following are general admission requirements for all Health Occupations classes. Many classes have additional requirements which are included with the specific course information.

  • Able to communicate effectively in English. Students may sign up for English as a Second Language (ESL) offered at SCC free of charge.
  • Ability to read at the eighth grade level (minimum).
  • Ability to perform basic math calculations at the seventh grade level (minimum).

Students must also be able to meet the Essential Functions of Core Performance Standards.

ALL CLASSES WITH A CLINICAL COMPONENT REQUIRE A NEGATIVE 2-STEP TB TEST OR CHEST X-RAY, AN ACCEPTABLE BACKGROUND SCREENING FROM THE FAMILY CARE SAFETY REGISTRY AND A URINE DRUG SCREEN.

What is a 2-step TB test?

St. Charles Community College requires some students to provide proof they are free from tuberculosis by completing a 2-step TB Test.

The negative 2-Step TB test can be done at any qualified medical facility – doctor's office, urgent care center, clinic, county health department, etc. The two individual tests must be done within one month of each other (per CDC guidelines) and the series cannot be older than 12 months.

Step One: TB test is administered at a qualified facility. Individual returns to facility within 48-72 hours (as directed by testing facility) to have the test "read" and receive written results.

Step Two: Individual returns to a qualified facility within one month of their first TB test to have the entire procedure completed a second time. Most facilities require at least one full week in between tests.

St. Charles Community College requires copies of BOTH test results in order to fulfill the 2-step TB test requirement.

Individuals who test positive for TB, who have a known reaction to the TB test, or who prefer another option can have a chest X-ray taken or have a TB blood test performed. If a chest X-ray is done, the individual must submit a copy of the "result of findings" report. This report needs to indicate the individual is free from active disease and be signed and dated by the doctor who read the X-ray. Chest X-ray results must be dated within the last three years. If a TB blood test is completed, the individual must submit documentation of the negative results of that test.

What is the Family Care Safety Registry?

The Family Care Safety Registry (FCSR) is the background screening required by the St. Charles Community College Health Occupations program for any students taking a class with a clinical component.

Students must be registered with the Missouri Family Care Safety Registry (FCSR) and provide a copy of the results from an acceptable background screening through that agency. The results cannot be dated earlier than 90 days from the day you register.

There is a small fee charged for this service through the FCSR. Online registration is available at http://www.health.mo.gov/safety/fcsr. Once completed, results from the screening will be mailed directly to the registrant.

Individuals who are already registered with the FCSR will need to call them directly at 866-422-6872 to request updated screening results.

Please note: The name the FCSR screening MUST match the name on the students registration form.

For additional information regarding the registry or your status on the registry, call their toll-free number: 866-422-6872 (8 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday CST).

If the background screening results report adverse findings, students will need to meet with the Health Occupations Program coordinator and receive approval to register for class. For appointments, please contact the coordinator directly at 636-922-8284.

When is the flu vaccine required?

Students completing class or clinical hours during the months of September through March will be required to receive a seasonal flu vaccine. These vaccines can be obtained through your personal physician, an urgent care center, walk-in clinic, county health departments, etc.

For questions of concerns about this requirement, please contact the Health Occupations Program coordinator at 636-922-8284.

What is the MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) series?

The MMR vaccine series consists of two immunizations. Many individuals receive these vaccines as children. St. Charles Community College requires proof that you have received, or are receiving, this series in one of the following ways:

For those who have received the MMR vaccine series previously (whether as children or adults) – Documentation of completion of the entire vaccine series is required upon initial class registration. Please provide official shot records from your physician’s office (current or past).

For those who have received the vaccine series but do not have official documentation – Documentation of a positive vaccine titer is required upon initial class registration. A titer is a blood test that can be run at any qualified medical facility to determine the presence of the specific antibodies necessary to confirm immunity. Please provide official paperwork confirming the completion of this blood titer and indicating the presence of those antibodies (immunities).

For those who have never received the vaccine series or who do not receive a positive titer – Documentation of at least the first immunization in the series is required upon initial class registration. The second immunization is typically given one month after the first and individuals will need to provide documentation of the second immunization (per CDC guidelines) once it is completed. The entire series must be completed prior to beginning clinical hours.

For questions about this requirement, please contact the Health Occupations Program coordinator at 636-922-8284.

What is the Hepatitis B vaccine series?

The Hepatitis B vaccine series consists of three immunizations. St. Charles Community College requires proof that you have received this series in one of the following ways:

For those who have received the Hepatitis B immunization series previously – Documentation of completion of the entire vaccine series is required upon initial class registration. Please provide official shot records from your physician’s office (current or past).

For those who received the vaccine series but do not have official documentation – Documentation of a positive vaccine titer is required upon initial class registration. A titer is a blood test that can be run at any qualified medical facility to determine the presence of the specific antibodies necessary to confirm immunity. Please provide official paperwork confirming the completion of this blood titer and indicating the presence of those antibodies (immunities).

For those who have never received the vaccine series or who do not receive a positive titer – Documentation of at least the first immunization in the series is required upon initial class registration. The second immunization is administered 30 days after the first (per CDC guidelines) and individuals must provide documentation of that immunization once it is administered. The third immunization is administered six months after the first and documentation will need to be provided if the series is completed during the course.

For questions about this requirement, please contact the Health Occupations Program coordinator at 636-922-8284.

How can I register for a Health Occupations Program?

Registrations are processed in the Nursing & Allied Health main office from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. The address is #1 Academy Place, Dardenne Prairie, MO 63368. Students can also register through email by sending all the program registration requirements to [email protected] PLEASE NOTE: PAYMENT IS DUE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION.

Is financial aid available for Health Occupations Programs?

SCC Health Occupations programs are NOT eligible for financial aid. All tuition/fees are due at time of registration and are non-refundable and non-transferable.

What methods of payment are accepted?

Cash, check, money orders or credit/debit cards (excluding American Express) are accepted for tuition and fees.

What is the refund policy for Health Occupations classes?

Health occupations programs are non-refundable and non-transferable. Because these programs are self-supporting, the decision to run a class is based on the number of students enrolled. The college reserves the right to cancel a class if sufficient enrollment is not achieved. Full refunds will be issued to students for classes cancelled by the college.

Does SCC provide job placement services upon completion of a Health Occupations program?

SCC does not provide job placement services. Occasionally job opportunities are posted in the Health Occupations classrooms as well as in ADM 1204. Job search assistance is also available on the Career Services Center Web page.

What is the difference between a "credit" and a "non-credit" or certificate class?

St. Charles Community College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Courses taken for "credit" at SCC will be accepted in transfer by other colleges, provided they are appropriate to the degree sought. "Non-credit" or certificate classes will not show up on a transcript and are not usually accepted for transfer by other institutions.

What happens if a student is absent or tardy for class?

Attendance in class each scheduled week is expected; however, the instructors understand that emergencies can arise. Students are expected to call in and leave a message for the instructor if an absence is unavoidable. Excessive absenteeism or tardiness may result in disciplinary action or removal from class.

What is an open-entry class/when do classes start?

An open-entry class does not have a set start and end date, but runs on a rotating cycle.

How are clinical hours assigned for classes with a clinical component?

Clinical assignments are handled differently for each program. Please refer to your specific program information for details regarding clinical assignments.

When can a student challenge the State CNA final exam?

The state of Missouri has very specific guidelines for allowing an individual to bypass the class and challenge the final exam. Students must contact the Department of Health and Senior Services directly at 573-526-5686 in order to receive a permission to challenge letter. This letter, along with a negative 2-step TB test and an acceptable background screening from the Family Care Safety Registry are required in order to register for the exam. Challenge exams are scheduled approximately four to six weeks after the student registers.

What do I do if I still have questions after reviewing all of the information provided?

Students who need additional clarification regarding health occupations classes offered by St. Charles Community College can call the Health Occupations office at 636-922-8295 or can submit their questions via email to [email protected] PLEASE NOTE: THE MEMBERS OF THE OFFICE STAFF IN CHL 102 ARE NOT QUALIFIED TO PROVIDE ACADEMIC OR CAREER COUNSELING TO STUDENTS.

Students who have questions about Missouri certifications can visit the Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) website at http://health.mo.gov/safety/cnaregistry/faqs.php.

Dismissal from any allied health program because a student has been declared “unsafe,” will make that student ineligible for admission into any SCC Allied Health programs.

Источник: https://www.stchas.edu/academics/departments/Health-Occupations

Dental Hygienists

How to Become a Dental Hygienist About this section

Dental hygienists

Dental hygienists remove tartar and plaque from teeth.

Dental hygienists typically need an associate’s degree in dental hygiene. Programs usually take 3 years to complete. All states require dental hygienists to be licensed; requirements vary by state.

Education

Dental hygienists typically need an associate’s degree in dental hygiene; they may also get a bachelor’s degree. Master’s degree programs in dental hygiene are available but are relatively uncommon. A bachelor’s or master’s degree usually is required for research, teaching, or clinical practice in public or school health programs.

Dental hygiene programs are often found in community colleges, technical schools, and universities. The Commission on Dental Accreditation, part of the American Dental Association, accredits more than 300 dental hygiene programs.

Programs typically take 3 years to complete and offer laboratory, clinical, and classroom instruction. Areas of study include anatomy, medical ethics, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease.

High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to complete prerequisites, which often include college-level north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri. Specific requirements vary by school.

Important Qualities

Critical thinking. Dental hygienists must be able to assess and evaluate patients and to develop oral hygiene care plans.

Communication skills. Dental hygienists must share information with dentists and patients about oral health status, oral hygiene care plans, and, if necessary, lifestyle counseling.

Detail oriented. Dental hygienists must follow specific rules and protocols to help dentists diagnose and treat a patient. Depending on the state in which they work and/or the treatment provided, dental hygienists may work without the direct supervision of a dentist.

Dexterity. Dental hygienists must be good at working with their hands. They generally work in tight spaces on a small part of the body, which requires fine motor skills using precise tools and instruments.

Interpersonal skills. Dental hygienists work closely with dentists. They also must be considerate in working with patients, especially with those who are sensitive to pain or who have fears about undergoing dental treatment.

Problem-solving skills. Dental hygienists develop and implement oral hygiene care plans to maintain or improve patients’ oral health.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Every state requires dental hygienists to be licensed; requirements vary by state. In most states, a degree from an accredited dental hygiene program and passing written and clinical examinations are required for licensure. To maintain licensure, hygienists must complete continuing education requirements. For specific requirements, contact your state’s Board of Dental Examiners.

Many jobs also require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification.

Источник: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-hygienists.htm

Are there prerequisites or other requirements for admission to Health Occupations programs?

The admission requirements vary from program to program. The following are general admission requirements for all Health Occupations classes. Many classes have additional requirements which are included with the specific course information.

  • Able to communicate effectively in English. Students may sign up for English as a Second Language (ESL) offered at SCC free of charge.
  • Ability to read at the eighth grade level (minimum).
  • Ability to perform basic math calculations at the seventh grade level (minimum).

Students must also be able to meet the Essential Functions of Core Performance Standards.

ALL CLASSES WITH A CLINICAL COMPONENT REQUIRE A NEGATIVE 2-STEP TB TEST OR CHEST X-RAY, AN ACCEPTABLE BACKGROUND SCREENING FROM THE FAMILY CARE SAFETY REGISTRY AND A URINE DRUG SCREEN.

What is a 2-step TB test?

St. Charles Community College requires some students to provide proof they are free from tuberculosis by completing a 2-step TB Test.

The negative 2-Step TB test can be done at any qualified medical facility – doctor's office, urgent care center, clinic, county health department, etc. The two individual tests must be done within one month of each other (per CDC guidelines) and the series cannot be older than 12 months.

Step One: TB test is administered at a qualified facility. Individual returns to facility within 48-72 hours (as directed by testing facility) to have the test "read" and receive written results.

Step Two: Individual returns to a qualified facility within one month of their first TB test to have the entire procedure completed a second time. Most facilities require at least one full week in between tests.

St. Charles Community College requires copies of BOTH test results in order to fulfill the 2-step TB test requirement.

Individuals who test positive for TB, who have a known reaction to the TB test, or who prefer another option can have a chest X-ray taken or have a TB blood test performed. If a chest X-ray is done, the individual must submit a copy of the "result of findings" report. This report needs to indicate the individual is free from active disease and be signed and dated by the doctor who read the X-ray. Chest X-ray results must be dated within the last three years. If a TB blood test is completed, the individual must submit documentation of the negative results of that test.

What is the Family Care Safety Registry?

The Family Care Safety Registry (FCSR) is the background screening required by the St. Charles Community College Health Occupations program for any students taking a class with a clinical component.

Students must be registered with the Missouri Family Care Safety Registry (FCSR) and provide a copy of the results from an acceptable background screening through that agency. The results cannot be dated earlier than 90 days from the day you register.

There is a small fee charged for this service through the FCSR. Online registration is available at http://www.health.mo.gov/safety/fcsr. Once completed, results from the screening will be mailed directly to the registrant.

Individuals who are already registered with the FCSR will need to call them directly at 866-422-6872 to request updated screening results.

Please note: The name the FCSR screening MUST match the name on the students registration form.

For additional information regarding the registry or your status on the registry, call their toll-free number: 866-422-6872 (8 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday CST).

If the background screening results report adverse findings, students will need to meet with the Health Occupations Program coordinator and receive approval to register for class. For appointments, please contact the coordinator directly at 636-922-8284.

When is the flu vaccine required?

Students completing class or clinical hours during the months of September through March will be required to receive a seasonal flu vaccine. These vaccines can be obtained through your personal physician, an urgent care center, walk-in clinic, county health departments, etc.

For questions of concerns about this requirement, please contact the Health Occupations Program coordinator at 636-922-8284.

What is the MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) series?

The MMR vaccine series consists of two immunizations. Many individuals receive these vaccines as children. St. Charles Community College requires proof that you have received, or are receiving, this series in one of the following ways:

For those who have received the MMR vaccine series previously (whether as children or adults) – Documentation of completion of the entire vaccine series is required upon initial class registration. Please provide official shot records from your physician’s office (current or past).

For those who have received the vaccine series but do not have official documentation – Documentation of a positive vaccine titer is required upon initial class registration. A titer is a blood test that can be run at any qualified medical facility to determine the presence of the specific antibodies necessary to confirm immunity. Please provide official paperwork confirming the completion of this blood titer and indicating the presence of those antibodies (immunities).

For those who have never received the vaccine series or who do not receive a positive titer – Documentation of at least the first immunization in the series is required upon initial class registration. The second immunization is typically given one month after the first and individuals will need to provide documentation of the second immunization (per CDC guidelines) once it is completed. The entire series must be completed prior to beginning clinical hours.

For questions about this requirement, please contact the Health Occupations Program coordinator at 636-922-8284.

What is the Hepatitis B vaccine series?

The Hepatitis B vaccine series consists of three immunizations. St. Charles Community College requires proof that you have received this series in one of the following ways:

For those who have received the Hepatitis B immunization series previously – Documentation of completion of the entire vaccine series is required upon initial class registration. Please provide official shot records from your physician’s office (current or past).

For those who received the vaccine series but do not have official documentation – Documentation of a positive vaccine titer is required upon initial class registration. A titer is a blood test that can be run at any qualified medical facility to determine the presence of the specific antibodies necessary to confirm immunity. Please provide official paperwork confirming the completion of this blood titer and indicating the presence of those antibodies (immunities).

For those who have never received the vaccine series or who do not receive a positive titer – Documentation of at least the first immunization in the series is required upon initial class registration. The second immunization is administered 30 days after the first (per CDC guidelines) and individuals must provide documentation of that immunization once it is administered. The third immunization is administered six months after the first and documentation will need to be provided if the series is completed during the course.

For questions about this requirement, please contact the Health Occupations Program coordinator at 636-922-8284.

How can I register for a Health Occupations Program?

Registrations are processed in the Nursing & Allied Health main office from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. The address is #1 Academy Place, Dardenne Prairie, MO 63368. Students can also register through email by sending all the program registration requirements to [email protected] PLEASE NOTE: PAYMENT IS DUE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION.

Is financial aid available for Health Occupations Programs?

SCC Health Occupations programs are NOT eligible for financial aid. All tuition/fees are due at time of registration and are non-refundable and non-transferable.

What methods of payment are accepted?

Cash, check, money orders or credit/debit cards (excluding American Express) are accepted for tuition and fees.

What is the refund policy for Health Occupations classes?

Health occupations programs are non-refundable and non-transferable. Because these programs are self-supporting, the decision to run a class is based on the number of students enrolled. The college reserves the right to cancel a class if sufficient enrollment is not achieved. Full refunds will be issued to students for classes cancelled by the college.

Does SCC provide job placement services upon completion of a Health Occupations program?

SCC does not provide job placement services. Occasionally job opportunities are posted in the Health Occupations classrooms as well as in ADM 1204. Job search assistance is also available on the Career Services Center Web page.

What is the difference between a "credit" and a "non-credit" or certificate class?

St. Charles Community College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Courses taken for "credit" at SCC will be accepted in transfer by other colleges, provided free apple app store gift card codes are appropriate to the degree sought. "Non-credit" or certificate classes will not show up on a transcript and are not usually accepted for transfer by other institutions.

What happens if a student is absent or tardy for class?

Attendance in class each scheduled week is expected; however, the instructors understand that emergencies can arise. Students are expected to call in and leave a message for the instructor if an absence is unavoidable. Excessive absenteeism or tardiness may result in disciplinary action or removal from class.

What is an open-entry class/when do classes start?

An open-entry class does not have a set start and end date, but runs on a rotating cycle.

How are clinical hours assigned for classes with a clinical component?

Clinical assignments are handled differently for each program. Please refer to your specific program information for details regarding clinical assignments.

When can a student challenge the State CNA final exam?

The state of Missouri has very specific guidelines for allowing an individual to bypass the class and challenge the final exam. Students must contact the Department of Health and Senior Services directly at 573-526-5686 in order to receive a permission to challenge letter. This letter, along with a negative 2-step TB test and an acceptable background screening from the Family Care Safety Registry are required in order to register for the exam. Challenge exams are scheduled approximately four to six weeks after the student registers.

What do I do if I still have questions after reviewing all of the information provided?

Students who need additional clarification regarding health occupations classes offered by St. Charles Community College can call the Health Occupations office at 636-922-8295 or can submit their questions via email to [email protected] PLEASE NOTE: THE MEMBERS OF THE OFFICE STAFF IN CHL 102 ARE NOT QUALIFIED TO PROVIDE ACADEMIC OR CAREER COUNSELING TO STUDENTS.

Students who have questions about Missouri certifications can visit the Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) website at http://health.mo.gov/safety/cnaregistry/faqs.php.

Dismissal from any allied health program because a student has been declared “unsafe,” will make that student ineligible for admission into any SCC Allied Health programs.

Источник: https://www.stchas.edu/academics/departments/Health-Occupations

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10 Most Affordable Online Colleges in Missouri

Hunting for high-quality, affordable online colleges in Missouri? Affordable Schools is the website for you. We’ve researched the 10 best cheap online Missouri colleges for non-traditional students to complete their degree.

Admitted to the Union on August 10, 1821, Missouri is a landlocked Midwest state that covers 69,714 square miles between Illinois and Kansas. The Census Bureau ranks Missouri the 18th most populous with 6.13 million people. It’s projected that the fast-growing state will see a 21 percent population increase by 2030. Residents have a diverse array of 27 public, 55 private nonprofit, and 44 for-profit Missouri colleges to choose from. Full-time Missouri college enrollment is nearly 197,000 combined. The University of Missouri system has four top-notch branches endowed for $1.67 billion total with 76,037 learners. Saint Louis University, the oldest post-secondary school west of the Mississippi River, attracts 12,649 pupils from 80+ nations. The College of the Ozarks is one of America’s first tuition-free universities paid by on-campus work. A.T. Still University was also the world’s first osteopathic medical school in 1892. From Springfield to Columbia, there are many unique higher learning opportunities to suit everyone’s needs.

The U.S. News & World Report considers Missouri the 26th best state for higher education after K-12. Eighty-nine percent of Missourians hold at least a high school diploma. Yet, the college degree attainment rate is only 28.6 percent. One potential bachelor’s barrier is tuition. Missourians have an average per capita income of $29,537 yearly. Affording university costs in the “Show Me State” is difficult for many. Missouri colleges have median prices of $10,006 in-state and $32,234 out-of-state each year. Expenses can grow even bigger at certain private institutions. For instance, Washington University in St. Louis is billing $56,300 for 2020-21 tuition. Rockhurst University has a $37,600 annual price before room and board. Unsurprisingly, Missouri graduates report a mean loan debt of $27,108. Don’t let your monetary situation destroy your college dreams though. Missouri institutions with below-average costs are available. We’ll present 10 affordable online schools in Missouri that require less than $8,000 per year!

Methodology

First, Affordable Schools used the National Center for Education Statistics database to look up cheap Missouri online colleges. Our researchers sought out four-year institutions in Missouri with bachelor’s and advanced degrees. We used the browse button to select distance education for 100 percent online programs. The “Mother of the West” had an initial pool of 43 colleges with virtual learning. Second, we accessed the U.S. Department of Education to check the accreditation status. Current regional accreditation from the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association (HLC-NCA) was required to make the cut. Unaccredited options were nixed to weed out low-quality schools and scam diploma mills. Third, our staff evaluated the affordability of each school’s 2018-19 tuition and fees. We only weighed the in-state average costs for full-time undergrads. The 10 cheapest rates were chosen for our ranking. Here are our most affordable online colleges in Missouri in descending order by in-state tuition.

Ranking Low-Cost Online Missouri Colleges

10. Northwest Missouri State University

Maryville, MO

northwest-missouri-state-university

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $7,844

Chosen for the 2018 Christa McAuliffe Excellence in Teacher Education Award, Northwest Missouri State University is a public, four-year AASCU member led by President John Jasinski that’s endowed for $36.5 million to serve 7,000 Bearcats from 44 states and 37 countries for 96.6 percent job placement. Northwest Missouri’s seven HLC-accredited schools have an average class size of 27 on its 370-acre Maryville campus near Mozingo Lake Park and online. The U.S. News & World Report ranked NMSU the 95th top Midwest school with the 78th best social mobility. On Niche, NMSU boasts America’s 141st best sport management program. CEO Magazine applauded Northwest Missouri for the 32nd top MBA online. Northwest Missouri State University starts our 10 best affordable online schools with a $7,844 in-state price. Celebrating its 20th year, Northwest Online follows an accelerated, seven-week format for 250+ Canvas courses with 24/7 tech support. Online pupils can pursue four bachelor’s and 15 graduate degrees like the:

  • Bachelor of Science in Business Technology
  • Bachelor of Science in Marketing
  • RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Master of Science in Recreation
  • Master of Business Administration in Management
  • Master of Science in Special Education
  • Master of Business Administration in Data Analytics
  • Master of Science in Geographic Information Science
  • Master of Science in Health and Physical Education
  • Education Specialist in Educational Leadership

9. University of Central Missouri

Warrensburg, MO

university-of-central-missouri

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $7,673

Given the 2019 IMC Foster/Inglish Award north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri Outstanding Achievement, the University of Central Missouri is a public, coed COPHE member that’s endowed for $45.4 million under President Roger Best to educate 12,300 Mules from 50 countries with a 16:1 student-faculty ratio. Four HLC-accredited Central Missouri colleges teach online, on its 1,561-acre Warrensburg campus, and at Whiteman Air Force Base for 97 percent job placement success. The U.S. News & World Report ranked UCM 83rd for online MBA degrees and 48th for online veteran education. Niche named UCM America’s 258th top teaching college and 298th best public institution. Washington Monthly crowned UCM the 122th best Midwest buck. The University of Central Missouri is our ninth best cheap Missouri online college with $7,673 in-state tuition. On Blackboard, the Extended Studies Division delivers 400+ eight- and 16-week online courses with Quality Matters certification. Online students can finish six bachelor’s and 29 graduate degrees, including the:

  • Bachelor of Science in Crisis and Disaster Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Safety and Risk Management
  • Master of Science in Behavior Analysis and Therapy
  • Master of Science in Elementary Mathematics Education
  • Master of Science in Library and Information Services
  • Master of Science in Social Gerontology
  • Master of Science in Aviation Safety Management
  • Education Specialist in Human Services
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Technology Management

8. Lincoln University

Jefferson City, MO

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $7,632

Home to the 2018 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Education winner, Lincoln University is a public, land-grant historically Black TMCF member managed by President Jerald Woolfolk with a $10.7 million endowment to support 2,182 undergrad and 101 post-grad Blue Tigers from 19 nations. Five HLC-accredited Lincoln colleges are available at its 167-acre Jefferson City campus and online with an 18:1 student-faculty ratio for 49 percent freshman retention. The U.S. News & World Report ranked Lincoln the 59th best HBCU and 70th top social mobility performer. On Niche, LU has America’s 231st best Greek life and 436th most conservative students. Washington Monthly named LU the 308th top master’s college. Lincoln University is the AS Staff’s eighth best affordable Missouri school online with a $7,632 in-state average. Based in Martin Luther King Hall, the Extended Studies Department begins 150+ online classes each eight-week session. Online learners log into Canvas 24/7 for the following 10 degrees:

  • Hybrid RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Master of Arts in Higher Education
  • Master of Education in School Administration
  • Master of Business Administration in Accounting
  • Master of Education in Elementary Education
  • Master of Business Administration in Management
  • Master of Education in Secondary Education
  • Master of Business Administration in Information Systems
  • Master of Education in Special Education
  • Master of Business Administration in Public Administration/Policy

7. Southeast Missouri State University

Cape Girardeau, MO

southeast-missouri-state-university

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $7,418

Granted a 2018 Online Learning Consortium Effective Practices Award, Southeast Missouri State University is a public, coed AACSB member headed by President Carlos Vargas-Aburto that’s endowed for $79 million to teach 9,524 undergrad and 1,113 post-grad Redhawks from 52 nations. Five HLC-accredited Southeast Missouri colleges are accessed on its 328-acre Cape Girardeau campus, at four satellites, and online with a 20:1 student-faculty ratio. The U.S. News & World Report ranked SEMO 92nd for online business and 123rd for online bachelor’s education. Forbes named SEMO the 58th best mid-size employer. The IIE placed Southeast Missouri 28th for studying abroad. Southeast Missouri State University is Affordable Schools’ seventh best cheap online college with a $7,418 in-state value. Since 2004, Southeast Online has developed 300+ eight- or 16-week Moodle courses and 550 corporate partnerships for 92 percent job placement. Online majors enter 14 bachelor’s and 18 master’s programs, such as:

  • Bachelor of Applied Science in Applied Technology
  • Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Studies
  • Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
  • Master of Arts in Applied Behavior Analysis
  • Master of Science in Technology Management
  • Master of Arts in Exceptional Child Education
  • Master of Science in Criminal Justice
  • Master of Arts in Teacher Leadership

6. Missouri State University

Springfield, MO

missouri-state-university

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $7,376

Conferred a 2019 CASE District VI Gold Circle of Excellence Award, Missouri State University is a public, civic-engaged AAUW member administered by President Clifton M. Smart III with a $287 million budget to employ 763 full-time faculty instructing 23,697 Bears from 85+ countries at a 21:1 ratio. Eight HLC-accredited colleges achieve an average 77 percent retention rate online, on its 225-acre Springfield campus, and at three extensions from West Plains to China. The U.S. News & World Report ranked MSU 176th for online bachelor’s and 179th for online MBA programs. Forbes crowns Missouri State the 187th top public school. Sierra Magazine labeled MSU the 80th coolest college. Missouri State University stands sixth among our affordable online colleges in Missouri with $7,376 in-state pricing. On Blackboard, the Missouri State Outreach Division has NC-SARA approval to deliver 300+ online courses anywhere each eight-week block. Online students pick from 11 bachelor’s and 18 graduate degrees like the:

  • Bachelor of Applied Science in Hospitality Leadership
  • Bachelor of Science in Professional Writing
  • Bachelor of Science in Information Technology
  • Bachelor of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Bachelor of Science in Psychology
  • Master of Science in Project Management
  • Master of Science in Nursing Education
  • Master of Science in Child Life Studies
  • Master of Science in Cybersecurity
  • Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice (CRNA-DNAP)

5. Logan University

Chesterfield, MO

Logan-University

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Average In-State Tuition: $6,800

Bestowed the 2017 WMA Best University Website Award, Logan University is a private, nonprofit health-focused CCE member guided by President Clay McDonald that’s endowed for $26.4 million to educate 203 undergrad and 1,379 post-grad Leopards with 50+ articulation agreements. Two HLC-accredited Logan colleges have a 100 percent admission rate online and on its 112-acre Chesterfield campus in the Missouri River Valley for a 12:1 student-faculty ratio. The Financial Engineer ranked Logan University the fifth best chiropractic school. College Factual placed Logan 11th for biological science programs. Intelligent.com recognized Logan for the 12th best sports medicine and third top nutrition degrees. Logan University made Affordable Schools’ top five cheap online colleges in Missouri with $6,800 in-state expenses. On Canvas, the College of Health Sciences admits post-grads with minimum 2.5 GPAs each 15-week online trimester. Full Academic Support Center services are available for four online programs:

  • Master of Science in Health Informatics
  • Master of Science in Nutrition and Human Performance
  • Master of Science in Sports Science and Rehabilitation
  • Doctor of Health Professions Education

4. Missouri Southern State University

Joplin, MO

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Website

Average In-State Tuition: $6,503

Presented the 2019 LCLCA Website Excellence Award, Missouri Southern State University is a public, four-year MIAA member on Route 66 that’s supervised by President Alan D. Marble and endowed for $21 million to enroll 5,754 Lions in 140 majors with 96 percent acceptance. Four HLC-accredited Missouri Southern colleges maintain an 18:1 student-faculty ratio on its 373-acre Joplin campus, at the Law Enforcement Academy, and online. The U.S. News & World Report ranked MSSU in the top 70 Midwest schools with the 47th best social mobility. On Niche, MSSU has Missouri’s 18th safest environment and 19th best athletics. Washington Monthly deemed MSSU the 116th best regional value. Missouri Southern State University finished fourth among the AS Staff’s affordable online Missouri colleges with $6,503 in-state tuition. The Distance Learning Department uses Blackboard and the Student Success Center to deliver eight-week online classes. Over 1,050 online students pursue nine bachelor’s and 10 certificates, such as the:

  • Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Administration
  • Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Therapy
  • Bachelor of Applied North central missouri college dental hygienist missouri in Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health and Safety
  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
  • Bachelor of Science in Health Science
  • Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene
  • Specialist in Management Certificate
  • Entrepreneurial Marketing Certificate
  • Safety and Hazard Prevention Certificate

3. Drury University

Springfield, MO

drury-university

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $6,247

Honored with the NCAA Council of Presidents’ 2019 Academic Excellence Award, Drury University is a private, nonprofit Disciples of Christ CCCU member led by President Timothy Cloyd that’s endowed for $97.5 million to inspire 5,474 Panthers from 54 nations for 99 percent job placement. Sixteen HLC-accredited Drury departments enroll students with an average 3.79 GPA online, on its 88-acre Springfield campus, and at six extensions for a 13:1 student-faculty ratio. The U.S. News & World Report ranked Drury University 161st for online teaching and 208th for online bachelor’s programs. On Niche, DU features America’s 79th best criminal justice school. Kiplinger’s crowned DU the 73rd best private value. Drury University is our third best affordable Missouri online college that charges $6,247 in-state. Since 2004, the College of Continuing Professional Studies has offered eight- and 16-week online courses on Moodle with F.W. Olin Library access. Online learners can earn 20 undergrad majors, including the:

  • Associate of Science in Pre-Ministerial Studies
  • Associate of Science in Emergency Management
  • Associate of Science in English and Writing
  • Associate of Science in Paralegal Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Behavioral and Community Health
  • Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
  • Bachelor of Science in Health Services Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Spanish
  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
  • Bachelor of Science in Sociology

2. Central Methodist University

Fayette, MO

central-methodist-university

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $5,760

Lauded a 2018 NAIA Champions of Character Institution Award finalist, Central Methodist University is a private, nonprofit Protestant IAMSCU member overseen by President Roger Drake that’s endowed for $31.4 million to train 3,863 Eagles from 50 states with a 12:1 student-faculty ratio. Two HLC-accredited Central Methodist colleges are available online, at its 55-acre Fayette headquarters, and on 14 regional campuses with a 67 percent financial aid rate. The U.S. News & World Report ranked CMU the 78th top Midwest college and 15th best social mobility performer. College Factual declared CMU the 218th best value with the 328th most gender diversity. Washington Monthly named CMU the 138th top baccalaureate institution. Central Methodist University is our second best cheap online Missouri school with a $5,760 in-state annual total. The College of Graduate & Extended Studies has 250+ accelerated, eight-week online courses on MyCMU. Online pupils pursue 24 bachelor’s and three master’s like the:

  • Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education
  • Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Sports Management
  • Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration
  • Bachelor of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis
  • Bachelor of Arts in Sociology
  • Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
  • Bachelor of Accountancy
  • Master of Science in Mathematics
  • Master of Science in Clinical Nurse Leadership

1. Harris-Stowe State University

St. Louis, MO

Harris-Stowe-State-University

Website

Average In-State Tuition: $5,388

Picked for the 2016 Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation Grant, Harris-Stowe State University is a public, four-year historically Black TMCF member headed by President Dwaun Warmack with a $1.4 million endowment to empower 1,716 Hornets from 31 countries at a 15:1 student-faculty ratio. Three Harris-Stowe State academic units report 53 percent retention on its 22-acre St. Louis campus and online with 60+ clubs. The U.S. News & World Report ranked Harris-Stowe State in the top 76 HBCUs with the 65th best social mobility. On Walmart asurion sign in, HSSU boasts America’s 72nd best location and 130th best Greek life. College Factual placed HSSU 32nd for general education and 77th for criminal justice. Harris-Stowe State University scored the #1 spot among affordable online Missouri colleges with cheap $5,388 in-state tuition. For $210 per credit, HSSU Online fills eight- and 12-week terms with HLC-accredited Blackboard classes. Students can take online or hybrid courses across 22 bachelor’s majors, such as the:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Urban Affairs
  • Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
  • Bachelor of Professional Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Health Care Management
  • Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education
  • Bachelor of Science in Information Sciences
  • Bachelor of Science in Hospitality and Tourism Management
  • Bachelor of Arts in Educational Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

In May 2018, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the Missouri workforce of 2.81 million had an average annual salary of $46,460. Management positions more than double the mean income to $107,410. Getting promoted to upper-level jobs is often impossible without a college degree. About 65 percent of today’s new jobs require education beyond high school. This includes fast-growing Missouri careers like operations analyst, web developer, physical therapist, and information technology manager. Missouri fortunately has abundant financial aid available to help afford college for these in-demand professions though. For example, the Bright Flight Scholarship provides up to $3,000 for Missouri high school graduates with SAT/ACT scores in the top 5th percentile. The Access Missouri Grant offers need-based $300-$2,850 awards to in-state undergrads with an expected family contribution below $12,000. Other programs include the Kids’ Chance Scholarship, Fast Track Incentive Grant, A+ Scholarship, Advanced Placement Grant, Wartime Veteran’s Survivors Grant, Marguerite Ross Barnett Memorial Scholarship, and Public Service Officer Survivor Grant. Applying for financial aid will make low-cost online Missouri colleges even cheaper.

AS Staff

February 2020

This concludes our list of the 10 most affordable online colleges in Missouri for 2020.

Источник: https://affordableschools.net/online/missouri/

Missouri Southern State University

Missouri Southern State University (Missouri Southern, MSSU, or MoSo) is a public university in Joplin, Missouri, United States. It was established in 1937 as Joplin Junior College.

History[edit]

Missouri Southern State University was founded in 1937 as Joplin Junior College.[2] At its conception, Joplin Junior College had 114 students and only 9 faculty members. In 1964, residents of Jasper County, Missouri approved a $2.5 million bond issue to begin construction on a new campus, where the university is currently located. The new campus opened in the fall of 1967 with 2,399 students and 95 faculty members. In 1977, the school was renamed Missouri Southern State College and officially became a state-assisted four-year college and part of the state of Missouri's higher education system. In 2003, the Missouri Discover credit card vs chase freedom unlimited Assembly authorized the renaming of the college to Missouri Southern State University - Joplin; in 2005 the university dropped Joplin from its name.

In 1967, the campus was home to six buildings. The Taylor Performing Arts center was completed in 1973 and the Richard M. Webster Communications and Social Science Building opened in August 1992.

Missouri Southern recently finished construction on a health sciences building. The building, which had its groundbreaking on May 19, 2008, was built with money secured by MOHELA and distributed to MSSU by the state of Missouri. The Missouri General Assembly had entertained the addition of the Joplin Regional Center, owned by the Missouri Department of Mental Health, to Missouri Southern's campus in spring of 2009.[3]

The school is about 30 blocks northeast of the worst of the devastation of the 2011 Joplin tornado which destroyed much of southern Joplin on May 22, 2011—one day after the school's graduation. Joplin High School had just completed its school graduation on the campus shortly before the tornado. The Leggett and Platt Athletic Center was used as an emergency shelter for victims. Billingsly Student Center was the headquarters for volunteer efforts run by Americorps St. Louis and was the coordination area for identifying victims and survivors. On May 29, 2011, Barack Obama, who was inspecting the damage, spoke at the Taylor Performing Arts Center.[4][5]

[edit]

Missouri Southern has had seven presidents that have served since its beginning in 1967.[6]

TitleNameDates
PresidentLeon C. Billingsly1967–1978
PresidentDr. Donald C. Darnton1979–1982
PresidentDr. Julio León1982–2007
Interim PresidentDr. Teri Agee2007–2008
PresidentDr. Bruce Speck2008–2013
PresidentDr. Alan Marble2013–2020
PresidentDr. Dean Van Galen2020–present

Campus[edit]

Barack Obama at Missouri Southern on May 29, 2011, during a memorial service for victims of the 2011 tornado.

The campus of Missouri Southern is cross divided by Duquesne Road (running north–south) and Newman Road (running east–west). The main portion of the campus is located west of Duquesne, though the football stadium and softball fields are on the east side of Duquesne.

Academic buildings[edit]

Spiva Library (opened in 1967) was the first building built on the current campus following the properties purchase for use by what was then Missouri Southern College. The library is named after prominent Joplin businessman George A. Spiva (1904–1967),[7] who was a major donor and supporter of the school. Expansions to the library in 1972–1973 and 1999–2000 have tripled the size of the original structure. Prior to 1987, the social sciences department utilized some areas of the building for classrooms and offices.[8]

Reynolds Hall (opened in 1967) is named after one of the original members of the school's board of regents, Lauren R. Reynolds (1916–1968). He served on the board from 1965 until his death.[9] This building houses the biology and environmental health, chemical and physical sciences, and mathematics departments. On Dec. 5, 2014, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced that he would request more than $5.2 million in funding from the state legislature for renovations to the building. The funds will allow MSSU to renovate labs, classrooms and electrical systems.[10][11]

Hearnes Hall (opened in 1967) is named after former Missouri Governor Warren E. Hearnes (1923–2009) who was governor at the time of the construction of the campus and signed the law which made Missouri Southern a state institution. Hearnes Hall is the university's administration building, but was previously home to English department (now located in Kuhn Hall) and the communications department (now located in Webster Hall). Hearnes Hall has never been expanded, but underwent major renovations ending in 2012.

Fine Arts Building (opened in 1967) is the home to the music and art departments. It is also home of the Spiva Gallery and is connected to both the Taylor Performing Arts Center and the Bud Walton Black Box Theatre.

Leon C. Billingsly Student Center (opened in 1969) is named after the first president of what was then Missouri Southern College, Leon C. Billingsly (1925–1978). Billingsly served in that capacity from 1964 until his death and supervised the construction of the original buildings on the campus.[12] The building is home to the cafeteria, book store and Keystone and Connor ballrooms. Formerly known as the College Union, it was renamed for Billingsly in 1980, two years after his death. It has been expanded multiple times, the latest in 2009 when the George S. Beimdiek Recreation Center and Willcoxon Student Health Center were added onto it.[6]

Kuhn Hall (opened in 1969) is named after Dr. John Raymond Kuhn (1902–1986) a Joplin area doctor who encouraged more practical application medical training at the college. It was originally home to the nursing (now in the Health Sciences Building) and computer science departments (now in Plaster Hall). Today it is home to the English department.[citation needed] The neighboring Kuhn Annex, which was built in 1963 and also houses part of the English department, was originally a north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri home for a proposed housing subdivision planned by Rolla Stephens on the former Mission Hills estate. When Stephens learned of the search for a new campus for the college, he worked with George A. Spiva and Morgan Hillhouse so the land could instead be used for that purpose.[12]

Ummel Technology Center (opened in 1971) is named for Elvin Byron Ummel (1922–1993), who served on the school's board of trustees from the 1964 to 1986, when that body was abolished. The center now houses some of the programs falling under the biology and environmental health department in the School of Arts and Sciences, including the cadaver lab.[13] It underwent a major renovation in 2011 and 2012 and had previously been used for technology and engineering courses, including automotive technology and drafting.

Thomas E. Taylor Performing Arts Center (opened in 1974) is named for former Missouri Southern board of regents member (1965–1974) and board of trustees member (1964–1975) Thomas E. Taylor (1902–1975). The 2,000-seat performing arts center was built on a $1 million bond and is home to the theatre department.

Taylor Hall (opened in 1977) also known as the Gene Taylor Education Center is named for U.S. Congressman Gene Taylor (1928–1998). Taylor had served on the board of trustees from 1964 to 1972 and was the president of that board at the time the current campus opened in 1967.[12] Taylor Hall has been home to the school of education and psychology since its construction, though it has been enlarged since that time.

Mills Anderson Justice Center (opened in 1978) is named for former Missouri Southern board of regents (1965–1977) member Mills Anderson (1914–1999). It is home of the college's criminal justice department and law enforcement academy. It was greatly expanded in 1996.[12]

Plaster Hall (opened in 1980) is also known as the Robert W. Plaster Free Enterprise Center and is named for Robert W. Plaster (1930–2008), a former Joplin Junior College student and the founder of Empire Gas.[14] Formerly known as Matthews Hall and named after Norval M. Matthews (1895–1977), an original member of the school's board of regents from 1965 until his death, the building and the school of business, which has resided in it since its construction, were renamed after Plaster in 2006 when he made the largest donation in the college's history. Prior to this building's construction, the school of business had been located in the former Mission Hills mansion, today the Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center, from 1969 to 1980.[15]

Webster Hall (opened in 1992) is named for Richard M. Webster (1922–1990), a former speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives and a longtime state senator representing the area from 1962 until his death. The building cost $7.5 million at the time of its construction and is home to the social sciences, communications, foreign languages, and international studies departments. The W. Robert Corley Auditorium is located inside Webster Hall. It was named after William Robert Corley, a local businessman following a significant donation by him in 2009.

Bud Walton Black Box Theatre (opened in 1999) is named for Bud Walton, brother of Walmart founder Sam Walton and a financial donor for the construction of the facility. The Walton Black Box Theatre was built as a replacement for the college's previous Barn Theatre, which was destroyed by fire in 1990.[16]

Julio S. Leon Health Sciences Center (opened in 2010) is named for Dr. Julio Leon, who served as the president of the University from 1982 to 2007. It houses programs in nursing, dental hygiene, kinesiology, medical technology, psychology, radiologic technology and respiratory therapy.

Jeremiah "Jay" Nixon Hall (opened in 2019) is named for the 55th governor of Missouri Jeremiah "Jay" Nixon, who served from 2009 to 2017. Governor Nixon campaigned and received $5.2 million that was used to construct the hall and renovate the nearby Reynolds hall. Nixon hall is used for mathematics and other STEM fields. The building is three stories and houses staff offices, study rooms, and many classrooms. It is connected to Reynolds hall via a sky bridge on the second floor and is the newest building on campus.

Alumni Center[edit]

The Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center (opened in 2011) is named after Ralph L. Gray, a major donor for the building's restoration. The building, also known as the Mission Hills mansion, is the oldest structure on campus, built in 1926 as the private home of Lucius Buchanan. When the property was purchased for use as the university's campus in 1964, the mansion was originally used by then President Leon Billingsly for his office space. It then served as the home of the school of business from 1969 to 1980 and the social sciences department between 1987 and 1992. It sat empty from 1992 until 2006, when the process of restoring and renovating it for its current use started.[15]

Former buildings[edit]

Joplin Junior College at 4th Street & Byers Avenue (1938–1959) was the first permanent home of the college (the year previously the college's courses were taught in the Joplin High School building at 8th Street and Wall Avenue). The building, which was originally constructed in 1897 and then nearly doubled in size in 1907, had previously served as the home of Joplin High School and later as North Junior High School before being renovated for use by the fledgling college. Joplin Junior College moved out of the building in 1959, moving to the now unused former home of Joplin High School at 8th Street and Wall Avenue. The 4th Street & Byers Avenue building was razed in 1961.

Blaine Hall (1946–1959) was named after Harry E. Blaine, the dean of Joplin Junior College from 1937 to 1947. It is not to be confused with the dormitory on the current campus that is also named after Blaine. It was located in a formerly private residence that was near Joplin Junior College's first home at the corner of 4th Street and Byers Avenue. Blaine Hall acted as a student union and had a cafeteria and a student lounge. The building was abandoned by the college when it moved to its second home at 8th Street and Wall Avenue in 1959. It was eventually torn down.

Joplin Junior College/Jasper County Community College at 8th Street and Wall Avenue (1959–1967) was the second permanent home of what was then Joplin Junior College (though the first year the college had offered courses in 1937 those classes had also taken place in this building). During the time the college was in this north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri it was renamed Jasper County Community College. This structure was built in 1917 as the home of Joplin High School, replacing the previous building at 4th Street & Byers Avenue, which was also home to Joplin Junior College from 1938 to 1959. The college was in this building from 1959 until 1967, when it moved to its current campus. The building became Memorial High School from 1968 to 1985 and then Memorial Middle School. The nearly 100-year-old structure still stands and now serves as the Joplin public school district's Memorial Education Center.

The Barn Theatre (1967–1990) was the first performing arts space on the current university campus. It had originally served as a dairy barn for the Mission Hills farm. With a limited budget and no theatre space included among the original academic buildings planned for the campus, theatre department staff transformed the former dairy barn into the campus's first theatre. It remained popular and in use even after the construction of the much larger and modern Thomas E. Taylor Center for Performing Arts in 1973. The Barn Theatre was destroyed by a fire on Thanksgiving Day in 1990.[16]

The Learning Center (1967–2005) was renovated out of the shell of the former garage of the Mission Hills mansion. The original space had been expanded and at previous times housed the school of business and the department of social sciences. In 1992 it was remodeled for use for student tutoring and other similar needs. It was north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri in 2005 to make way for the construction of the George S. Beimdiek Recreation Center and Willcoxon Student Health Center and for the renovation of the Mission Hills mansion into the Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center, which takes up some of the footprint previously occupied by the Learning Center.

The Guest House (1967–2005) had served as a guest house for the Mission Hills mansion when it was a private residence. But following the establishment of the university on its current campus, the school's newspaper, The Chart, had its offices in this building, though they were later moved to Hearnes Hall and are currently located inside Webster Hall. The building served various other purposes as office space and eventually storage for the university before being razed in 2005.

Campus life[edit]

[edit]

The campus has two traditional dormitories, eight apartment-style housing north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri, and two suite-style dormitories. The dormitories are McCormick and Blaine Halls; the apartments are Gockel, Stegge, Dishman, Dryer, Stone, Headlee, Maupin, and Mitchell Halls; and the suite-style dorms are located in East Hall and The Quads. Also a part of the residence area of campus is the Mayes Student Life Center, which is home to the university's cafeteria, weight room, residence computer labs, and commons area. These dorms house about 600 students. The Quads, opened fall of 2015, is a three-story complex that features 51 student apartments the vast majority of which will be four bedrooms.

[edit]

Blaine Hall (opened in 1971) is named after Harry E. Blaine (1873–1955), who served as the first dean of what was then Joplin Junior College from its opening in 1937 until his retirement in 1947. This facility is all male and is arranged as a traditional style dormitory, housing 174 students, mostly freshmen.[17]

McCormick Hall (opened in 1971) is named after Martha McCormick (1902–1987), who taught mathematics from 1939 to 1973 at what was first Joplin Junior College and then later Missouri Southern State College. This facility houses 90 students and was one of the first two dormitories built on the campus, housing only female students since it opened.[17]

Dishman Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Darral Dishman (1936–1984), who started as an art professor at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1964. He later became head of the department and remained at the college until his death. Dishman Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Dryer Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Dr. Lloyd L. Dryer (1911–1984), who was a professor of psychology at what was first Joplin Junior College and then Missouri Southern State College. Dryer Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Gockel Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Harry Gockel (1902–1984), who started at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1939, just two years after its founding, and retired from the college in 1972. He was a professor of history, economics and geography. A bequest in his and his late wife's, Berniece Gockel (1911–1995), will provided the seed money for the university's annual Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium. Gockel Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Headlee Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Cleetus Juanita Headlee (1911–2000), who from 1946 to 1976 was an English professor at what was then Joplin Junior College and later Missouri Southern State College. Between 1948 and 1967 she was the advisor for the college newspaper, The Chart. Headlee Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Stegge Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Dudley Frank Stegge (1923–1992), who started at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1951 as a track and football coach. Stegge later served as dean of students from 1967 to 1969 and was the director of the Student Union, now Billingsly Student Center, from 1969 until his retirement in 1980. Stegge Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Maupin Hall (opened in 1987) is named after Dr. Jim Maupin (1923–2006), who served as dean of technology at what was then Missouri Southern State College, retiring in 1992. He started his career with the college in 1954 teaching biology. Maupin Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Mitchell Hall (opened in 1987) is named after Grace Clayton Mitchell (1920–2006), a longtime English professor at what was first Joplin Junior College and later Missouri Southern State College. She first taught at the school in 1946 and after taking a break from teaching returned in 1958 and remained until retiring in 1981. Mitchell Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Stone Hall (opened in 1991) is named after Dorothy Aleta Stone (1909–2001), who was a professor of business administration at what was first Joplin Junior College and then Missouri Southern State College from 1939 to 1975. Stone Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students.[17]

Mayes Student Life Center (opened in 1993) is named for Dianne S. Mayes (1936–1995), a longtime supporter of the university. The facility includes a computer lab, laundry facilities, vending machines, aerobic workout room, weight room and a large-screen television lounge for all students, faculty and staff.[6] A major addition, including a cafeteria, was added in 1999.[17]

East Hall (opened in 2002) is the largest of the university's residential buildings. It houses 202 students in suite style dormitories.[17] East hall is named because it is the easternmost residential building on campus.

The Quads (opened in 2015) is the newest of the university's dormitories. The name "Quads" come from the 4 bedroom style in which each "room" is built. There is a living area, kitchen, 4 bedrooms, each with their own bathroom, and a laundry room in each "Quad." The Quads house 200 students.

Greek life[edit]

Currently, MSSU is home to three fraternities, two sororities and many honorary and professional societies. MSSU has the Pi-Eta chapter of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, and the Delta Pi chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity. Phi Delta Theta began operating on campus in 2020. Missouri Southern has the Zeta Alpha chapter of the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority and the Eta Upsilon chapter of the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. Missouri Southern does not have any brick-and-mortar or traditional greek housing.

Student organizations, groups and activities[edit]

There are over 70 student organizations. These organizations range from ethnic to political, religious to special interest.

MSSU Student Senate (SS) is the official voice of the student body at Missouri Southern State University. SS strives to find solutions to campus issues by making policy recommendations to the administration. SS is a forum for problems, concerns, questions, suggestions, and ideas as they relate to student life on campus. SS serves as the governing body for all students and more than 70 student organizations on campus. SS was established in MSSU's early years and has been active on campus ever since. SS is entirely funded by student fees, receiving a budget of $20,000 each academic year. Meetings are held once a week on Wednesdays and are open to the public.

The Campus Activities Board (CAB) orchestrates activities and programs in the Billingsly Student Union and around campus. CAB is a student-run programming board dedicated to enhancing the college experience at Missouri Southern. By effectively utilizing the Student Involvement Fee, CAB aims to provide educational, entertaining, cultural, and leisure opportunities to complement the students' academic experience.

Intramural sports are also available on campus. The University also supports students competing in collegiate mock trial as governed by the American Mock Trial Association.

Missouri Southern currently has many student organizations including Student Senate, Campus Activities Board, 34 Departmental organizations, 12 honors organizations, 9 religious organizations, and 19 special interest organizations. The university also has a school newspaper, The Chart, and an alumni magazine, Crossroads.[18]

Intramurals[edit]

Missouri Southern has a sophisticated intramural sports program. Sports included are flag football, softball, whiffleball, volleyball, 5-on-5 basketball, 3-on-3 basketball, mini-golf, soccer, hold-'em poker, bowling, table tennis, dodgeball and billiards.

Athletics[edit]

Main article: Missouri Southern Lions

Missouri Southern's mascot is the Lions. The Lions play in NCAA Division II as a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association. MSSU fields seven men's and seven women's sports.[19] The program has had over 250 All-Americans in its history after starting off as a member of the NAIA and in 1989 joining the NCAA. The program was a member of the Central States Intercollegiate Conference while a member of the NAIA.

Notable alumni[edit]

  • Allen Barbre, offensive lineman for the Green Bay Packers, Seattle Seahawks, Miami Dolphins and Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League.
  • Bob Beatty, American football coach.
  • Lonny Chapman, actor.
  • Richard Jordan, former National Football League linebacker for the Detroit Lions.
  • Terry Joyce, punter for the National Football League's St. Louis Cardinals in the 1970s.
  • Janet L. Kavandi, NASAastronaut.
  • Roderick C. Meredith, evangelist for Radio Church of God who also formed the Global Church of God.
  • Gary Nodler, Missouri State Senator.
  • J. Eddie Peck, television and film actor. His best-known roles include Cole Howard on The Young and the Restless and Jake Martin on All My Children.
  • Ron Richard, Speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives.
  • Rod Smith, wide receiver for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League, 1995–2008.
  • Jeff Speakman, Martial artist and actor.
  • James Thrash, wide receiver for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League.
  • Dennis Weaver, actor. He is best known for his television roles in Gunsmoke and McCloud as well as the early Steven Spielberg thriller Duel.
  • Brandon Williams, defensive tackle for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League.

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_Southern_State_University

Dental Staff

Jeffry Gardner, D.D.S.

Dr. Gardner began his childhood in Clarksdale, Missouri and later graduated from Maysville High School. He continued his education at the University of Missouri, Columbia and earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Biochemistry. Immediately following Mizzou, he entered dental school at the University Of Missouri Kansas City School Of Dentistry where he received his Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree in 1997.

After spending three years in Indianola, Iowa with a small group practice, Dr. Gardner and his wife, Darchelle chose Maryville as the place they wanted call home. Today they are blessed with two children, Alex and Katie. Alex completed his undergrad at Mizzou in May of 2021, and is starting dental school at UMKC in the fall. Katie is attending Oklahoma State University.

Dr. Gardner is a member of the American Dental Association, Missouri Dental Association and Northwest Missouri Dental Society where he has served as President and Treasurer. He is an active member of the Maryville Host Lions Club, the Mozingo Advisory Board and Countryside Christian Church.

In his time away from the office, Dr. Gardner enjoys spending time with his family. He is an avid outdoorsman and enjoys hunting, fishing and working on his farm to improve wildlife habitat.


Daedra Powers, Registered Dental Hygienist 

Hi! I'm Daedra (pronounced Day-dra) and I have been a hygienist for Dr. Gardner since 2012. I always knew I wanted to be involved in a dental office as I had loved going to the dentist as a kid. I graduated with a degree in dental hygiene from NCMC. You will find me behind the scenes cleaning teeth and making people smile. 

When I'm not at work, you can find me running around St. Joseph with my husband, Brad, and our little boy, Carter. We enjoy cheering on the Chiefs and Royals, being outside, traveling and watching Carter play t-ball. 


Hanna Strough, Certified Dental Assistant, Expanded Functions

Hanna

Hi, I’m Hanna. I was born and raised in Skidmore, MO. I joined Dr. Gardner’s team in 2011 and instantly fell in love with Dental Assisting. I never dreamed I would enjoy educating patients on their teeth, but I love it! I am a Certified Dental Assistant with expanded functions in fixed and removable prosthetics. 

When I am not at the office you can usually find me with my two beautiful daughters Taylor and Chloe. We love to spend our time outdoors being active. I am excited to see Gardner Family Dentistry expand and grow with the community. Hope to see you all in the near future! 


Danielle Guthrie, Registered Dental Hygienist

Danielle

Hi! I'm Danielle, one of Dr. Gardner's Registered Dental Hygienists! I grew up in Bedford, IA and graduated from Bedford High School. After high school, I attended Des Moines Area Community College where I took my general education courses to get into the hygiene program. During my waiting period of getting into the program, I was a dental assistant for 2 years. I graduated in May of 2016 and I practiced in Iowa until starting with Dr. Gardner in October 2016.

I had the pleasure of marrying my husband Jason, in March 2017 and we welcomed our daughter in March 2018 named Blaire. We are expecting a baby boy in October of 2021. When I'm not working, I enjoy hanging out with my husband and chasing around my little girl! Gardner Family Dentistry is a great place to work and we have a great team of dental professionals. I hope to meet you soon and be able to help with your overall oral health.


Darchelle Gardner, Office Manager

Hi! My name is Darchelle. I wear many hats in the office including Office Manager, Dr. Gardner's wife, and "Office Mom". After 22 years as a cardiac nurse, I made the decision to join Jeff in the office. I am usually up in front answering phones and I have come to enjoy the title of "Director of First Impressons"! After 22 years of direct patient care, I do enjoy assisting in the back as well.

Darc

In my spare time, I enjoy visiting Alex at Mizzou and cooking his favorite meals when he comes home. Katie and I like to try our hand at new recipes, which we test out on the office staff. Our family enjoys spending time at our farm with our two dogs: Jag, the Brittany and Willow, who is a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. We also enjoy traveling as a family and visiting new destinations.

Jeff and I feel passionately about the organizations that we support including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Countryside Christian Church, Missouri Mission of Mercy (MOMOM) and the Belize Mission Project. Each year we make it a point to close the office to attend MOMOM and donate our time to provide free dental care to those in need. In October of 2018, Katie and I were blessed to be able to go on the Belize Mission Project where we were part of a team that provided dental services including restorations, extractions, and preventative care to the under-served people of Belize.

I enjoy working in the office, visiting with people, and being witness to Dr. Gardner and the staff provide exceptional patient care. Please make sure to say hi when you're in the office!


Brooke Ramsey, Certified Dental Assistant, Expanded Functions

Hi! My name is Brooke. I am one of the Dental Assistants here at Gardner Family Dentistry. I recently completed my dental assisting certification and have my expanded functions in removable prosthetics and fixed prosthetics! I have a true passion for dentistry; I enjoy educating patients about their teeth and I enjoy helping patients love their smile! It is rewarding to be able to build relationships with patients while helping them achieve their perfect smile! When I am not assisting Dr. Gardner you can find me at the front desk working to help you make the most of your insurance benefits, coordinating patient care, and getting to know each patient. 

I grew up in Fairfax, MO and moved to Maryville in 2008. I married my amazing husband, Cory, in June of 2016 and welcomed our son, Kellyn in June of 2019! Our little family just recently moved back to my husband's stomping grounds in good ol' Rea, MO! Outside of work, I enjoy spending time with friends and family. I also enjoy traveling and spending time outdoors, mainly playing sports or cheering on the Royals and Chiefs! I look forward to meeting you soon!


Abby Hoscheid, Dental Assistant 

absHi! My name is Abby. I was raised in a small town called Cherry, in Northern Illinois. After high school, I attended IVCC to complete my Associate's Degree and Expanded Functions Dental Assistant Certification. I now reside in Bedford, IA with my boyfriend, Jake. When I have some free time, I enjoy watching movies or taking trips with Jake on his motorcycle. 

Since middle school I knew I wanted to be a part of the dental world and help people get the smile they deserve. 

I joined Dr. Gardner's team in February of 2021. I enjoy meeting each and every one of you that makes this community so great! I hope to see you soon! 


Courtney Blackford,  Front Office Rockstar

Court

Hi! My name is Courtney. I was born and raised here in Maryville, so I bleed green! After high school I attended Highland Community College where I obtained my Associate of Arts Degree. I am excited to be working up front at Gardner Family Dentistry. I look forward to getting to know each patient and helping in anyway that I can!

When I am not at work, you can find me hanging out with my family. I have been married to my husband, Tim, for 20 years this September. We have 2 sons, Andrew and Aydan. Andrew graduated high school in May and is attending North Central Missouri College this fall. Aydan will be a sophomore at North Nodaway High School this year.

In my free time I enjoy reading, walking, scrapbooking, watching my boys play sports, as well as spending time with family and friends. 


Jordan Jones,  Registered Dental Hygienist 

Jordan

Hi all! My name is Jordan. I am a Registered Dental Hygienist here at Gardner Family Dental. I grew up in Sioux Falls, SD before attending the University of Nebraska. Go Big Red! From there I received my bachelors in Dental Hygiene from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. 

I moved to Maryville in 2019, and have come to learn what an amazing community I serve! The favorite part of my job is connecting with my patients, and fostering relationships. I cannot wait to meet you at your next appointment! 

When I’m not at working I am busy planning my upcoming wedding to my amazing fiancé Ryan, attending any and all Bearcat sporting events, golfing or baking!

Источник: https://www.maryvillesmiles.com/staff

Who Accredits NCMC - Accreditation

Council on Occupational EducationPre-AccreditedEstimated9/14/2013 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedEstimated1/1/1983 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual4/24/2009 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/27/2001 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/26/1985 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/23/2018 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/31/2017 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/23/2018 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual1/23/2014 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual4/3/2019 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual8/26/1985 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual7/18/2011 - CurrentHigher Learning CommissionAccreditedActual5/23/2012 - Current
Источник: https://www.univstats.com/colleges/north-central-missouri-college/accreditation/
north central missouri college dental hygienist missouri

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