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Chase bank security breach 2018


chase bank security breach 2018

More than 83 million of the bank's customers had data stolen in the breach [17]. Europe. 2015: “The RBS banking group has revealed it suffered a cyber-attack on. Data breaches are a serious problem in the banking sector. A recent cyberattack in India in 2018 took place in Cosmos bank when hackers. In fact, the most recent financial services data breach at In 2014, JPMorgan Chase, the largest U.S. bank, reported a data breach that.

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chase bank security breach 2018

Justice News

JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPMorgan), a Bankwest closing branches York, New York-based global banking and financial services firm, has entered into a resolution with the Department of Justice to resolve criminal charges related to two distinct schemes to defraud: the first involving tens of thousands of episodes of unlawful trading in the markets for precious metals futures contracts, and the second involving thousands of episodes of unlawful trading in the markets for U.S. Treasury futures contracts and in the secondary (cash) market for U.S. Treasury notes and bonds.

JPMorgan entered into a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA) in connection with a criminal information filed today in the District of Connecticut charging the company with two counts of wire fraud.  Under the terms of the DPA, JPMorgan will pay over $920 million in a criminal monetary penalty, criminal disgorgement, and victim compensation, with the criminal monetary penalty credited against payments made to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) under a separate agreement with the CFTC being announced today and with part of the criminal disgorgement credited against payments made to the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) under a separate agreement with the SEC being announced today.

“For over eight years, traders on JP Morgan’s precious metals and U.S. Treasuries desks engaged in separate schemes to defraud other market participants that involved thousands of instances of unlawful trading meant to enhance profits and avoid losses,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division.  “Today’s resolution — which includes a significant criminal monetary penalty, compensation for victims, and requires JP Morgan to disgorge its unlawful gains — reflects the nature and seriousness of the bank’s offenses and represents a milestone in the department’s ongoing efforts to ensure the integrity of public markets critical to our financial system.”    

“JPMorgan engaged in two separate years-long market manipulation schemes,” said U.S. Attorney John H. Durham of the District of Connecticut.  “Not only will the company pay a substantial financial penalty and return money to victims, but this agreement requires JPMorgan to self-report violations of the federal anti-fraud laws and cooperate in any future criminal investigations.  I thank the FBI for its dedication in investigating these deceptive trading practices and other sophisticated financial crimes.”

“For nearly a decade, a significant number of JP Morgan traders and sales personnel openly disregarded U.S. laws that serve to protect against illegal activity in the marketplace,” said Assistant Director in Charge William F. Sweeney Jr. of the FBI’s New York Field Office.  “Today's deferred prosecution agreement, in which JP Morgan Chase and Co. agreed to pay nearly one billion dollars in penalties and victim compensation, is a stark reminder to others that allegations of this nature will be aggressively investigated and pursued.”

According to admissions and court documents, between approximately March 2008 and August 2016, numerous traders and sales personnel on JPMorgan’s precious metals desk located in New York, London, and Singapore engaged in a scheme to defraud in connection with the purchase and sale of gold, silver, platinum, and palladium futures contracts (collectively, precious metals futures contracts) that traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange Inc. and Commodity Exchange Inc., which are commodities exchanges operated by the CME Group Inc.  In tens of thousands of instances, traders on the precious metals desk placed orders to buy and sell precious metals futures contracts with the intent to cancel those orders before execution, including in an attempt to profit by deceiving other market participants through injecting false and misleading information concerning the existence of genuine supply and demand for precious metals futures contracts.  In addition, on certain occasions, traders on the precious metals desk engaged in trading activity that was intended to deliberately trigger or defend barrier options held by JPMorgan and thereby avoid losses.

One of the traders on the precious metals desk, John Edmonds, 38, of Brooklyn, New York, pleaded guilty on Oct. 9, 2018, to one count of commodities fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, commodities fraud, commodities price manipulation, and spoofing, and his sentencing, at this time, has not been scheduled before U.S. District Judge Robert N. Chatigny of the District of Connecticut.  Another one of the traders on the precious metals desk, Christian Trunz, 35, of New York, New York, pleaded guilty on Aug. 20, 2019, to one count of conspiracy to engage in spoofing and one count of spoofing in connection with his precious metals futures contracts trading at JPMorgan and another financial services firm, and his sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 28, 2021, before U.S. District Judge Sterling Johnson of the Eastern F train line of New York. 

Finally, as part of the investigation, the department obtained a superseding indictment on Nov. 15, 2019 against three former JPMorgan traders, Gregg Smith, Michael Nowak, and Christopher Jordan, and one former salesperson, Jeffrey Ruffo, in the Northern District of Illinois that charged them for their alleged participation in a racketeering conspiracy and other federal crimes in connection with the manipulation of the precious metals futures contracts markets.  An indictment is merely an allegation and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

Also according to admissions and court documents, between approximately April 2008 and January 2016, traders on JPMorgan’s U.S. Treasuries desk located in New York and London engaged in a scheme to defraud in connection with the purchase and sale of U.S. Treasury futures contracts that traded on the Chicago Board of Trade, which is a commodities exchange operated by the CME Group Inc., and of U.S. Treasury notes and bonds traded in the secondary cash market (the U.S. Treasury futures, notes, and bonds, collectively, U.S. Treasury Products).  In thousands of instances, traders on the U.S. Treasuries desk placed orders to roslyn savings bank east meadow and sell U.S. Treasury Products with the intent to cancel those orders before execution, including in an attempt to profit by deceiving other market participants through injecting false and misleading information concerning the existence of genuine supply and demand for U.S. Treasury Products.

As part of the DPA, JPMorgan, and its subsidiaries JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. (JPMC) and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC (JPMS) have agreed to, among other things, continue to cooperate with the Fraud Section and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Connecticut in any ongoing or future investigations and prosecutions concerning JPMorgan, JPMC, JPMS, and their subsidiaries and affiliates, and their officers, directors, employees and agents.  As part of its cooperation,  JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS are required to report evidence or allegations of conduct which may constitute a violation of the wire fraud statute, the anti-fraud, anti-spoofing and/or anti-manipulation provisions of the Commodity Exchange Act, the securities and commodities fraud statute, and federal securities laws prohibiting manipulative and deceptive devices.  In addition, JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS have also agreed to enhance their compliance program where necessary and appropriate, and to report to the government regarding remediation and implementation of their enhanced compliance program.

The department reached this resolution with JPMorgan based on a number of factors, including the nature and seriousness of the offense conduct, which spanned eight years and involved tens of thousands of instances of unlawful trading activity; JPMorgan’s failure to fully and voluntarily self‑disclose the offense conduct to the department; JPMorgan’s prior criminal history, including a guilty plea on May 20, 2015, for similar misconduct involving manipulative and deceptive trading practices in the foreign currency exchange spot market (FX Guilty Plea); and the fact that substantially all of the offense conduct occurred prior to the FX Guilty Plea. 

JPMorgan received credit for its cooperation with the department’s investigation and for the remedial measures taken by JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS, including suspending and ultimately terminating individuals involved in the offense conduct, adopting heightened internal controls, and substantially increasing the resources devoted to compliance.  Significantly, since the time of the offense conduct, and following the FX Guilty Plea, JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS engaged in a systematic effort to reassess and enhance their market conduct compliance program and internal controls.  These enhancements included hiring hundreds of new compliance officers, improving their anti-fraud and manipulation training and policies, revising their trade and electronic communications surveillance programs, implementing tools and processes to facilitate closer supervision of traders, taking into account employees’ commitment to compliance in promotion and compensation decisions, and implementing independent quality assurance testing of non-escalated and escalated surveillance alerts.  Based on JPMorgan’s, JPMC’s and JPMS’ how to use cash app without cash card and the state of their compliance program, the department determined that an independent compliance monitor was unnecessary. 

Today, the CFTC announced a separate settlement with JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS in connection with a related, parallel proceeding.  Under the terms of that resolution, JPMorgan agreed to pay approximately $920 million, which includes a civil monetary penalty of approximately $436 million, as well as restitution and disgorgement that will be credited to any such payments made to the department under the DPA.  Also, the SEC announced today a separate settlement with JPMS in connection with a related, parallel proceeding regarding trading activity in the secondary cash market for U.S. Treasury notes and bonds.  Under the terms of that resolution, JPMS agreed to pay $10 million in disgorgement and a civil monetary penalty of $25 million.

The FBI’s New York Field Office investigated this case.  Assistant Chief Avi Perry and Trial Attorney Matthew F. Sullivan of the Fraud Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Jonathan Francis of the District of Connecticut prosecuted the case.  

Individuals who believe that they may be a victim in this case should visit the Fraud Section’s Victim Witness website at https://www.justice.gov/criminal-vns/case/jpmorgan-dpa or call (888) 549-3945.

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice.  Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

Источник: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/jpmorgan-chase-co-agrees-pay-920-million-connection-schemes-defraud-precious-metals-and-us
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Full Transcript

Shadow of 3 men walking

This is the story about how someone hacked into JP Morgan Chase, one of the biggest financial institutions in the world. It’s obvious why someone would want to break into a bank right? Well the people who hacked chase bank security breach 2018 this bank, did not do it for obvious reasons. The hackers are best described as knaves. Which are tricky, deceitful fellows.

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  • The Long Game: How Hackers Spent Months Pulling Back Data From JP Morgan
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  • Affactive/Revenjet Online Gambling Boss to Pay $403 to Resolve Federal Charges
  • United States of America v. Anthony R. Murgio et al
  • United States of America v. Anthony R. Murgio et al
  • Top Lieutenant of Dimon is Departing JP Morgan
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  • Obama Had Security Fears on JPMorgan Data Breach
  • Luck Played Role in Discovery of Data Breach at JP Morgan Affecting Millions
  • Neglected server provided entry for JPMorgan hackers
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  • US Securities and Exchange Commission
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  • JP Morgan Hackers Hit Boston Mutual Fund and 13 Other Firms
  • Russian Hacker Pleads Guilty For Involvement In Massive Network Intrusions At U.S. Russian Hacker Brought To The USA to Face Trial
  • All About Binary Options and Why They Are Replaced by Cryptos
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  • The Wolf of Sofia and his Cybercrime Network [Part 1 - Introduction]
  • JP Morgan hack – Gery Shalon’s co-conspirator Andrei Tyurin pleaded guilty to big-style financial crime
  • Broker Scam Investigations in Germany – Names of Suspects disclosed
  • Gery Shalon’s international cybercrime enterprise and its european-russian connections
  • Scottrade Data Breach Affects Millions of Customers
  • Russian Hacker Will Plead Guilty for Role in JP Morgan Cyber-Attack
  • Russian Hacker Involved in Gambling Scams Extradited by the US
  • The JP Morgan Chase Data Breach: Whose Job is it to Secure Americans Financial Information?
  • The Heartbleed Bug
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  • Memo Endorsement as to Ziv Orenstein - Letter Motion
  • Memo Endorsement as to Ziv Orenstein - Consent Letter Motion
  • Memo Endorsement as to Andrei Tyurin - Consent Letter Motion
  • Azeri Banks Corner Fake AV, Pharma Market
  • Arrests in JP Morgan, eTrade, Scottrade Hacks
  • JP Morgan Hackers Breached Anti-Fraud Vendor G2 Web Services
  • Win7 - IDPay Partial Domains List
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  • Good Question: How Often Do Hackers Get Caught?
  • Heartbleed Bug: What You Need To Know
  • JPMorgan hacker fugitive arrested at JFK
  • Three Indicted for Massive Hack and Fraud Scheme that Targeted JP Morgan
  • Russian Pleads Guilty in Massive JPMorgan Hacking Scheme
  • Gery Shalon Leaves Prison After Agreeing Plea Deal
  • Two Israelis and an American Busted in Largest-Ever Heist of Customers’ Bank Data
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  • Report: Spammers Tied to JPMorgan Chase Hack
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  • Russia Facing Recession as Sanctions Likely To Intensify
  • US, EU Escalate Russia Sanctions as Putin Holds Firm
  • FBI Said to Examine Whether Russia Tied to JPMorgan Hacking
  • JPMorgan Hack Said to Span Months Via Multiple Flaws
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  • JPMorgan Goes To War
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  • Million: Israeli Will Pay $403 Record Fine To US
  • Rogue Online Casinos, Blacklist and Warnings
  • Rogue Affactive and RevenueJet Group Casinos Shut Down, Owners in Custody
  • Why $250M Didn’t Protect JPMorgan From Hackers
  • Why The Crimean Referendum is Illegitimate
  • JP Morgan Found Hackers Through Breach of Corporate Event Website: Media
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  • Company-Histories: Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc
  • United States v Shalon (1:15-cr-00333) Docket Record
  • United States of America v. Andrei Tyurin
  • U.S. extradites Russian accused in hack of JPMorgan Chase
  • Mystery Fingers on Keyboard in JPMorgan Hack
  • Chase Breach: Who Else Was Attacked?
  • What lies behind the JPMorgan Chase cyber-attack
  • Manhattan U.S. Attorney Announces Charges Against Three Defendants in Multi-Million-Dollar Stock Manipulation Scheme
  • Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Assistant Director in Charge Diego G. Rodriguez Regarding Charges Stemming from Massive Network Intrusions
  • Israeli Media: JPMorgan Hack Perpetrator to Pay $403 Million to US Authorities
  • Hacking as a business model
  • Rogue Casino Group Affactive Linked to ‘Pump-and-Dump’ Arrests
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  • Why J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. Is Spending A Half Billion Dollars On Cybersecurity
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  • Why Do a Reverse Merger Instead of an IPO?
  • United States of America v Gery Shalon, Joshua Samuel Aaron & Ziv Orenstein
  • Attorney General and Manhattan U.S. Attorney Announce Charges Stemming from Massive Network Intrusions at U.S. Financial Institutions, U.S. Brokerage Firms, Major News Publications and Other Companies
  • United States of America v Gery Shalon, Joshua Samuel Aaron & John Doe
  • Manhattan U.S. Attorney Announces Extradition Of Alleged Russian Hacker Responsible For Massive Network Intrusions At U.S. Financial Institutions, Brokerage Firms, A Major News Publication, And Other Companies
  • Manhattan U.S. Attorney Announces Extradition Of Defendants Linked To Massive Network Intrusions At U.S. Financial Institutions, U.S. Brokerage Firms, A Major News Publication, And Other Companies In Furtherance Of Securities Fraud Scheme And Other Crimes
  • Russian Hacker Pleads Guilty For Involvement In Massive Network Intrusions At U.S. Financial Institutions, Brokerage Firms, A Major News Publication, And Other Companies
  • New Rival Casinos 2020 - About Rival Gaming
  • Russian Hackers Amass Over a Billion Internet Passwords
  • JPMorgan and Other Banks Struck by Hackers
  • After Breach, JPMorgan Still Seeks to Determine Extent of Attack
  • Authorities Closing In on Hackers Who Stole Data From JPMorgan Chase
  • 5 Men, 2 Fraud Schemes and a Possible Link to JPMorgan Chase Hacking
  • U.S. Extends Investigation of JPMorgan Chase Hacking
  • Russia Turns Over American Cybertheft Suspect to the U.S.
  • Russian Man Pleads Guilty in ‘Massive’ Hacking Scheme
  • How To Set Up A Shell Company
  • U.S. Letter to Israel on Fraud Schemes
  • Government’s Forteiture Bill of Particulars - Gery Shalon, Joshua Samuel Aaron & Ziv Orenstein
  • FBI has lead in probe of 1.2 bln stolen Web credentials - documents
  • Hired-gun hacking played key role in JPMorgan, Fidelity breaches
  • Minimizing Damage From J.P. Morgan’s Data Breach
  • Shneier On Security - Heartbleed
  • US Securities and Exchange Commission, JP Morgan Chase & Co, Form 8-k Breach Disclosure Report
  • JP Morgan Chase Cybersecurity: ‘We Spend Nearly $600 a Year’
  • JP Morgan Chase & Co Risk Assessment Report Based on the 2014 Data Breach
  • Why The JP Morgan Data Breach Is Like No Other
  • JP Morgan Chase Reveals Massive Data Breach Affecting 76m Households
  • JPMorgan Chase: 76 milliom homes, 7 million small biz thumped in cyber-heist
  • JPMorgan CYBER-HEIST: 9 US financial firms snared by ‘Russian hackers’, says report
  • JPMorgan Chase mega-hack was a simple two-factor auth fail
  • We finally got one! Russion ‘fesses up to cracking bank servers, netting big bucks
  • JP Morgan hit by largest hack of customer data
  • Jewish, Israeli Bank Hackers Bragged of Plans, Exploits
  • Shell Corporation: Everything You Need To Know
  • Sentencing Of Russian National Tyurin Accused Of Hacking In US Rescheduled For May 19
  • The 2014 US and World Populations
  • JPMorgan Chase Compliance Chief Saif To Leave For First Data
  • US Extradites Russian Hacker Connected To Affactive/Netad Management Scam Sites
  • JP Morgan Breach Raises Alarm About Safety of Financial System
  • E-Trade Notifies 31’000 Customers That Their Contact Info May Have Been Breached in 2013 Hack
  • Feds arrest final suspect in JPMorgan Chase hack, considered largest ever
  • Maryland man suspected of largest-ever bank hack arrested in Russia: Report
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  • What Happened to Scottrade?
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Darknet Diaries is created by Jack Rhysider.

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Transcript

[START OF RECORDING] JACK: To build a successful business, you need a good business plan; a carefully thought-out, step-by-step guide to launch, develop, and expand. You need good people too, people you trust and can rely on. But the internet has changed how people become entrepreneurs. It’s made it easier to find good help and easier to find customers. Digital technology and the internet have created a whole range of new opportunities for businesses and entrepreneurs. But there’s a flip-side to these innovations, a darker side. You see, the criminal underworld has also benefited from the explosion of digital technology and the internet. Criminals make business plans, too. They build networks and work together to advance their elicit agendas.

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Источник: https://darknetdiaries.com/episode/76/

Pittsburgh Area Residents Still Receiving Chase Bank Cards They Did Not Sign Up For

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – More people in the Pittsburgh area have become victims of identity theft involving Chase Bank checking accounts and local police are trying to figure out who is using residents’ personal information to open accounts.

“It was scary, it was so scary,” Rosemary Dubyak said.

READ MORE: COVID-19 In Pennsylvania: State Reports Over 10,000 New Cases

Rosemary Dubyak is still baffled after her husband, Andrew, got a Chase Bank debit card in the mail for an account he didn’t open. She said they weren’t sure what to do until they saw KDKA’s news story on Wednesday about the recent identity fraud.

The Pleasant Hills couple spent hours taking the necessary precautions like freezing his credit, calling Chase Bank and police. Two days later, they received three more Chase debit cards in the mail.

“I was just physically sick when we got three more because then I thought this isn’t over and why did it happen, how did it happen,” Dubyak said.

Police departments all around the Pittsburgh area are getting reports of this fraud.

The Peters Township Police Department has had over 25 cases. They are creating a task force along with the South Hills Area Council of Governments (SHACOG) to investigate and attempt to identify the individuals responsible. They requested assistance from the United States Secret Service.

Watch as KDKA’s Chris Hoffman reports:

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“We’re trying to put a task force together with all the local departments. There are hundreds of identity thefts occurring through Chase Bank. We’re also requesting assistance from the United States Secret Service,” said Corporal Lou Reda with the Peters Township Police Department.

Police said personal information is being used to create accounts because of a recent Chase Bank offer. Chase offers $200 if you open a new checking account and set up direct deposits.

“Right now, we’re not really sure whose been opening these accounts. It’s been hundreds. Somewhere there was a breach of personal information. The credit cards are coming with victims’ names, going to their address,es and actually using a social security number to open the accounts,” said Corporal Reda.

Dubyak said when they called Chase Bank about the three new cards sent to them, they were told the accounts were closed but she still has lots of questions.

“What bothered me is that there are no checks and balances in place to put up a red flag when it occurred,” Dubyak said.

Dubyak hopes someone will find the answers.

“42 years we’ve been married. We’ve shredded everything and been so careful with our information and someone got it. I want them to find who did it and how it happened,” Dubyak said.

If this happens you believe you are a victim of this: contact your local police department, make a report and obtain an incident number then call Chase Bank and demand the account be closed due to fraud.

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Police said you should also contact all three credit bureaus to put a watch on your credit history and report this as identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission.

Источник: https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2021/03/07/chase-bank-card-fraud-continues/

Data Breach Weekly Security Report: Which company lost control of your details this week

Welcome to GearBrain's Weekly Data Breach Report, a collection of known breaches into company databases where someone you don't know got access to your personal information. The frequency at which these break-ins gpa requirements for south carolina state university appears to be growing, so every week we'll update our report with fresh news on the latest hacks and links on where you can go if there's action to be taken — whether you're concerned about your privacy or not.

This week we're looking at a data breach at clothing maker Guess, another at a dermatology company that may have affected 2.4 million people, and a new $10 million award from the White House to thwart ransomware.

Read More:

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Guess

Guess jeans

Guess has admitted to a data breach

iStock/Getty Images

Clothing maker Guess has said that it was breached, with hackers making off with driver's license numbers, passport details, Social Security numbers and more, according to Bleeping Computer. The breach happened between Feb 2, 2021 and Feb 23, 2021. Some people, affected, have been sent letters about the breach which the company reportedly started mailing out on June 9.

Forefront Dermatology

electronic medical records

A healthcare company based in Wisconsin has reported a data breach

iStock/Getty Images

A Wisconsin-based healthcare company, Forefront Dermatology, has stated that its network had a breach that may have allowed access to personal details including patient names, dates of birth and even their medical treatment information, according to PortSwigger. An estimated 2.4 million people may have been affected.

$10 million ransomware awards

White House

The White House has created a $10 million award for information about ransomware

iStock/Getty Images

The White House is going to start offering rewards to those who can supply information about cyber crimes, including ransomware, that are being leveled against the U.S. companies and infrastructure, according to the Associated Press. The reward will be upwards of $10 million, and it's part of a new push by the Biden administration to help thwart attacks before they even begin. This includes a new web site, stopransomware.gov, that is a guide educating people about ransomware and how they can better protect themselves against this kind of attack and get help if they are affected.

Week of July 5, 2021: Kaseya

Computer hack

The hackers are demanding a $70M ransom

Getty Images/iStock

This week saw a ransomware attack on a Florida-based information technology firm, which saw the seizure of masses of data and the demand of a $70M ransom payment.

Claimed to be one of the largest ransomware attacks of all time, the event affected hundreds of businesses worldwide, from supermarkets in Sweden to schools in New Zealand, reports the Guardian. Generally speaking, Kaseya's services were used by companies too small to have their own IT departments, and it was systems used to protect customers from malicious software that were attacked. It is estimated that between 800 and 1,500 small businesses were affected by the incident, which saw their data accessed by ransomware hackers.

Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

The attack affected Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

iStock

Next up, we have an incident that took place at the Northwestern Memorial HealthCare (NMHC). A data breach by Elekta, at a third-party provider used by NMHC has potentially exposed patient information, including patient names, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, health insurance information and medical record numbers.

The Chicago-based healthcare provider said: "On May 17, 2021, Elekta informed us that an unauthorized individual gained access to its systems between April 2, 2021 and April chase bank security breach 2018, 2021 and, during that time, acquired a copy of the database that stores some oncology patient information."

Financial account and payment card information was not involved, NMHC said, adding that the incident "did not involve access NMHC's systems, network, or electronic health records."

Morgan Stanley

The attack affected the server of a third-party vendor used by Morgan Stanley

iStock

Finally this week, investment banking firm Morgan Stanley reported a data breach after attackers stole customer information during an chase bank security breach 2018 on the Accellion FTA server of a third-party vendor. Morgan Stanley was notified by Guidehouse, a provider of account maintenance services, in May 2021 that its Accellion FTA server had been compromised.

Morgan Stanley said in a letter: "There was no data security breach of any Morgan Stanley applications. The incident involves files which were in Guidehouse's possession, including encrypted files from Morgan Stanley."

It is good news that the data is encrypted, but the stolen trove still contains stock plan participants' names, addresses, dates of birth, Social Security numbers and corporate company names.

Week of June 28, 2021: Linked In tfcu com online banking

LinkedIn

Data from LinkedIn is reportedly up for sale on a hacker site

iStock/Getty Images

Data from 92 percent of LinkedIn users is reportedly for sale, according to Privacy Sharks, a VPN review site, which found 700 million records from LinkedIn on a hacker forum.

The data includes details from email addresses to gender, names and phone numbers. But LinkedIn told the news site that the details did not come from a data breach and did not include private details from LinkedIn members.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz reported that some customer data was left exposed on a cloud platform

iStock/Getty Images

Carmaker Mercedes-Benz found that data on some customers and potential buyers was left open on a cloud platform, the company stated. The details of the data included in some cases of self-reported credit scores, credit card information, birth dates, social security numbers and some drivers clines numbers. But they affected fewer than 1,000 people and was information they had entered on to dealer and Mercedes-Benz websites between January 1, 2014 and June 19, 2017.

Herff Jones

Herff Jones

Herff Jones found "suspicious activity" around payment card details

iStock/Getty Images

Yearbook supplier Herff Jones is getting in touch with customers about a breach that may have affected their payment card details. The company found about what they called "suspicious activity" in May, and began investigating finding "theft of certain customers' payment information."

Anyone who believes they've been affected can reach out to the company through its web site, and can Herff Jones is also offering free credit monitoring.

Week of June 21, 2021: Office 365 malware phish

Microsoft is warning people that a group is tricking Office 365 users into downloading a malware Excel file that then gives them a back door into someone's Windows device, reports ZDNet. The initial reach comes via email telling people that they have already downloaded a free version of software and unless they call they will be forced to start paying. This prompts people to place a call to the number in the email.

The malware itself is said to be used to push out ransomware, and Microsoft's own security team is now tracking the malware as well.

Illinois Department of Transportation warns of phish

The Illinois Department of Transportation is also warning people not to respond to emails claiming to be from their agency and asking for personal information, reports local news site 23WIFR. People are reporting that texts and emails are being sent — purporting to be from the DOT, and telling people to delete the messages and crucially not click on any link in them as well.

The agency has told people that they would never reach out through these avenues asking for personal information such as Social Security numbers or even banking account details.

Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training

Over in Rhode Island, the state's Department of Labor and Training is also warning people about email phishes as well, reports local news channel 10WJAR. The emails are asking people to verify their professional license — not something the agency says it would ask people in this manner either.

Their advice? Delete the email without clicking on any links.

Week of June 14, 2021: Wegmans

Wegmans, a chain of grocery stores, has had a data breach that the company says may have left data available for people to find including their home and email addresses, chase bank security breach 2018 numbers, their Shoppers Club numbers, birthdates dates ameris bank personal online banking login more.

The details also included passwords to shoppers accounts on Wegman's web site, but the company said these were hashed and salted and therefore the characters were not visible.

Wegmans was alerted to the breach by a third-party security researcher and it confirmed the issue on its own on April 19, 2021. They're suggesting people change the passwords on their Wegmans' accounts.

CVS

More than one billion search records done on CVS Pharmacy's web site were available online — and left visible — this spring, according to ABC News, which credits a cybersecurity researcher, Jeremiah Fowler, with finding the issue.

The records are chemical bank online services to terms people were searching for on CVS Pharmacy's web site, and Fowler found the breach in March, notifying the company. These details include information people were looking for on Covid-19 vaccines, and Fowler said in some instances people put in their email address into the search — which was visible in the records.

CVS admitted to ABC News that the search information was connected to them. They added the breach stemmed from a third-party vendor which had been hosting the information, and that CVS has now shut down that database.

Alibaba

Online shopping site Alibaba was hit with a data leak, which grabbed about 1.1 billion details from users, according the The Wall Street Journal. The data included user names and mobile phone numbers and was grabbed through a crawler, a program that reads through data details, according to news accounts.

The crawler reportedly came from an affiliate marketing outlet, and was taken from Alibaba's shopping outlet Taobao over a period of several months, while Alibaba itself was not made aware of the details until July 2020.

Week of June 7, 2021: Beef supplier JBS

JBS, a supplier of beef to customers worldwide, paid out nearly $11 million in bitcoin to hackers after a ransomware attack shut down its plants in the U.S. and Australia.

Ransomware attacks are a way for hackers to hold a company's data, demanding payment before it's released. A recent ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline caused a shut down along the East Coast before the company paid out $4.4 million. Much of that money was recovered by the Justice Department.

Arnoff Moving & Storage

An East Coast-based moving company Arnoff Moving & Storage has been reportedly hacked, with its data held for ransomware. The details the hackers claim to have in their possession include customer payments, as well as a subcontractor's W-9 which includes tax identification.

NYC Law Department

The New York City Law Department was hacked freezing employees's access into their accounts. The department includes lawyers who serve the city on issues ranging from real estate leases to acting as legal counsel for city officials.

Both the FBI and the New York Police Department are involved trying to investigate what happened — and where to go from there. The shut down, which was first detected Saturday night, had been continuing into the week.

Week of May 31: Klarna

Klarna users reported this week how they were being mistakenly logged out, then greeted with the accounts of others when logging back in. A buy-now-pay-later company, and Europe's largest private fintec company, Klarna is reportedly close to securing a deal that would value the firm at $40bn.

The information greeting customers included randomized postal chase bank bank name and past purchases, as well as partial bank card details, of other users. One user tweeted four screenshots to demonstrate how they were shown a different user each time they logged in. Klarna issued a statement on June 2 to say the issue was not the result of an external attack, and said a maximum of 9,500 customers were affected, having previously pegged that figure at 90,000.

AMT Games

A claimed 1.47TB of data, including personal details belonging to 5.9 million people, has emerged online, feely accessible without encryption or a password. The data, which includes email addresses, IP addresses, Facebook data and more, belongs to customers of AMT Games, a mobile and browser game developer based in China.

Discovered by security researchers from WizCase, the data numbers in the millions and was accessible to anyone who had the link to its location online, WizCase chase bank security breach 2018, adding that the link has since been secured but without a response from AMT Games. Titles produced by the company include Battle For The Galaxy and Heroes of War.

WizCase said the database "leaked approximately 5.9 million player profiles, two million transactions and 587,000 feedback messages. Feedback message data contained account ID, feedback rating given and users' email addresses."

Scripps

Scripps, a healthcare provider in California, informed more than 147,000 people this week that their personal data may have been exposed to a recent cyberattack. The company took parts of its network offline after a ransomware attack was discovered in early May, leading to four weeks of disruption to patient appointments.

Data that may have been exposed by the attack include health information, social security numbers, driver's license numbers and financial information, Infosecurity Magazine reported.

Scripps told patients this week: "Importantly, this incident did not result in unauthorized access to Scripps' electronic medical record application, Epic. However, health information and personal financial information was acquired through other documents stored on our network.For the less than 2.5 percent of individuals whose social security number and/or driver's license number were involved, we will be providing complimentary americas best eyeglasses tucson monitoring and identity protection support activities."

Week of May 24, 2021: Bose

Bose, maker of audio speakers, was hit by what the company refers to as a "sophisticated cyber-incident," that pushed ransomware into its U.S. systems, according to Bleeping Computer, which posted a letter from Bose to the Consumer Protection Bureau. Bose reported in the letter that it first became aware of the concern in March 2021, and then worked with "cyber experts," to figure out if data from its systems had been exposed.

The investigation found that data from six former employees in New Hampshire was "accessed," the company wrote, but consumer data is not mentioned.

New cybersecurity regulations

Following the ransomware attack that brought down the Colonial pipeline for days, impacting gas supplies across some of the East Coast, the Department of Homeland Security is now going to set up new rules that pipeline companies have to follow regarding cyber concerns, reports The Washington Post.

That means that there will be new systems in place — more than the current guidelines — these companies will have to follow regarding cyber concerns. They will also have new actions that they'll have to take if they're attacked as well, including notifying both the Transportation Security Administration and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.

Apple roslyn savings bank east meadow update

A new Apple update, macOS 11.4, did more than just push out ways to purchase Apple Podcasts to computers, it also addressed some important security concerns, ZDNet reports.

The new update includes a patch, a fix that addresses a vulnerability on the macOS that was allowing malware to work around privacy settings. The bug was allowing screenshots to be taken of someone's desktop, without needing permission, wrote ZDNet, quoting a Security firm Jamf's posting.

This only underscores why everyone needs to be updating their operating systems — whether on a computer, smartphone or other smart device — regularly, and automatically.

Week of May 17, 2021: Eufy Security

This week saw a major privacy blunder at Eufy Security, a maker of smart home devices, including indoor and outdoor security cameras. The incident, blamed by Eufy on a bug caused during a server update, saw over 700 customers able to view the live security camera feeds of other Eufy users. The incident lasted for approximately one hour and 40 minutes, and during that time users reported how they could view strangers' security cameras, and even record footage to their own smartphones using the Eufy Security app.

Users in the United States, New Zealand, Australia, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina were all affected. Eufy has apologized for the incident, saying: "We realize that as a security company we didn't do good enough. We are sorry we felt [sic] short here and are working on new security protocols and measures to make sure that this never happens again."

Read More:

Health Service Executive, Ireland

This week also saw the head of the Republic of Ireland's health service describe the "catastrophic" impact of a "stomach-churning" hack of its IT systems. Paul Reid, chief executive of Health Service Executives described the ransomware attack as a "callous act," which led to healthcare workers resorting to pen and paper while IT systems were recovered. A similar attack struck the Irish Department of Health a week earlier.

In scenes that echoed the Wannacry ransomware attack on the UK's National Health Service in 2017, many outpatient services were cancelled. Irish Prime Minister (Taoiseach) Micheál Martin told the BBC: "It's a shocking attack on a health service, but fundamentally on the patients and the Irish public."

The Financial Times reported how health records were being shared online – a claim Irish Communications Minister Eamon Ryan described as "very credible".

Verizon 2021 Data Breach Investigations Report

Lastly this week, Verizon published its annual Data Breach Investigations Report. Covering the last 12 months, the report analyzed 29,207 cybersecurity incidents, of which 5,258 were data breaches – a third more than the previous year. According to the report, which can be read chase bank security breach 2018 and summarised by Solutions Review here, phishing attacks increased by 11 percent since the previous year, while ransomware attacks rose by six percent.

Furthermore, a huge 85 percent of breaches involved a human elements, raising questions over the public's ability to spot a cybersecurity incident, and highlighting a lack of training and education on how cyberattacks take place. Four in five incidents were spotted by an outside party and not by the victim.

Week of May 10: Colonial Pipeline

Anyone living along the southeast coordinator of the United States, has likely seen or felt the impact of a reported ransomware attack that hit Colonial Pipeline. The company first reported the attack late last week, in early May, and had shut down its operations as result, which moves more than 100 million gallons of fuel across parts of the U.S., wrote CBS News. The company was able to restart the pipeline this week, on Wednesday, but has warned people that getting back up to speed with gasoline supplies to stations could take many more days.

Pennsylvania Covid-19 contract tracing

A breach of Covid-19 contract tracing details may have exposed private data of about 72,000 people, according to a statement from the Pennsylvania attorney general, and reported by the Associated Press. The information was stored with a contact tracing vendor, Insight Global, which has reportedly admitted that people working for it shared Information, including people's names who may have been exposed to Covid-19 as well as symptoms, among possibly other details, via Google accounts that were not authorized. Pennsylvania's Attorney General Josh Shapiro has stated his office is investigating

Microsoft 365

Egress, a software company that focuses on data breaches, has issued a security report, stating that it believes 85 percent of organizations that use Microsoft 365 have had an email data breach in the last 12 months. The report, Outbound Email: Microsoft 365's Security Blind Spot, noted that 15 percent of organizations that use Microsoft 365 had more than 500 data breach in the last year, as compared to just 4 percent of companies that had not used it.

The report was compiled from interviews with 500 IT leaders and 3,000 remote workers in the US and the UK in financial services, healthcare and legal.

Week of May 3, 2021: Peloton

It was revealed this week that, in January, security researcher Jen Masters, from Pen Test Partners, reported to Peloton how the up-market exercise bike had a data problem. Masters had discovered that it was possible for anyone to view the personal details of any Peloton user, even if they had their account set to private and had no friends on the exercise platform. Due to an API fault, it was possible to view any Peloton user's age, gender, city, weight and workout statistics.

Mistakes happen, but the bigger issue here was how Peloton did not respond to Masters and did not fix the problem within the industry-standard 90 days Masters gave the company before making his findings public. Peloton has since fixed the issue and apologised for its slow response. "We took action, and addressed the issues based on his initial submissions," Peloton said. "But we were slow to update the researcher about our remediation efforts. Going forward, we will do better to work collaboratively with the security research community and respond more promptly when vulnerabilities are reported."

You can roslyn savings bank east meadow more about this incident in a blog post on the Pen Test Partners website.

Amazon fake reviews scam

This is an interesting data breach, as the exposure of this data also shed light on an Amazon review scam. The exposed 7GB database contained over 13 millions records related to how an Amazon scam review system works. In a bid to gain 5-star reviews for products, sellers contact Amazon users, tell them which products to buy, then refund them the cost through PayPal once a positive, 5-star review has been posted to Amazon. The seller gets a 5-star review for their products, and the customer gets fully refunded for the items they buy.

The database potentially implicates more than 200,000 people in the scam, according to Safety Detectives, which discovered the database on an ElasticSearch server with no password or encryption. Exposed data includes the email addresses and phone numbers of vendors, as well as PayPal account details, email addresses and usernames of reviewers. Over 230,000 Gmail email addresses were also exposed by the unprotected server.

NHS

Finally this week, Britain's National Health Service website was found to exposed details on whether a citizen has had their Covid-19 vaccine or not. Discovered by the Guardian, the fault was found in an NHS website used to book vaccinations. The issue is how a person's vaccination status was exposed by the website to anyone who either new the persons's NHS number, or basic information about them. In theory, an employer could find out if someone had had their vaccine or not, with knowing only basic identity information about the person.

"This is a seriously shocking failure to protect patients' medical confidentiality at a time when it could not be more important," said Silkie Carlo, the director of privacy group Big Brother Watch. "This online system has left the population's Covid vaccine statuses exposed to absolutely anyone to pry into. Date of birth and postcode are fields of data that can be easily found or bought, even on the electoral roll."

chase bank security breach 2018 Week of April 26, 2021: DigitalOcean

DigitalOcean, a cloud-based firm for developers, is warning customers about a data breach that exposed information connected to their billing details. The company is stating that the error that allowed the hacker to get inside has been fixed, but over two weeks they were able to see people's names and addresses associated with their bills as well as the last four digits of any card used to pay their accounts as well, reports Tech Crunch.

DigitalOcean is a service that developers will tap to allow the to create and write programs, and have them stored in the company's cloud as they work. And while passwords were not involved in the breach, nor the actual DigitalOcean account, 1 percent of billing profiles were involved and also included expiration dates and the name of the bank that a payment card was connected to as well.

University of California first national bank online columbus ne

A data breach of University of California students' personal details is now showing up on the dark web, according to some students, including at least one alumna, themselves. Some of this information includes Social Security numbers, email and home addresses and also phone numbers, reports The Daily Californian.

The University of California was caught up in the Accellion cyberattack, which precipitated the loss of information of its own community. The UC system is offering a free year of credit monitoring, but some of those affected have raised concerns that this is not sufficient.

JPMorgan Chase Bank

A new phishing attack is making the rounds going after customers of JPMorgan Chase Bank. These phishing attempts are building off details found on social media — which appear to be posted by customers — and gleaning those pieces of information to better tune their attacks, reports Infosecurity Magazine.

One of the attacks actually claims to be a credit card statement, telling customers that their details can now be read. That link takes them to a fake web site, that looks like it's coming from Chase, and asks them to type in their user name and password. But the name of the bank is spelled slightly wrong, with a space between the JP and the Morgan, (which is wrong), and the letter "P"not capitalized.

People should take some time to make sure they're taking steps to try and protect themselves from phishing attacks.

Week of April 19, 2021: Apple

Apple was this week targeted by a $50 million ransomeware attack, after a trove of engineering and manufacturing schematics of its products were stolen from manufacturing partner Quanta. The Taiwanese company manufacturers MacBooks and other products for Apple and the stolen data related to current and future devices, The Record reported.

The leak was reportedly carried out by Russian hacking group REvil, which is also known as Sodinokibi. The stolen images were published online on April 20 to coincide with Apple's Spring Loaded product launch event, after Quanta refused to pay the $50m random demand. The hackers now hope that Apple will pay up, before more images are set to be leaked on May 1.

Douglas Elliman Property Management

Thousands of New York residents learned this month that they may have had their personal information compromised. The data breach stems from Douglas Elliman Property Management, whose three managing directors emailed hundreds of co-operative and condominium boards at the start of the week, advising them about phone number santander customer service IT network breach, reports The Real Deal.

Elliman is one of the largest residential property management firms in New York City, representing 390 properties and over 45,000 units as of 2018.

The email said how the firm has detected "suspicious activity" on its IT system on April 7, and had contacted law enforcement. It was said how an unauthorized party gained access to the network, including files containing the personal data or owners and employees. This data may have included names, dates of birth, mailing addresses, Social Security numbers, driver's license numbers, passport numbers and financial information.

Geico

Finally, this week saw the reporting of a data breach at the Geico insurance company that left customers' driver's license numbers exposed online for more than a month. The incident was detailed in a data breach notice filed with the attorney general of California, and first reported by TechCrunch.

"We recently determined that between January 21, 2021 and March 1, 2021, fraudsters used information about you – which they acquired elsewhere – to obtain unauthorized access to your driver's license number through the online sales system on our website," the notice said.

It went on: "We have reason to believe that this information could be used to fraudulently apply for unemployment benefits in your name." Geico does not say how many customers may have been affected by the data breach, but says the error has now been fixed.

Week of April 12, 2021: ParkMobile

It's difficult when the app designed to save drivers one of their biggest headaches creates another. But that's exactly what happened when to those who use a very popular app, ParkMobile, which millions of people throughout North American can use to digitally pay for their parking spot on the street. The app's customer data has been breached and is for sale on a crime forum, according to KrebsOnSecurity.

To create an app, drivers have to input the typical — personal — details including phone numbers, email address 5sos tickets pnc bank arts center in some cases mailing addresses. And because this app helps ensure a driver's specific car has paid for its parking, license plate numbers have been breached as well. ParkMobile apparently knew at least by March 26 about the issue, because they put out a security report. But they did not tell people to go in and change their password. Which we're telling you to do. Now.

Houston Rockets

The NBA's Houston Rockets, are getting hit with a ransomware attack to reclaim business details about the basketball team, said Bloomberg, which confirmed the news. The team said it prevented some ransomware attempts from being installed on its system, but not all. And the hackers have publicly stated they have some details including contracts, financial information and non-disclosure agreements, and will publish them if they don't get paid. How successful is this particularly hacking group? They reportedly got one victim to pay $85,000.

W2 phishing lures

People are getting phishing emails claiming to be a file regarding a Home Loan, with a link that purports to have their 2020 Tax Returns and a W2 attached. That's the lure. But when people click on the link, they're presented with a form which asks them to put their email details — including password — to get into the file. That, clearly, doesn't open the file as it doesn't exist. Instead, people have just given hackers access to their email account.

Key here is not to click on links in emails almost ever. Even if an email comes from a tested source, these can be spoofed — or faked — and a better course of action is to call the person and confirm that they've actually sent the email you've received.

Week of April 5, 2021: Facebook

This week began with the discovery of the personal details of 533 million Facebook users in a hacking forum. The freely-available data include phone numbers, names and dates of birth from users across 106 countries, with 32 million US citizens implicated. The data came from a vulnerability that was patched by Facebook in August 2019. Facebook has confirmed the legitimacy of the data but says it will not be informing uses that have had their details exposed by the breach.

Instead, users can check if they have been caught up in the breach by entering their phone number into the Have I Been Pwned website, an online tool that cross-references data against data breaches.

Read More:

More than 500M Facebook users have had details leaked online

Booking.com

Travel website Booking.com has been fined €475,000 (approximately $560,000) due to breaching GDPR law when failing to report a data breach within 72 hours. The company suffered a data breach in 2018 and discovered on January 13, 2019 that the details belonging to 4,100 users had been stolen. But instead of reporting the data breach to regulator within three days, Booking.com waited until February 7 to disclose the incident.

Due to the breach in Europe's data protection laws, Netherlands-based Booking.com was issued with the fine. The Dutch Data Protection Authority said: "This is a serious violation. A data breach can unfortunately happen anywhere, even if you have taken good precautions. But to prevent damage to your customers and the recurrence of such a data breach, you have to report this on time."

Michigan State University

Michigan State University (MSU) this week said it has been implicated in a data breach stemming from a cyber-attack on Ohio law firm Bricker & Eckler LLP. The firm was hit by a ransomware attack in January 2021, where an unauthorised party gained access to internal systems over the second half of the month. Exposed data may have included names, addresses and some medical-related and educational-related information, plus driver's licence numbers and, in some cases, Social Security numbers.

It was then reported by Lansing State Journal that the data breach saw the exposure of Title IX case information belonging to just under 350 people at MSU, reports Lansing State Journal. Bricker said in a statement: "A limited number of individuals, some of whom are no longer affiliated with MSU, may have been impacted. Those individuals have been contacted and connected with the proper resources."

Week of March 29, 2021: IRS refund

Hackers are reportedly sending emails targeting college students and universities that use a ".edu" email, claiming to be the Internal Revenue Service and offering tax payers a way to check on the status of their refunds.

The emails, which have different subject lines including "Tax Refund Payment" or "Recalculation of your tax refund payment" then have a link, which when clicked takes people to a phishing site. There, they're asked for details including Social Security number, driver's license number, address, birth date, name and more. Tellingly these are data points the IRS does ask for on its own site — which means hackers wells fargo business account reviews use this information to then reroute legitimate refunds to themselves.

Got one of these emails? You can save the email using the "save as" option, and send that as an attachment to [email protected]

University of Maryland + University of California

A ransomware attack appears to be going on against the University of Maryland and the University of California, according to ZDNet. Screenshots of passports, a federal tax document, an application for tuition remission and more have appeared, presumably grabbed by the hackers, and show Social Security numbers, birth dates, immigration status and other personal details.

Ubiquiti

In January 2021, Ubiquiti, which makes networking devices like routers, had reported a breach of its systems that had been hosted by a third-party. At the time, the company said that they were "aware of evidence of access to databases that host user data." Now, Krebs on Security, reports that a whistleblower has said the breach was actually "catastrophic," and that the claim of a third-party being the one targeted — and not Ubiquiti — "…was a fabrication."

Instead, hackers got complete access to the Ubiquiti's databases via Amazon Web Services, which is what the whistleblower says the company pointed to as the third party. Hackers then were able to get into all databases, all user database details and more. Those details reportedly could have allowed hackers to authenticate any of Ubiquiti's cloud-based devices. Which is again a reason to : Change. Your. Password.

bankatfidelity bank Week of March 22, 2021: FatFace

British clothing retailer FatFace this week told its customers that it has been the victim of a data breach – then asked them to keep the matter private. The breach occurred on January 17, two months before the company informed its customers that an unspecified amount of data including names, email and postal addresses, and the last four digits and expiry date of their credit cards, had been compromised.

FatFace said the two-month delay in disclosing the breach was due to identifying who was involved in the incident and what data was involved. The company said: "This identification effort was comprehensive and coordinated by our external security experts; it therefore took time to thoroughly analyze and categorize the data to ensure we can provide the most accurate information possible."

The company then asked affected customers to "keep this email and the information included within it strictly private and confidential."

As security expert Graham Clueley said this week: "What a shame FatFace hadn't been quite so cautious about the privacy and confidentiality of its customer".

Solairus Aviation bank of america online wire transfer

Next up this week, we have air charter firm Solairus Aviation, which announced on March 23 that it had suffered a data breach. Some employee and customer data was compromised in an incident at third-party vendor Avianis, an aviation business management platform provider.

Data store by Solairus with Avianis included employee and client names, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, driver's licence numbers, passport numbers and financial account numbers. The company said in a message to customers: "Solairus regrets the inconvenience or concern this incident may cause you. Every member of the Solairus community is important, and Solairus values your security and privacy."

Shell

Oil and gas company Shell announced on March 16 that it had suffered a data breach related to an incident involving Accellion's file transfer application, which is used by Shell to securely transfer large data files.

Shell said in a statement: "Upon learning of the incident, Shell addressed the vulnerabilities with its service provider and cyber security team, and started an investigation to better understand the nature and extent of the incident. There is no evidence of any impact to Shell's core IT systems as the file transfer service is isolated from the rest of Shell's digital infrastructure."

The company did not say how many individuals were affected by the data breach, but said an unknown actor gained access to "various files" during the breach. This included personal data and information "from Shell companies and some of their stakeholders."

Week of March 15, 2021: WeLeakInfo

In a reversal many may say is fair, WeLeakInfo — a site where people once went to buy stolen data — leaked the details on those who have made purchases from them. Data on more than 24,000 users was found in an archived ZIP file, according to TechRadar, and is now on sale.

The information stems from sales made over Stripe, which is an online payment system, and includes names, IP addresses, physical addresses, and some credit card details. There are also the dates the transactions happened, Stripe reference numbers and phone numbers.

New York Unemployment

New Yorkers applying for unemployment may have been caught in a phishing scam that captured not only their details — but also actual personal documents. The scam worked over text and email, and if someone clicked on the link, it sent to them a site that looked exactly like the website where people apply for unemployment through New York. Except this site was a fake, according to CBS.

After logging on as they would for unemployment (which then captured their username and password), the fake site asked for documents, further netting Social Security cards and driver's licenses among other details.

Rule of thumb? When going to state or federal web sites, type the URL into Google — do not click on a link.

Traffic ticket

Another attack that starts with luring victims to click a rogue link comes through a traffic ticket email. People are sent an email with a subject line that claims they've earned a ticket. There's a link in the email which sends them to a rogue site — where they're told to click on a photo to see proof of their violation, says ZDNet.

That link though actually puts malware on their computer — one called Trickbot, known for being used as a banking trojan — which can steal login details on Windows computers.

Again: please do not click on links in emails.

Week of March 8, 2021: Microsoft

Microsoft said on March 8 how it was still seeing "multiple actors" taking advantage of unpatched systems to attack organizations that used its Exchange Server platform. The update came almost a week after the computer giant first announced it has detected multiple zero-day exploits being used to attack on-premises versions of Exchange Server in what it called "limited and targeted attacks."

The computer giant attributed the attack "with high confidence" to HAFNIUM, a group said to be state-sponsored and operating out of China. The White House later users computer network operators to take further steps to ensure their systems are safe, as patches released by Microsoft were found to still leave serious vulnerabilities. The White House said: "We can't stress enough that patching and mitigation is not remediation if the servers have already been compromised, and it is essential that any organization with a vulnerable server take measures ti determine if they were already targeted."

Netgain

It was found this week that a cyberattack on cloud hosting and IT service provider Netgain now affects an additional 210,000 Americans. Minnesota-based Netgain Technologies had to take down some of its data centers following a cyberattack in November 2020.

Netgain provides services to several companies in the healthcare and accounting sectors, and admitted in December that health informations of patients from Woodcreek Provider Service was stored on servers affected by the attack. The information included names, addresses, medical record numbers, dates of birth, social security numbers, insurance claims, clinical notes, invoices, bank account numbers, DEA certificates, and some medical records, among other data.

Verkada

Finally this week, a hacking collective breached a database containing the video feeds of security cameras collected by Verkada, a technology startup based in Silicon Valley. The trove of data included live feeds of 150,000 security cameras situated in sensitive locations like schools, police departments, hospitals, prisons and businesses. Bloomberg reported that high profile firms exposed by the breach included Tesla and Cloudfare.

It was reported that the data breach was carried out by hackers who wanted to demonstrate how easily such surveillance systems could be broken into.

Verkada said: "Our internal security team and external security firm are investigating the scale and scope of this issue, and we have notified law enforcement."

Week of March 1, 2021: Malaysia Airlines

Malaysia Airlines has had a nearly decade-long data breach that ended bank of america branches in delhi revealing the details about members of its frequent flyer program, Enrich, from their names to their gender.

The airlines has admitted to the breach and said it was notified by a third-party IT service provider about the issue which took place between March 2010 and June 2019, according to Bleeping Computer. While passwords were not involved, said Malaysia Airlines, members' contact information, their rewards tier level, their frequent flyer number and their birthdays were part of the breach.

Over Twitter, the airline stated this as well, that its computer systems were not involved in the breach, but instead happened on a third-party's network. And the airline further encouraged members to change their passwords.

SITA

The airline passenger system, SITA, got hit by a data breach, the company stated on March 4. Involved in the attack, with SITA said happened February 24, 2021, is passenger data was breached. SITA handles details for multiple areas of the airline industry from baggage to passenger processing and the company claims to have about 90 percent of the airlines in the world as its customers.

Qualys

Qualys, a cloud security and compliance firm, has confirmed that a hack of Accellion, the one that caught a number of other firms including grocer Kroger, has affected them as well.

While the company says operations were not affected, the exploit did affect information that was "part of our customer support system," said the firm in a statement. The company also found that some files were accessed without permission that had been "hosted on the Accellion FTA server," they said. Qualys also stated it had notified "the limited number of customers impacted by this unauthorized access."

Week of February 22, 2021: Kroger

Kroger recently announced it has fallen victim to a data breach that struck at Accellion, a third-party firm providing a file transfer tool. The grocery store is in the process of contacting customers who might have been affected by the breach, which it says has presented no indication of fraud or misuse of personal information.

Krogen stopped using Accellion's service after being informed of the breach in late-January 2021, reported the incident to the authorities, and began a forensic investigation.

Kroger said: "No credit or debit card information or customer account passwords were affected by this incident.While Kroger has no indication of fraud or misuse of personal information as a result of this incident, out of an abundance of caution Kroger has arrange to offer credit monitoring to all affected individuals at no cost to them."

NurseryCam

NurseryCam, a service that lets parents view their children through a webcam while at nursery, has suffered a data breach. Informing its users of the incident this week, NurseryCam said it did not believe the incident had resulted in children or staff being watched by anyone without permission, but has switched off its server as a precaution.

The company said attackers had exploited a loophole in its system that allowed them to gather up the usernames, passwords, names and email addresses of parents who had used the service to watch their children remotely, the BBC reports. NurseryCam director Dr Melissa Kao said: "The person who identified the loophole has so far acted responsibly.he stated he has no intention to use this to do any harm".

The UK-based company is based in Guildford, Surrey and provides its services to around 40 nurseries across the country.

Clubhouse:

Clubhouse, the popular social media app that lets users join audio-only group chats, has suffered a data breach (of sorts). While no personal user data has been stolen, a third-party developer discovered a way to stream audio conversations on their website, despite Clubhouse being iPhone-only and invitation-only. This goes against Clubhouse's claims that audio conversations cannot be recorded, and the user has since been permanently banned from the app.

This incident led to Stanford cybersecurity researchers discovering that user ID numbers and chatroom IDs were being transmitted by Clubhouse in plaintext without any encryption. Clubhouse IDs can be connected to user profiles, leading to identities being traced.

Due to these issues, David Thiel, chief technology officer of the Stanford Internet Observatory, warned that users should consider Clubhouse conversations to be "semi-public"

.

Week of February 15, 2021: Kia Motors American

Kia Motors America, based in California, was hit with a heavy ransomware attack to the tune of 404 bitcoin — which at the time attackers claimed was worth about $20 million. (404 of course is a reference to an error message meaning a link is not turning up a requested page on the web.) Today, bitcoin is hovering at about $51,811 which makes that value jump to $20.9 million. And the attackers actually warned that the amount would jump to 600 bitcoin if the payment was not made in a "specific time frame," according o details obtained by Bleeping Computer.

With the payment, hackers promised to release a tool which would unlock the data — and also to not leak data as well. Kia Motors America however told Bleeping Computer they had not seen evidence that they were in fact victims of a ransomware attack.

Law firm Jones Day

A law firm, Jones Day, has suffered a data breach that involves internal communication within the firm, as well as client data, according to Bloomberg Law.

The breach occurred from the file transfer platform, FTA, used by the firm and provided by Accellion. And at least one other law firm has in recent weeks also been affected by the same breach as well. Accellion has admitted that FTA was hit by a cyberattack, and had notified customers on December 23, 2020.

California DMW

Up to 20 months of personal information on drivers in California may have been breached during an attack on the state's DMV. The hack came via a third-party breach, one that hit Automatic Funds Transfer Services, according to SF Gate.

Involved are details one would expect the DMV would have drivers' names, addresses and license plate numbers, but not information such as Social Security numbers.

Week of February 8, 2021: Cryptocurrency theft with SIM-swapping

This week, Europol announced the arrests of eight people for their alleged involvement in a series of SIM-swapping attacks targeting high-profile victims in the US. These follow two earlier arrests of people believed to be of the same criminal network. The group is alleged to have targeted thousands of victims throughout 2020, including famous influencers, sports stars, musicians and their families. Europol claims the group is believed to have stolen over $100 million worth of cryptocurrency from the victims, after gaining illegal access to their phones.

SIM-swapping is described by Europol: "It involves cybercriminals taking over use of a victim's phone number by essentially deactivating their SIM and porting the allocated number over to a SIM belonging to a member of the criminal network. The is typically achieved by the criminals exploiting phone service providers to do the swap on their behalf, either via a corrupt insider or using social engineering techniques."

'Compilation of Many Breaches'

An unprecedented 3.27 billion cleartext username and email addresses were leaked on a popular hacking forum this week, putting a huge proportion of internet users at risk to credential-stuffing attacks on their private accounts. Reported by Cyber News, the incident involved the leaking of databases containing usernames and passwords caught up in many previous leaks and data breaches, including those of Netflix and LinkedIn. The incident is known as the COMB, or the Compilation of any Breaches.

Cyber News explained: "This does not appear to be a new breach, but rather the largest compilation of multiple breaches.The impact to consumers and businesses of this new breach may be unprecedented. Because the majority of people reuse their passwords and usernames across multiple accounts, credential stuffing attacks is the biggest threat."

Credential stuffing is where criminals use databases like this to repeatedly guess at the usernames and passwords of online accounts. Once one has been cracked, they can use that email address and password combination on other services, assuming the victim used the same details more than once. The leak is believed to be twice as large as 2017's Breach Compilation, which included 1.4 billion email addresses and passwords from 252 previous breaches, including Minecraft, Badoo, Bitcoin and Pastebin.

Cyberpunk developer CD Projekt

CD Projekt, the Polish developer of the Cyberpunk 2077 video game, fell victim to a cyberattack this week. Hackers broken into the company's servers and claim to have stolen source code relating to its Cyberpunk 2077, Gwent and Witcher 3 video games. A ransom note left by the hackers and published this morning (February 9) by CD Projekt's Twitter account also claims they have obtained "all of your documents relating to accounting, administration, legal, HR, investor relations and more". The hackers say these documents "will be sent to our contacts in gaming journalism," and that the game developer's servers have been encrypted.

The hackers then appear to have put the stolen code up for auction, with a starting price of $1million and a buy-it-now option for $7million. The hackers later claimed to have received an offer for the data, according to cybersecurity firm Kela.

In a statement released alongside a copy of the ransom note, CD Projekt said it discovered the cyber attack on February 8 and admitted that some of its "internal systems" had been compromised. The statement said: "An unidentified actor gained unauthorized access to our internal network, collected data belonging to CD Projekt capital group, and left a ransom note.Although some devices in our network have been encrypted, our backups remain intact. We have already secured our IT infrastructure and begun restoring the data."

Week of February 1, 2021: USCellular

USCellular admitted to a hack of a program that leaked names, addresses, billing information and others details of existing customers. The breach happened in January 2021, and occurred when retail workers in a store downloaded a rogue program to a computer — which then tunneled into USCellular's system, specifically a customer relationship management program.

The company filed a notice with the Office of the Vermont Attorney General, but also reached out to customers involved, alerting them to the breach and to the fact that best buy cbna credit card phone number login details had been changed as well as PIN numbers. The affected computer has been take offline, and employee login details have also been changed.

Washington state jose ramirez signed bat

People who filed for unemployment in Washington state may have been caught up in a data breach that revealed personal details on 1.6 million claimants from throughout 2020. The breach is being blamed on an outside software service, Accellion, according to GeekWire.

The attack itself occurred on December 25, 2020, and the data affected included people who had filed for unemployment through December 10, as well as some state employees. Details from someone's name to their Social Security number, driver's license, bank information and where they had worked prior to filing was also exposed. People who believe they may have been involved can go to a state web site with more details about the breach, put up by the Office of the Washington State Auditor, for further information.

DriveSure

A car dealership based in Illinois had its database breached, with details on more than 3 million customers involved. The breach, reported by Infosecurity, involved DriveSure, and included information including names, email addresses, phone numbers, the car that is owned, home addresses, car damage and more. It also involved more than 93,000 hashed passwords.

The hack was discovered after the data was uploaded to a dark web forum on December 19, 2020, and included three folders of information including .mil and .gov email addresses.

Week of January 25, 2021: Bonobos

Men's clothing store Bonobos suffered a massive data breach earlier this month, which saw the exposure of millions of customers details in a 70GB database. The trove of data, lifted from Bonobos' website, included customer addresses, phone numbers, the last four digits of credit card numbers, order information and password histories, reports Bleeping Computer.

The data included the addresses and phone numbers of seven million customers or orders, and 3.5 million partial credit card numbers. The retailer, which was bought by Walmart in 2017 for $300 million, says the data was stolen from an online backup rather than from the website itself. The company said: "What we have discovered is an unauthorized third party was able to view a backup file hosted in an external cloud environment. We contacted the host provider to resolve this issue as soon as we became aware of it." Customers of Bonobos are urged to change their passwords immediately, and to change their login details of any other services or accounts they use with the same password.

VIP Games

Online gaming platform VIP Games was found this week to have exposed 23 million data records on a misconfigured server, researchers from WizCase discovered. The data belonged to 66,000 users and included usernames, email addresses, social media IDs, bets, device details, IP addresses and hashed passwords.

VIP Games has in the region of 20,000 daily players and offers online versions of popular classic card and board games like Ludo and Dominoes. Chase Williams from WizCase wrote: "If such data had fallen into the hands of cybercriminals, it could have been exploited for identity theft, fraud, phishing, scamming, espionage and malware infestation. The leak was discovered as part of WizCase' research project that randomly looked for open servers and sought to understand what data these servers contained."

BuyUCoin

Crytocurrency services are a popular target for hackers, and the latest victim is India-based BuyUCoin, which appears to have had an insecure database accessed by hacking group ShinyHunters. The cryptocurrency exchange says it is investigating claims that sensitive data of hundreds of thousands of its users has been published on the dark web, reports Graham Cluley for BitDefender. The 6GB of leaked data appears to have come from a MongoDB database and includes user bank account details, email addresses, hashed passwords, mobile phone numbers and Google sign-in tokens.

Having first described the incident as "a low impact security incident" which only affected 200 entries of non-sensitive dummy data, BuyUCoin later replaced this statement with a message saying it is "investigating each and every aspect of the report about malicious and unlawful cybercrime activities by foreign entities in mid-2020."

Week of January 18, 2021: Capcom

Gamers of the popular titles "Dark Stalkers" and "Resident Evil," should check their credentials — and start changing passwords. The developer of the titles, Capcom, is now expanding the number of accounts that may have been compromised in a ransomware attack from November 2020, reports Threatpost.

Originally thought to be 40,000 customers, the attack now may have affected 400,000 accounts with personal data involved.

Nitro

Nitro, a web-based PDF service, just got hit in one of the worst ways, with its database of more than 77 million records leaked online — for free. The details inside include email addresses, names and passwords and even IP addresses which is the unique number assigned to a device, like your computer, to get online.

While the hack actually happened in 2020, the database is actually now online, placed there after offering the download link for $3, according to BleepingComputer.

Malwarebytes

The security firm Malwarebytes is reporting a hack into its system, gaining access to some internal company emails. The breach gained access through Microsoft Office 365 and Azure, according to Ars Technica, which added that this is the same threat actor that was involved with the attack on SolarWinds in 2019.

Week of January 11, 2021: Parler

Despite being taken offline, and distanced by Apple, Google and Amazon, millions of posts published to the Parler social media app are still visible online. The messages were accessed, 'scraped' from Parler before the service was taken offline on January 11, and uploaded to the Internet Archive. This was done by Twitter user @donk_enby, a so-called hacker and internet activist. She tweeted to say the scraped data included delete and private posts, plus videos that contained "all associated metadata." This data is thought to include the location of where the posts and videos were created.

A such, the data collected by @donk_enby could prove highly valuable, as law enforcement could potentially use the metadata to identify rioters who stormed the Capitol last week. Unusual for Parler is how it doesn't strip out the metadata of uploaded images and videos, as other social networks and web services do.

Ubiquiti

Ubiquiti Networks, a vendor of networking equipment and Internet of Things devices, informed its customers on January 11 to inform them of a recent security breach. The company said: "We recently became aware of unauthorized access to certain of our information technology systems hosted by a third party cloud provider." The targeted servers stored information relating to user profiles for the company's account.ui.com web portal.

While the company says it is "not currently aware of evidence of access to any databases that host user data," it admits it "cannot be certain that user data has not been exposed." This data, Ubiquiti says, may include customer names, email addresses and one-way encrypted passwords – in other words, passwords that are hashed and salted. Customers are urged to change their password, and also the passwords of any websites and services that use the same username and email address as on Ubiquiti. Customers should also enable two-factor authentication.

Pfizer

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced on January 12 that some of the data stolen from the servers of Pfizer and BioNTech, creators of a Covid-19 vaccine, has been leaked online. The EMA said: "The ongoing investigation of the cyberattack on EMA revealed that some of the lawfully accessed documents related to Covid-19 medicines and vaccines belonging to third parties have been leaked on the internet.Necessary action is being taken by the law enforcement authorities."

The agency was keen to point out that European medicines regulation services remain fully functional, and the evaluation and approval timelines of Covid-19 vaccines have not been affected by the data breach, reports BleepingComputer. It is claimed the stolen data, which was unlawfully accessed in December 2020, includes screenshots of emails, EMA peer-reviewed comments, Word documents, PDFs and PowerPoint presentations.

Week of January 4, 2021: British Airways £3 billion settlement

British Airways to starting to talk about settlements regarding 2018 data breaches that exposed details about 185,000 of the airlines rewards members as well as about 380,000 regular users of its app and web site.

Details from names to email addresses, and even credit card as well as the security codes were breached, and the settlement could reach up to £3 billion, according to Infosecurity magazine.

T-Mobile attacked again

T-Mobile has peggy captain america alerting customers about a data breach that involved their phone numbers, the number of lines on their accounts and even call records. But the company emphasized that details including Social Security numbers, passwords and even physical addresses were not compromised.

The unauthorized access was stopped, said T-Mobile, which is now investigating and has also "reported this matter to federal law enforcement," it said in a statement.

The company reported a similar attack back in March 2020.

Aurora Cannabis employee data breached

Canadian cannabis company Aurora Cannabis has started to reaching out to employees — both current and past — about a breach on December 25, 2020. Involved were details that the company would have had on file about people who worked there including banking data and home addresses, reports MJBizDaily.

People report they first started hearing about it on December 31, which involved a breach into software including SharePoint and OneDrive.

Источник: https://www.gearbrain.com/data-breach-cybersecurity-latest-hacks-2633724298.html

Breaking News

Zero-day Exploits of On-Premises Versions of Microsoft Exchange

March 10, 2021

As you have probably seen reported, Microsoft has detected multiple Zero-day exploits of on-premises versions of Microsoft Exchange in limited and targeted attacks.

Below are our recommendations for handling these threats (if you are a DSM managed IT services client we are executing these steps for you):

  • Scan your environment for compromise
  • Install the security update immediately for the appropriate Exchange CU (Cumulative Update)
  • Ensure all anti-virus and malware scanners are up-to-date and active
  • Remove access from the internet to hybrid-Exchange mgmt only servers

Update Details:

The security updates are only available for the following specific versions of Exchange:

The vulnerabilities affect Microsoft Exchange Server, not Exchange Online. However, if you are running a Hybrid organization you need to apply those Security Updates to your on-premises Exchange Server, even if it is used for management purposes only.

Additional Resources:

We will continue to provide updates and information as necessary.

Facebook Exposes Millions of User Passwords Internally

March 22, 2019

Up to 20,000 Facebook employees became privy to the passwords of millions of Facebook users, who were able to view up to 600 million passwords stored in plain text.

Security researcher Brian Krebs, of Krebs on Security, released the breaking news, stating that exposed passwords could date as far back to 2012.

Facebook claims to have resolved the "glitch" which showed the unencrypted passwords on its internal network. The social network also said it had discovered the issue in January as part of a security review.

Scott Renfro, a Facebook engineer, stated that their internal investigated showed there were no "signs of misuse.”

Recent Data Breach at Zoll Medical Exposes Data of 277K Patients

March 20, 2019

Zoll Medical, a manufacturer of medical devices and software, revealed on Monday that the personal information of 277,319 patients was exposed during a recent server migration. The breach included names, addresses, date of birth, and medical information. Some patients’ social security numbers were also exposed.

The medical company would not divulge whether the breach was accidental or the result of a hack, just that it occurred sometime between November 8 and December 28, 2018.

"At this point, Zoll is not aware of any fraud or identity theft to any individual as a result of this exposure," a company release stated. "The vendor has since confirmed that all information has now been secured."

According to the Health and Human Services Data Portal, this is the first data breach that Zoll has reported in the past two years.
The exposure continues the recent rise in healthcare data breaches.

Recent Data Breach Affects Thousands of Michigan Healthcare Customers

March 12, 2019

The information of more than 600,000 healthcare customers of the Detroit-based Wolverine Solutions Group in Michigan may have just been compromised.

The Wolverine Solutions Group includes Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, Health Alliance Plan, McLaren Health Care, Three Rivers Health, and North Ottawa Community Health System.

According to the company website, breached customer information may include name, phone number, address, date of birth, social security number, and insurance and medical information.

“Wolverine is offering two levels of identity protection to individuals affected by the breach,” said Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) Director Anita G. Fox. "If you receive a letter from the company, we urge you to read phone number santander customer service carefully and consider enrolling in the free credit monitoring service.”

Additional step Michiganders can take to further protect their information includes:

  • Pulling their free credit report at annualcreditreport.com or calling 877-322-8228.

  • Putting a fraud alert on their credit file (visit the Federal Trade Commission’s identity theft website here).

  • Putting a security freeze on their credit file.

  • Using two-factor authentication on their online accounts whenever it’s available.

For additional information on Michigan data breaches, residents should view the Michigan Attorney General’s consumer alert. A toll-free information hotline has also been made available, at 877-412-7152.

Government Data Breaches

Hackers Expose Personal Data of Hundreds of German Officials

January 6, 2019

An unknown Twitter account published the personal information of hundreds of German officials, including Chancellor Angela Merkel, triggering an emergency crisis meeting of the National Cyber Defense Agency. 

While it remains uncertain whether the breach stemmed from a hack or a leak, it's still highly troubling for the country, which has become a prime target for hackers in recent years (just last year, a cyberattack compromised the foreign ministry's computer network).

"This data breach .is alarming, but at the same time it's not surprising," said Mike Hart at commercial cyber security firm FireEye, citing previous hacks. "It highlights the need for government to take cyber security very seriously."

Twitter shut down the account hours after news of the hacking came to light.

Recent Data Breach on Click2Gov Payment System

January 5, 2019

Adding insult to injury, Canadians who paid a parking ticket in the city of Saint John, New Brunswick, have just been notified of a data breach within the parking system—and that it's been there since May 2017.

In a statement issued this week, officials stated that the breach involved “multiple instances when an unknown source gained access to confidential customer information on the city’s server through the Click2Gov payment system.”

The breach exposed first and last names, mailing addresses, and credit card information. It was discovered by a cybersecurity analyst that had been hired to assess vulnerabilities within the system.

In the wake of the discovery, the city has issued an apology to victims and warned them to monitor their credit card activity. The online parking payment system has also been temporarily shut down.

Phishing Email Attack Targets Australian Government

January 2, 2019

That didn't take long.

Following a banner year for breaches in 2018, the first big data breach of the new year has happened. Thankfully, those of us in the United States can (temporarily) breathe a sigh of relief.

The attack occurred in Australia, originating from a phishing email delivered to a government employee. It resulted in the accidental release and theft of the personal data of approximately 30,000 Australian civil servants.

The stolen data included work emails, phone numbers, and job titles. According to officials, banking and financial information was not captured by hackers.

Easy to execute and highly profitable to hackers, phishing attacks are on the rise and are becoming more sophisticated than ever, costing mid-size companies an average of over $1.5 million per year.

Recent Data Breach at USPS

November 26th, 2018

On November 26, it was revealed that a security flaw in the USPS app, Informed Visibility, which allows customers to see their mail before it arrives, exposed the data of more than 60 million users. The app’s vulnerability left users’ account details, including usernames, IDs, and email and home addresses, available to anyone with basic knowledge of the data elements processed by a regular web browser. Though it has been confirmed that user passwords were not accessible, hackers could potentially use the other readily available information to deploy mass or targeted phishing emails to obtain even more sensitive information from victims.

While the USPS has since patched the vulnerability, what has many people outraged is that an anonymous security researcher reported the vulnerability to the USPS over a year ago, but it wasn’t until cybersecurity journalist Brian Krebs exposed it that they finally took action.

Business Data Breaches

Recent Facebook Data Breaches Have Social Media Giant Under Fire

February 18, 2019

Ever since the 2017 Cambridge Analytica scandal of 2017, Facebook and other social sites have been under fire. Cambridge Analytica, of course, is the British data mining and political consultancy firm that was accused of influencing the 2016 United States election due to privacy and data breaches that were the fault of Facebook. This resulted in probes by the Federal Trade Commission and two-days worth of questioning in which Mark Zuckerberg himself was hauled in front of US Congress.

Now, the final report published under this investigation has been released. In it, the UK’s Digital, Culture, Media and Sports Committee, which is part of the Parliament, is asking for the creation of a regulatory body that would have the legal authority to monitor, control, and penalize social media and IT companies. Facebook is singled out in the report, and is criticized for abusing privacy policies and sharing data with third-parties for profit.

Facebook responded to the report today, telling British lawmakers the company is “open to meaningful regulation” as well as a code of ethics to take on the spread of fake news and abuse of users' data. Facebook's public policy manager, Karim Palant, added that Facebook is "not the same company" it was a year ago and has already made substantial changes to its procedures.

33 Colorado Cybersecurity Breaches Identified Following New Consumer Data-Privacy Law

February 13, 2019

Colorado’s new state data-privacy law, which requires organizations to report consumer data breaches within 30 days of the incident, has led to 33 companies notifying over 90,000 consumers of a data breach. While this may seem like a suspiciously low number of consumers, it’s unknown as to how many organizations are actually complying with the law. Plus, companies are only required to alert the attorney general’s office if the breach impacts more than 500 Coloradans.  

The law, which began as House Bill 1128, was easily passed in the state legislature in late 2018 and is one of the strictest in the nation due to the 30-day notification period (Florida is the only other state requiring a 30-day notification, although a 15-day extension may be allowed if an organization can show good cause for it).

“A lot of times, you don’t know the full scope of what information was affected and you have to get cyber forensics to get in there,” says Esteban Morin, a Denver-based attorney specializing in privacy and data security. “That can take a lot of time, but you’re on this very rigid clock.”

India SBI Bank Data Breach: Fact or Fiction?

February 4, 2019

Last week, reports that SBI—India’s largest bank—was using an unprotected server that would give anyone who knew where to look to access to millions of customers' financial information, appear to be untrue.

SBI initially denied requests for information from media outlets, but has now spoken. And what they had to say came as a welcome surprise to millions of account holders.

“The matter has been thoroughly investigated," the bank stated. "SBI would like to assure all its customers that their data is safe and secure and SBI is fully committed to ensuring this.”

SBI also carried out an investigation, which has concluded that SBI’s servers are fully protected, and that no breach occurred.

SBI also had some words for outlets first reporting the supposed breach: “SBI has taken serious note of news articles appearing in the media regarding customer data being exposed to risk."

Yahoo Data Breach Settlement Rejected

January 30, 2019

Yahoo isn’t saying “woo-hoo!” this week.

A proposed class-action settlement in which Yahoo would have paid up to $85 million to resolve claims related to major data breaches affecting approximately 200 million users between 2012 and 2016 has been rejected.

According to U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh, the proposed settlement was “improper,” and Koh believes Yahoo is still not disclosing the full details of its data breaches.

“Yahoo misrepresents the number of affected Yahoo users by publicly filing an inflated, inaccurate calculation of users and simultaneously filing under seal a more accurate, much smaller number,” Koh wrote in her 24-page decision. “Yahoo’s history of nondisclosure and lack of transparency related to the data breaches are egregious. Unfortunately, the settlement agreement, proposed notice, motion for preliminary approval, and public and sealed supplemental filings continue this pattern of lack of transparency.”

In 2013, cyber-criminals stole data, including names, email addresses, passwords, phone numbers, and dates of birth, from an estimated 3 billion Yahoo accounts, but the company didn’t disclose this until December of 2016. In 2014, another breach affected approximately 500 million accounts, with similar information being stolen; again, Yahoo kept the breach under wraps until September of 2016. In the third breach, occurring between 2015 and 2016, cyber-criminals gained access to user passwords by forging cookies.

What’s next for Yahoo and the victims of the breaches? Only time will tell.

GDPR Results in 95,000 Complaints Over Data Breaches (and a Big Fine for Google)

January 28, 2019

Last week, Google was slapped with a €50 million fine (about $57 million) for failing to comply with GDPR transparency rules. The tech giant is guilty of deploying personalized ads without first obtaining user consent, and the fine marks the largest penalty to date under GDPR rules (Google is appealing the decision).

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Only eight months after the adoption of the EU privacy law, Europe's data protection regulators have logged more than 95,000 complaints regarding possible data breaches.

European Commission members expect that number to grow as Europeans become more aware of their rights under the new regulations. "What is at stake is not only the protection of our privacy, but also the protection of our democracies and ensuring the sustainability of our data-driven economies," they said.

Sonic Data Breach: Drive-In, Data Out

January 22, 2019

The Sonic Drive-In is trying to put  in its rear-view mirror.

In 2017, Sonic officials were warned of “unusual activity” among customers using credit or debit cards.

In response, the company offered this:

“Our credit card processor informed us last week of unusual activity regarding credit cards used at SONIC. The security of our guests’ information is very important to SONIC. We are working to understand the nature and scope of this issue, as we know how important this is to our guests. We immediately engaged third-party forensic experts and law enforcement when we heard from our processor. While law enforcement limits the information we can share, we will communicate additional information as we are able." 

This didn't sit well with KrebsOnSecurity. The popular cybersecurity investigation site stated, “The ongoing breach may have led to a fire sale on millions of stolen credit and debit card accounts that are now being peddled in shadowy underground cybercrime stores."

Patrons panicked, resulting in a lawsuit within one week. It paid off; customers now appear to be eligible for a cash payment.

 

A new Sonic notice states, "The Settlement includes all residents of the United States of America who made a purchase at any one of the 325 impacted Sonic Drive-In locations and paid using a credit or debit card from April 7,  through October 28, 2017,"

 

For a full list of stores affected, visit Sonic's data breach site here.

Recent Data Breach at BlackRock Financial Exposes the Personal Information of Thousands

January 21, 2019

Goliath just took a hit.

Founded in 1988, BlackRock, Inc., quickly rose to the top, becoming the world's largest asset management firm. However, a recent accidental post revealing the confidential information of thousands of financial adviser clients on its website has the company reeling.

The data, which included names and email addresses of financial advisers who buy BlackRock’s exchange-traded funds (ETFs) on behalf of customers, showed up via links within the company’s web pages on Dec. 5, 2018. This leak, eventually discovered by Bloomberg this week, since been removed. However, with assets of almost $6 trillion, nerves are rattled.

“We are conducting a full review of the matter,” BlackRock spokesman Brian Beades stated. “The inadvertent and temporary posting of the information relates to two distribution partners serving independent advisers and does not include any of their underlying client information.”

Despite the financial sector’s insistence on strict security protocols, breaches continue to cause damage. JPMorgan Chase & Co. was one such victim. In 2014, the data of nearly 80 million clients exposed due to a data breach. In the aftermath, the company went on an IT security spree, doing everything it could to retain customers and assure them they were safe.

Is that enough? “It’s a permanent battle,” saysbut he resolves that BlackRock, Inc. will continue to fight.

John Reed Stark, a cybersecurity consultant and former member of the SEC, had this to say of the BlackRock breach. “Data security incidents are inevitable. The most important thing in this kind of situation is about the response from the firm, and whether they’re communicating accurately about what happened.”

Collection #1 Data Breach Exposes Millions of Emails and Passwords on MEGA Cloud Service

January 16, 2019

If you’ve just memorized your password, it may be time to change it again.

IT security researcher Troy Hunt has discovered that almost 22 million passwords chase bank security breach 2018 over 770 million email addresses were released on the popular cloud storage service MEGA. Cyber criminals posted a link to the password and email address dump on a hacking forum in a folder called “Collection #1.” It has since been taken down.

According to Hunt, the emails and passwords come from thousands of sources, dating all the way back to 2008.  He found the collection after being alerted by various sources, and even discovered old email addresses and passwords of his own within the file. While his were no longer in use, others may not be so lucky.

Hunt has placed the compromised email addresses and passwords on his website, haveibeenpwned. Anyone can check to see if their email has been breached, and learn what next steps they should take.

"It might be contrary to traditional thinking, but writing unique passwords down in a book and keeping them inside your physically locked house is a damn sight better than reusing the same one all over the web," he added.

Individuals reusing passwords is thought to be the cause of the recent HSBC Bank breach. Credential stuffing, a term coined by former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Sumit Agarwal, refers to hackers automating logins for thousands or millions of users on one site utilizing previously discovered credential pairs from another site. Due to people’s habit of reusing passwords across multiple sites, hackers are almost guaranteed access into multiple accounts.

Recent Data Breaches Plaguing Kitchen Goods Company OXO

January 11, 2019

Out of the frying pan, into the fire.

Award-winning kitchen and housewares giant OXO has been notifying customers of data breach over the past few months, and it’s just released another notification.

In a breach disclosure letter filed with the State of California, OXO said that the data security incident compromised the personal information of its customers, including names, billing and shipping addresses, and credit card information.

OXO identified three specific time frames:

  • June 9, 2017 — Nov. 18, 2017

  • June 8, 2018 — June 9, 2018

  • July 20, 2018 — Oct. 16, 2018

The breach is believed to be caused by Magecart malware which was found on its OXO’s e-commerce website. Magecart is also responsible for data breaches affecting the e-commerce sites of BevMo, British Airways, Newegg, and Ticketmaster UK.

OXO is currently working with security consultants and forensic investigators, who are looking at past vulnerabilities and taking measures to secure the site against future incidents.

Recent Marriott Data Breach Has Company Facing $8.8 Billion in Fines

January 10, 2019

The good news for Marriott? Latest reports show the recently revealed data breach involved just over 380 million guest records versus the 500 million initially estimated.

The bad news? The Marriott is now under investigation in several countries within the European Union, where local authorities are participating within the framework of the Government Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The GDPR is a very complex set of rules and regulations that dictates how data is stored, processed, shared, and managed. It thank you for smoking discussion questions addresses the security of data, and what companies must do in the event of a security breach. Global companies that fail to follow GDPR regulations can face hefty fines.

So what’s at stake for the hotel and resort giant? With a global yearly revenue of of nearly $23 billion in 2017, the EU could impose fines of 4%, or approximately $8.8 billion, far greater than the initial estimate of $3.5 billion predicted by analysts.

Even worse, if it’s discovered that Marriott was aware of the breach before it was revealed, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission may also pursue legal action for causing financial losses to company investors. 

Marriott continues to try to make amends, offering compensation to breach victims and creating a website where they can get answers as well as a call center, 877-273-9481.

Neiman Marcus Data Breach Settlement Reached

January 8, 2019

Further demonstrating the importance of strong data security, the attorney generals of 43 states have reached a $1.5 million settlement with the Neiman Marcus Group. The multi-state settlement resolves an investigation into a 2013 breach that compromised thousands of customer credit cards.

During the investigation, investigators discovered that the breach compromised approximately 370,000 credit cards, and that nearly 10,000 of those were used fraudulently.

In addition to the payout, Neiman Marcus was also required to overhaul its information security measures to prevent data breaches in the future.

Malware Attack Targets Tribune Newspapers Including NY Times, LA Times

December 30, 2018

It looked like nothing more than a simple server outage. However, as Saturday, December 29 unfolded, it became clear that the delayed deliveries of major newspapers was due to a malware attack.  

Despite attempts to quarantine the virus, which originated from outside the United States, it quickly spread throughout the Tribune Publishing network, infecting systems critical to production and printing.

The Los Angeles Times, San Diego Union Tribune, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Baltimore Sun, Orlando Sentinel, and others across the country were affected.

“We believe the intention of the attack was to disable infrastructure, more specifically servers, as opposed to looking to steal information,” said an anonymous source.

Tribune Publishing issued an apology for the delay in news delivery, but were lucky to be able to report that client data had not been breached in this attack.

Recent Data Breach at Marriott

November 30th, 2018

It was announced today, November 30, that Marriott’s guest reservation system was hacked, and the personal information of 500 million guests has possibly been exposed. According to the hotel giant, this more specifically affects the Starwood database which includes the Sheraton, St. Regis, W, and Westin hotels.

According to Marriott: “For approximately 327 million of these guests, the information includes some combination of name, mailing address, phone number, email address, passport number, Starwood Preferred Guest ("SPG") account information, date of birth, gender, arrival and departure information, reservation date, and boa cash rewards credit card review preferences.” The company goes on to say that the payment card information stored within their site was encrypted, and they are unsure as of now if the decryption information was stolen as well.

What is most unsettling about this is that Marriott made this discovery in September 2018, but then learned during the investigation that the unauthorized access to the Starwood database started in 2014. 

Affected guests should receive notification from Marriott over the coming weeks. This massive breach will now become one of the largest corporate data breaches to date.  

Recent Data Breach at Radisson Hotels

November 15th, 2018

Last week, the Radisson Hotel Group—a network of more than 1,400 hotels in more than 70 countries—reported that a data breach within its Radisson Rewards program compromised the personal data of a “small percentage” of members. What’s more worrisome for the hotel group is that those affected were not informed until more than a month later—far beyond the notification as required by the European Union’s () General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

For the hotel group, which is headquartered in Brussels within the EU, steep fines could be forthcoming. If the breach is found to have infringed upon the organization’s obligations, the Radisson Group could be fined up to 10 million Euros (over $11 million), or 2% annual global turnover, whichever is higher. If the breach is found to have infringed upon individual’s privacy rights, the group could be liable for up to 20 million Euros (nearly $22.5 million) or 4% annual global turnover, whichever is higher.

Ross Rustici, senior director of intelligence services at Boston-based firm Cybereason, said the breach will be an interesting test case under the GDPR, which went into effect May 25, 2018. “Each major company that suffers an incident is going to be a for how stringently GDPR gets enforced and what the private sector can actually expect from the regulations,” Rustici said.

Recent Data Breach at HSBC Bank

November 15th, 2018

HSBC Bank, the world’s seventh largest bank, warned approximately 14,000 U.S. customers last week that their personal data, including name, mailing address, phone number, email address, date of birth, account numbers, account types, account balances, transaction history, payee account information and statement history, was compromised in a breach. The bank did state that despite the breach, it did not appear that any fraudulent activity was carried out using the information.

HSBC believes the breach is the result of a credential stuffing cyberattack. Credential stuffing, a term coined by former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Sumit Agarwal, refers to hackers automating logins for thousands or millions of users on one site utilizing previously discovered credential pairs from another site. Due to people’s habit of reusing passwords across multiple sites, hackers are almost guaranteed access into multiple accounts. "We responded to this incident by fortifying our log-on and authentication processes, and implemented additional layers of security for digital and mobile access to all personal and business banking accounts," an HSBC release stated.

Recent Data Breach at Linkedin

November 23rd, 2018

Facebook recently skirted a $1.6 billion General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) fine for the Cambridge Analytica scandal by virtue of the breach happening prior to the European Union’s GDPR implementation. Now, LinkedIn—the “social network of the working world”—has done the same. In a November 23 report released by Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner, it was revealed that LinkedIn had violated the GDPR, which affects many US-based international companies.

According to the report, LinkedIn used the email addresses of 18 million non-subscribers to place targeted ads on Facebook, in a bid to acquire new users (the report does not explain how LinkedIn acquired the addresses). Just as in the Facebook case, however, the social media giant was engaging in the practice prior to the GDPR implementation, so fines could not be imposed. However, LinkedIn was forced to delete all personal data associated with the incident prior to GDPR implementation, and the company’s head of privacy issued a formal apology.

Recent Data Breach at Dell

November 9th, 2018

On November 28, Dell revealed that in an effort to protect their customer’s personal data, they had no choice but to reset all customer account passwords. This announcement came after Dell learned that there was “unauthorized activity on its network” on November 9, when hackers attempted to gain access to names, email addresses, and passwords from the Dell.com electronics store.

"Upon detection of the attempted extraction, Dell immediately implemented countermeasures and initiated an investigation," the company stated in a press release. "Dell also retained a digital forensics firm to conduct an independent investigation and has engaged law enforcement.”

While it’s unclear how many accounts were affected, this once again reveals that hackers are trying to obtain personal information from wherever they can, including computing giants like Dell. If you are a Dell.com customer and you use your old Dell.com password for other accounts, the company recommends you change those passwords immediately.

Recent Data Breach at Google+

March 12th, 2018

In March, Google discovered a bug in the application program interface (API) for Google+, the frost bank midland tx giant’s social media platform. The buy pokemon base set 1st edition booster box had been allowing third-party app developers to access the personal data of not only users who had granted permission, but also the friends of those users since 2015. What has the public most outraged, however, is that while Google uncovered the problem in March, the company failed to disclose the leak to the estimated 500,000 people affected (and the public has spoken; following the announcement, Google shares dropped 1.3% on Monday).

 Why didn’t Google notify the public of the breach? Because it would have invited comparison to the Facebook scandal happening at the time. The Facebook scandal, in which political consulting group Cambridge Analytica gained access to millions of Facebook users’ data without their consent, and led to CEO Mark Zuckerberg being hauled in front of U.S. Congress—was something Google wanted no part in. A Google memo obtained by the Wall Street Journal confirms this: “[disclosure] almost guarantees Sundar will testify before Congress and invite immediate regulatory interest,” the memo said, referring to Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

While it may seem that failure to disclose the breach would be breaking the law, Google found a loophole. In California, where the company resides, data leaks only need to be disclosed if it includes both an individual’s name and Social Security number, ID card or driver’s license number, license plate, or medical or health insurance information. However, because Google only maintains logs of API use for two weeks, it had no way of knowing what information was made available due to the bug. “None of the thresholds for public disclosure were met,” said Ben Smith, Google’s Vice President of Engineering.

Now, the consumer version of Google+ is going dark. No doubt in part because of the breach, but also because of, in Google’s own words in a blog post this week, “the significant challenges in creating and maintaining a successful product” and “low consumer usage.” Google stated that they will wind down the service over the next 10 months to give users time to transition, download, and migrate their data. The company does plan to maintain Google+ for enterprise users, where co-workers can engage in internal discussion on a secure corporate social network.

Healthcare Data Breaches

Recent Data Breach Targets Michigan Healthcare Provider

January 16, 2019

Healthcare organizations—including hospitals, labs, pharmacies, drug companies, and outpatient clinics—continue to attract the attention of cyber criminals due to the sheer amount of data they possess. Breaches hit the industry hard in 2018, with over six million records being exposed, and it’s sure to continue in 2019.

The latest facility to be targeted is the Sacred Heart Rehabilitation Center in Richmond, Michigan. The center has just notified patients about two phishing attacks that compromised an employee’s email account.

Once the breach was discovered, Sacred Heart launched an investigation and brought on forensic specialists to determine the scope of the attack and determine the amount and type of information that was contained in employees’ email accounts. Ultimately, the organization learned that the email account included patient names, addresses, health insurance information, treatment information, and Social Security numbers.

While the behavioral health provider did not disclose the number of patients affected, it did report that not all patients’ data was compromised. Eventually, Sacred Heart will be required to report the number of patients affected to the Health and Human Services Office to be recorded on their data breach website.

Free credit monitoring and identity theft protection has been offered to patients with compromised Social Security numbers, and Sacred Heart is in the process of retraining employees on cybersecurity issues to avoid future attacks.

Recent Data Breach at Bankers Life

August 7th, 2018

Bankers Life, a subsidiary of CNO Financial Group, and provider of health and life insurance plans with 1.4 million was forced to notify more than 566,000 individuals—more than one-third of their clientele—that personal information was exposed in a hacking incident. Information stolen by hackers included names, addresses, dates of birth, insurance policy numbers, insurance type, premium amounts, dates of service, claim amounts, and the last four digits of Social Security numbers.

Prior to alerting policyholders, CNO first reported the incident to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), citing an "unauthorized access/disclosure breach.” The insurers stated that employee credentials were compromised, enabling third parties to gain unauthorized access to company websites housing personal data on policyholders and applicants.

According to the HIPAA Journal, this is the fifth largest healthcare data breach of 2018, and it has already made the HHS’s list of major breaches affecting over 500 people, commonly called the "wall of shame." DSM recently covered the biggest healthcare data breaches of 2018, why hackers love the healthcare industry, and how organizations can fight back. Read more here: Healthcare Data Breaches in 2018: A Bad Year for Data Privacy.

Recent Data Breach at UnityPoint Health

July 10th, 2018

In July, UnityPoint Health—a Madison, Wisconsin-based hospital—was forced to notify 1.4 million patients that their records were breached due to a phishing attack. Adding insult to injury, this is the second breach for UnityPoint this year; in April, another phishing attack on staff email accounts compromised the data of 16,000 patients. The attack was carried out by hackers who sent phony emails to employees, impersonating a top executive and requesting access to email accounts. Staff complied, giving the hackers easy access to the confidential records.

The hacked accounts included protected health information, including names, addresses, medical data, treatment information, lab results and/or insurance information. For some of the 1.4 million patients, their payment card, and Social Security number were also included in the breach. 

Government Data Breaches

Main Title

January 1, 2019

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Phasellus sodales lorem elit, blandit suscipit est condimentum sed. Cras aliquam justo eu tellus aliquet, chase bank security breach 2018 amet scelerisque nulla feugiat. Duis in orci ac lorem tristique dapibus tempor at lacus. Donec ut aliquet eros, vel sodales augue. Proin tincidunt ligula augue, ac convallis lorem auctor id. Etiam vitae est in mi auctor malesuada vel ac lacus. Proin sapien arcu, varius a faucibus congue, maximus id arcu. Aliquam interdum, ex ac consequat molestie, elit felis dapibus risus, sit amet vestibulum turpis eros at sem. Morbi congue faucibus ex maximus ultrices. Sed ut leo lacinia risus mattis tempor sit amet ut ante. Nunc et lorem a lacus pharetra bibendum.

Источник: https://www.dsm.net/recent-data-breaches

: Chase bank security breach 2018

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Justice News

JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPMorgan), a New York, New York-based global banking and financial services firm, has entered into a resolution with the Department of Justice to resolve criminal charges related to two distinct schemes to defraud: the first involving tens of thousands of episodes of unlawful trading in the markets for precious metals futures contracts, and the second involving thousands of episodes of unlawful trading in the markets for U.S. Treasury futures contracts and in the secondary (cash) market for U.S. Treasury notes and bonds.

JPMorgan entered into a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA) in connection with a criminal information filed today in the District of Connecticut charging the company with two counts of wire fraud.  Under the terms of the DPA, JPMorgan will pay over $920 million in a criminal monetary penalty, criminal disgorgement, and victim compensation, with the criminal monetary penalty credited against payments made to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) under a separate agreement with the CFTC being announced today and with part of the criminal disgorgement credited against payments made to the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) under a separate agreement with the SEC being announced today.

“For over eight years, traders on JP Morgan’s precious metals and U.S. Treasuries desks engaged in separate schemes to defraud other market participants that involved thousands of instances of unlawful trading meant to enhance profits and avoid losses,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division.  “Today’s resolution — which includes a significant criminal monetary penalty, compensation for victims, and requires JP Morgan to disgorge its unlawful gains — reflects the nature and seriousness of the bank’s offenses and represents a milestone in the department’s ongoing efforts to ensure the integrity of public markets critical to our financial system.”    

“JPMorgan engaged in two separate years-long market manipulation schemes,” said U.S. Attorney John H. Durham of the District of Connecticut.  “Not only will the company pay a substantial financial penalty and return money to victims, but this agreement requires JPMorgan to self-report violations of the federal anti-fraud laws and cooperate in any future criminal investigations.  I thank the FBI for its dedication in investigating these deceptive trading practices and other sophisticated financial crimes.”

“For nearly a decade, a significant number of JP Morgan traders and sales personnel openly disregarded U.S. laws that serve to protect against illegal activity in the marketplace,” said Assistant Director in Charge William F. Sweeney Jr. of the FBI’s New York Field Office.  “Today's deferred prosecution agreement, in which JP Morgan Chase and Co. agreed to pay nearly one billion dollars in penalties and victim compensation, is a stark reminder to others that allegations of this nature will be aggressively investigated and pursued.”

According to admissions and court documents, between approximately March 2008 and August 2016, numerous traders and sales personnel on JPMorgan’s precious metals desk located in New York, London, and Singapore engaged in a scheme to defraud in connection with the purchase and sale of gold, silver, platinum, and palladium futures contracts (collectively, precious metals futures contracts) that traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange Inc. and Commodity Exchange Inc., which are commodities exchanges operated by the CME Group Inc.  In tens of thousands of instances, traders on the precious metals desk placed orders to buy and sell precious metals futures contracts with the intent to cancel those orders before execution, including in an attempt to profit by deceiving other market participants through injecting false and misleading information concerning the existence of genuine supply and demand for precious metals futures contracts.  In addition, on certain occasions, traders on the precious metals desk engaged in trading activity that was intended to deliberately trigger or defend barrier options held by JPMorgan and thereby avoid losses.

One of the traders on the precious metals desk, John Edmonds, 38, of Brooklyn, New York, pleaded guilty on Oct. 9, 2018, to one count of commodities fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, commodities fraud, commodities price manipulation, and spoofing, and his sentencing, at this time, has not been scheduled before U.S. District Judge Robert N. Chatigny of the District of Connecticut.  Another one of the traders on the precious metals desk, Christian Trunz, 35, of New York, New York, pleaded guilty on Aug. 20, 2019, to one count of conspiracy to engage in spoofing and one count of spoofing in connection with his precious metals futures contracts trading at JPMorgan and another financial services firm, and his sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 28, 2021, before U.S. District Judge Sterling Johnson of the Eastern District of New York. 

Finally, as part of the investigation, the department obtained a superseding indictment on Nov. 15, 2019 against three former JPMorgan traders, Gregg Smith, Michael Nowak, and Christopher Jordan, and one former salesperson, Jeffrey Ruffo, in the Northern District of Illinois that charged them for their alleged participation in a racketeering conspiracy and other federal crimes in connection with the manipulation of the precious metals futures contracts markets.  An indictment is merely an allegation and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

Also according to admissions and court documents, between approximately April 2008 and January 2016, traders on JPMorgan’s U.S. Treasuries desk located in New York and London engaged in a scheme to defraud in connection with the purchase and sale of U.S. Treasury futures contracts that traded on the Chicago Board of Trade, which is a commodities exchange operated by the CME Group Inc., and of U.S. Treasury notes and bonds traded in the secondary cash market (the U.S. Treasury futures, notes, and bonds, collectively, U.S. Treasury Products).  In thousands of instances, traders on the U.S. Treasuries desk placed orders to buy and sell U.S. Treasury Products with the intent to cancel those orders before execution, including in an attempt to profit by deceiving other market participants through injecting false and misleading information concerning the existence of genuine supply and demand for U.S. Treasury Products.

As part of the DPA, JPMorgan, and its subsidiaries JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. (JPMC) and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC (JPMS) have agreed to, among other things, continue to cooperate with the Fraud Section and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Connecticut in any ongoing or future investigations and prosecutions concerning JPMorgan, JPMC, JPMS, and their subsidiaries and affiliates, and their officers, directors, employees and agents.  As part of its cooperation,  JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS are required to report evidence or allegations of conduct which may constitute a violation of the wire fraud statute, the anti-fraud, anti-spoofing and/or anti-manipulation provisions of the Commodity Exchange Act, the securities and commodities fraud statute, and federal securities laws prohibiting manipulative and deceptive devices.  In addition, JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS have also agreed to enhance their compliance program where necessary and appropriate, and to report to the government regarding remediation and implementation of their enhanced compliance program.

The department reached this resolution with JPMorgan based on a number of factors, including the nature and seriousness of the offense conduct, which spanned eight years and involved tens of thousands of instances of unlawful trading activity; JPMorgan’s failure to fully and voluntarily self‑disclose the offense conduct to the department; JPMorgan’s prior criminal history, including a guilty plea on May 20, 2015, for similar misconduct involving manipulative and deceptive trading practices in the foreign currency exchange spot market (FX Guilty Plea); and the fact that substantially all of the offense conduct occurred prior to the FX Guilty Plea. 

JPMorgan received credit for its cooperation with the department’s investigation and for the remedial measures taken by JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS, including suspending and ultimately terminating individuals involved in the offense conduct, adopting heightened internal controls, and substantially increasing the resources devoted to compliance.  Significantly, since the time of the offense conduct, and following the FX Guilty Plea, JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS engaged in a systematic effort to reassess and enhance their market conduct compliance program and internal controls.  These enhancements included hiring hundreds of new compliance officers, improving their anti-fraud and manipulation training and policies, revising their trade and electronic communications surveillance programs, implementing tools and processes to facilitate closer supervision of traders, taking into account employees’ commitment to compliance in promotion and compensation decisions, and implementing independent quality assurance testing of non-escalated and escalated surveillance alerts.  Based on JPMorgan’s, JPMC’s and JPMS’ remediation and the state of their compliance program, the department determined that an independent compliance monitor was unnecessary. 

Today, the CFTC announced a separate settlement with JPMorgan, JPMC, and JPMS in connection with a related, parallel proceeding.  Under the terms of that resolution, JPMorgan agreed to pay approximately $920 million, which includes a civil monetary penalty of approximately $436 million, as well as restitution and disgorgement that will be credited to any such payments made to the department under the DPA.  Also, the SEC announced today a separate settlement with JPMS in connection with a related, parallel proceeding regarding trading activity in the secondary cash market for U.S. Treasury notes and bonds.  Under the terms of that resolution, JPMS agreed to pay $10 million in disgorgement and a civil monetary penalty of $25 million.

The FBI’s New York Field Office investigated this case.  Assistant Chief Avi Perry and Trial Attorney Matthew F. Sullivan of the Fraud Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Jonathan Francis of the District of Connecticut prosecuted the case.  

Individuals who believe that they may be a victim in this case should visit the Fraud Section’s Victim Witness website at https://www.justice.gov/criminal-vns/case/jpmorgan-dpa or call (888) 549-3945.

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice.  Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

Источник: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/jpmorgan-chase-co-agrees-pay-920-million-connection-schemes-defraud-precious-metals-and-us

Data Breach Weekly Security Report: Which company lost control of your details this week

Welcome to GearBrain's Weekly Data Breach Report, a collection of known breaches into company databases where someone you don't know got access to your personal information. The frequency at which these break-ins happen appears to be growing, so every week we'll update our report with fresh news on the latest hacks and links on where you can go if there's action to be taken — whether you're concerned about your privacy or not.

This week we're looking at a data breach at clothing maker Guess, another at a dermatology company that may have affected 2.4 million people, and a new $10 million award from the White House to thwart ransomware.

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Guess

Guess jeans

Guess has admitted to a data breach

iStock/Getty Images

Clothing maker Guess has said that it was breached, with hackers making off with driver's license numbers, passport details, Social Security numbers and more, according to Bleeping Computer. The breach happened between Feb 2, 2021 and Feb 23, 2021. Some people, affected, have been sent letters about the breach which the company reportedly started mailing out on June 9.

Forefront Dermatology

electronic medical records

A healthcare company based in Wisconsin has reported a data breach

iStock/Getty Images

A Wisconsin-based healthcare company, Forefront Dermatology, has stated that its network had a breach that may have allowed access to personal details including patient names, dates of birth and even their medical treatment information, according to PortSwigger. An estimated 2.4 million people may have been affected.

$10 million ransomware awards

White House

The White House has created a $10 million award for information about ransomware

iStock/Getty Images

The White House is going to start offering rewards to those who can supply information about cyber crimes, including ransomware, that are being leveled against the U.S. companies and infrastructure, according to the Associated Press. The reward will be upwards of $10 million, and it's part of a new push by the Biden administration to help thwart attacks before they even begin. This includes a new web site, stopransomware.gov, that is a guide educating people about ransomware and how they can better protect themselves against this kind of attack and get help if they are affected.

Week of July 5, 2021: Kaseya

Computer hack

The hackers are demanding a $70M ransom

Getty Images/iStock

This week saw a ransomware attack on a Florida-based information technology firm, which saw the seizure of masses of data and the demand of a $70M ransom payment.

Claimed to be one of the largest ransomware attacks of all time, the event affected hundreds of businesses worldwide, from supermarkets in Sweden to schools in New Zealand, reports the Guardian. Generally speaking, Kaseya's services were used by companies too small to have their own IT departments, and it was systems used to protect customers from malicious software that were attacked. It is estimated that between 800 and 1,500 small businesses were affected by the incident, which saw their data accessed by ransomware hackers.

Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

The attack affected Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

iStock

Next up, we have an incident that took place at the Northwestern Memorial HealthCare (NMHC). A data breach by Elekta, at a third-party provider used by NMHC has potentially exposed patient information, including patient names, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, health insurance information and medical record numbers.

The Chicago-based healthcare provider said: "On May 17, 2021, Elekta informed us that an unauthorized individual gained access to its systems between April 2, 2021 and April 20, 2021 and, during that time, acquired a copy of the database that stores some oncology patient information."

Financial account and payment card information was not involved, NMHC said, adding that the incident "did not involve access NMHC's systems, network, or electronic health records."

Morgan Stanley

The attack affected the server of a third-party vendor used by Morgan Stanley

iStock

Finally this week, investment banking firm Morgan Stanley reported a data breach after attackers stole customer information during an attack on the Accellion FTA server of a third-party vendor. Morgan Stanley was notified by Guidehouse, a provider of account maintenance services, in May 2021 that its Accellion FTA server had been compromised.

Morgan Stanley said in a letter: "There was no data security breach of any Morgan Stanley applications. The incident involves files which were in Guidehouse's possession, including encrypted files from Morgan Stanley."

It is good news that the data is encrypted, but the stolen trove still contains stock plan participants' names, addresses, dates of birth, Social Security numbers and corporate company names.

Week of June 28, 2021: Linked In

LinkedIn

Data from LinkedIn is reportedly up for sale on a hacker site

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Data from 92 percent of LinkedIn users is reportedly for sale, according to Privacy Sharks, a VPN review site, which found 700 million records from LinkedIn on a hacker forum.

The data includes details from email addresses to gender, names and phone numbers. But LinkedIn told the news site that the details did not come from a data breach and did not include private details from LinkedIn members.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz reported that some customer data was left exposed on a cloud platform

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Carmaker Mercedes-Benz found that data on some customers and potential buyers was left open on a cloud platform, the company stated. The details of the data included in some cases of self-reported credit scores, credit card information, birth dates, social security numbers and some drivers clines numbers. But they affected fewer than 1,000 people and was information they had entered on to dealer and Mercedes-Benz websites between January 1, 2014 and June 19, 2017.

Herff Jones

Herff Jones

Herff Jones found "suspicious activity" around payment card details

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Yearbook supplier Herff Jones is getting in touch with customers about a breach that may have affected their payment card details. The company found about what they called "suspicious activity" in May, and began investigating finding "theft of certain customers' payment information."

Anyone who believes they've been affected can reach out to the company through its web site, and can Herff Jones is also offering free credit monitoring.

Week of June 21, 2021: Office 365 malware phish

Microsoft is warning people that a group is tricking Office 365 users into downloading a malware Excel file that then gives them a back door into someone's Windows device, reports ZDNet. The initial reach comes via email telling people that they have already downloaded a free version of software and unless they call they will be forced to start paying. This prompts people to place a call to the number in the email.

The malware itself is said to be used to push out ransomware, and Microsoft's own security team is now tracking the malware as well.

Illinois Department of Transportation warns of phish

The Illinois Department of Transportation is also warning people not to respond to emails claiming to be from their agency and asking for personal information, reports local news site 23WIFR. People are reporting that texts and emails are being sent — purporting to be from the DOT, and telling people to delete the messages and crucially not click on any link in them as well.

The agency has told people that they would never reach out through these avenues asking for personal information such as Social Security numbers or even banking account details.

Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training

Over in Rhode Island, the state's Department of Labor and Training is also warning people about email phishes as well, reports local news channel 10WJAR. The emails are asking people to verify their professional license — not something the agency says it would ask people in this manner either.

Their advice? Delete the email without clicking on any links.

Week of June 14, 2021: Wegmans

Wegmans, a chain of grocery stores, has had a data breach that the company says may have left data available for people to find including their home and email addresses, phone numbers, their Shoppers Club numbers, birthdates dates and more.

The details also included passwords to shoppers accounts on Wegman's web site, but the company said these were hashed and salted and therefore the characters were not visible.

Wegmans was alerted to the breach by a third-party security researcher and it confirmed the issue on its own on April 19, 2021. They're suggesting people change the passwords on their Wegmans' accounts.

CVS

More than one billion search records done on CVS Pharmacy's web site were available online — and left visible — this spring, according to ABC News, which credits a cybersecurity researcher, Jeremiah Fowler, with finding the issue.

The records are specific to terms people were searching for on CVS Pharmacy's web site, and Fowler found the breach in March, notifying the company. These details include information people were looking for on Covid-19 vaccines, and Fowler said in some instances people put in their email address into the search — which was visible in the records.

CVS admitted to ABC News that the search information was connected to them. They added the breach stemmed from a third-party vendor which had been hosting the information, and that CVS has now shut down that database.

Alibaba

Online shopping site Alibaba was hit with a data leak, which grabbed about 1.1 billion details from users, according the The Wall Street Journal. The data included user names and mobile phone numbers and was grabbed through a crawler, a program that reads through data details, according to news accounts.

The crawler reportedly came from an affiliate marketing outlet, and was taken from Alibaba's shopping outlet Taobao over a period of several months, while Alibaba itself was not made aware of the details until July 2020.

Week of June 7, 2021: Beef supplier JBS

JBS, a supplier of beef to customers worldwide, paid out nearly $11 million in bitcoin to hackers after a ransomware attack shut down its plants in the U.S. and Australia.

Ransomware attacks are a way for hackers to hold a company's data, demanding payment before it's released. A recent ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline caused a shut down along the East Coast before the company paid out $4.4 million. Much of that money was recovered by the Justice Department.

Arnoff Moving & Storage

An East Coast-based moving company Arnoff Moving & Storage has been reportedly hacked, with its data held for ransomware. The details the hackers claim to have in their possession include customer payments, as well as a subcontractor's W-9 which includes tax identification.

NYC Law Department

The New York City Law Department was hacked freezing employees's access into their accounts. The department includes lawyers who serve the city on issues ranging from real estate leases to acting as legal counsel for city officials.

Both the FBI and the New York Police Department are involved trying to investigate what happened — and where to go from there. The shut down, which was first detected Saturday night, had been continuing into the week.

Week of May 31: Klarna

Klarna users reported this week how they were being mistakenly logged out, then greeted with the accounts of others when logging back in. A buy-now-pay-later company, and Europe's largest private fintec company, Klarna is reportedly close to securing a deal that would value the firm at $40bn.

The information greeting customers included randomized postal addresses and past purchases, as well as partial bank card details, of other users. One user tweeted four screenshots to demonstrate how they were shown a different user each time they logged in. Klarna issued a statement on June 2 to say the issue was not the result of an external attack, and said a maximum of 9,500 customers were affected, having previously pegged that figure at 90,000.

AMT Games

A claimed 1.47TB of data, including personal details belonging to 5.9 million people, has emerged online, feely accessible without encryption or a password. The data, which includes email addresses, IP addresses, Facebook data and more, belongs to customers of AMT Games, a mobile and browser game developer based in China.

Discovered by security researchers from WizCase, the data numbers in the millions and was accessible to anyone who had the link to its location online, WizCase said, adding that the link has since been secured but without a response from AMT Games. Titles produced by the company include Battle For The Galaxy and Heroes of War.

WizCase said the database "leaked approximately 5.9 million player profiles, two million transactions and 587,000 feedback messages. Feedback message data contained account ID, feedback rating given and users' email addresses."

Scripps

Scripps, a healthcare provider in California, informed more than 147,000 people this week that their personal data may have been exposed to a recent cyberattack. The company took parts of its network offline after a ransomware attack was discovered in early May, leading to four weeks of disruption to patient appointments.

Data that may have been exposed by the attack include health information, social security numbers, driver's license numbers and financial information, Infosecurity Magazine reported.

Scripps told patients this week: "Importantly, this incident did not result in unauthorized access to Scripps' electronic medical record application, Epic. However, health information and personal financial information was acquired through other documents stored on our network...For the less than 2.5 percent of individuals whose social security number and/or driver's license number were involved, we will be providing complimentary credit monitoring and identity protection support activities."

Week of May 24, 2021: Bose

Bose, maker of audio speakers, was hit by what the company refers to as a "sophisticated cyber-incident," that pushed ransomware into its U.S. systems, according to Bleeping Computer, which posted a letter from Bose to the Consumer Protection Bureau. Bose reported in the letter that it first became aware of the concern in March 2021, and then worked with "cyber experts," to figure out if data from its systems had been exposed.

The investigation found that data from six former employees in New Hampshire was "accessed," the company wrote, but consumer data is not mentioned.

New cybersecurity regulations

Following the ransomware attack that brought down the Colonial pipeline for days, impacting gas supplies across some of the East Coast, the Department of Homeland Security is now going to set up new rules that pipeline companies have to follow regarding cyber concerns, reports The Washington Post.

That means that there will be new systems in place — more than the current guidelines — these companies will have to follow regarding cyber concerns. They will also have new actions that they'll have to take if they're attacked as well, including notifying both the Transportation Security Administration and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.

Apple macOS update

A new Apple update, macOS 11.4, did more than just push out ways to purchase Apple Podcasts to computers, it also addressed some important security concerns, ZDNet reports.

The new update includes a patch, a fix that addresses a vulnerability on the macOS that was allowing malware to work around privacy settings. The bug was allowing screenshots to be taken of someone's desktop, without needing permission, wrote ZDNet, quoting a Security firm Jamf's posting.

This only underscores why everyone needs to be updating their operating systems — whether on a computer, smartphone or other smart device — regularly, and automatically.

Week of May 17, 2021: Eufy Security

This week saw a major privacy blunder at Eufy Security, a maker of smart home devices, including indoor and outdoor security cameras. The incident, blamed by Eufy on a bug caused during a server update, saw over 700 customers able to view the live security camera feeds of other Eufy users. The incident lasted for approximately one hour and 40 minutes, and during that time users reported how they could view strangers' security cameras, and even record footage to their own smartphones using the Eufy Security app.

Users in the United States, New Zealand, Australia, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina were all affected. Eufy has apologized for the incident, saying: "We realize that as a security company we didn't do good enough. We are sorry we felt [sic] short here and are working on new security protocols and measures to make sure that this never happens again."

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Health Service Executive, Ireland

This week also saw the head of the Republic of Ireland's health service describe the "catastrophic" impact of a "stomach-churning" hack of its IT systems. Paul Reid, chief executive of Health Service Executives described the ransomware attack as a "callous act," which led to healthcare workers resorting to pen and paper while IT systems were recovered. A similar attack struck the Irish Department of Health a week earlier.

In scenes that echoed the Wannacry ransomware attack on the UK's National Health Service in 2017, many outpatient services were cancelled. Irish Prime Minister (Taoiseach) Micheál Martin told the BBC: "It's a shocking attack on a health service, but fundamentally on the patients and the Irish public,."

The Financial Times reported how health records were being shared online – a claim Irish Communications Minister Eamon Ryan described as "very credible".

Verizon 2021 Data Breach Investigations Report

Lastly this week, Verizon published its annual Data Breach Investigations Report. Covering the last 12 months, the report analyzed 29,207 cybersecurity incidents, of which 5,258 were data breaches – a third more than the previous year. According to the report, which can be read here and summarised by Solutions Review here, phishing attacks increased by 11 percent since the previous year, while ransomware attacks rose by six percent.

Furthermore, a huge 85 percent of breaches involved a human elements, raising questions over the public's ability to spot a cybersecurity incident, and highlighting a lack of training and education on how cyberattacks take place. Four in five incidents were spotted by an outside party and not by the victim.

Week of May 10: Colonial Pipeline

Anyone living along the southeast coordinator of the United States, has likely seen or felt the impact of a reported ransomware attack that hit Colonial Pipeline. The company first reported the attack late last week, in early May, and had shut down its operations as result, which moves more than 100 million gallons of fuel across parts of the U.S., wrote CBS News. The company was able to restart the pipeline this week, on Wednesday, but has warned people that getting back up to speed with gasoline supplies to stations could take many more days.

Pennsylvania Covid-19 contract tracing

A breach of Covid-19 contract tracing details may have exposed private data of about 72,000 people, according to a statement from the Pennsylvania attorney general, and reported by the Associated Press. The information was stored with a contact tracing vendor, Insight Global, which has reportedly admitted that people working for it shared Information, including people's names who may have been exposed to Covid-19 as well as symptoms, among possibly other details, via Google accounts that were not authorized. Pennsylvania's Attorney General Josh Shapiro has stated his office is investigating

Microsoft 365

Egress, a software company that focuses on data breaches, has issued a security report, stating that it believes 85 percent of organizations that use Microsoft 365 have had an email data breach in the last 12 months. The report, Outbound Email: Microsoft 365's Security Blind Spot, noted that 15 percent of organizations that use Microsoft 365 had more than 500 data breach in the last year, as compared to just 4 percent of companies that had not used it.

The report was compiled from interviews with 500 IT leaders and 3,000 remote workers in the US and the UK in financial services, healthcare and legal.

Week of May 3, 2021: Peloton

It was revealed this week that, in January, security researcher Jen Masters, from Pen Test Partners, reported to Peloton how the up-market exercise bike had a data problem. Masters had discovered that it was possible for anyone to view the personal details of any Peloton user, even if they had their account set to private and had no friends on the exercise platform. Due to an API fault, it was possible to view any Peloton user's age, gender, city, weight and workout statistics.

Mistakes happen, but the bigger issue here was how Peloton did not respond to Masters and did not fix the problem within the industry-standard 90 days Masters gave the company before making his findings public. Peloton has since fixed the issue and apologised for its slow response. "We took action, and addressed the issues based on his initial submissions," Peloton said. "But we were slow to update the researcher about our remediation efforts. Going forward, we will do better to work collaboratively with the security research community and respond more promptly when vulnerabilities are reported."

You can read more about this incident in a blog post on the Pen Test Partners website.

Amazon fake reviews scam

This is an interesting data breach, as the exposure of this data also shed light on an Amazon review scam. The exposed 7GB database contained over 13 millions records related to how an Amazon scam review system works. In a bid to gain 5-star reviews for products, sellers contact Amazon users, tell them which products to buy, then refund them the cost through PayPal once a positive, 5-star review has been posted to Amazon. The seller gets a 5-star review for their products, and the customer gets fully refunded for the items they buy.

The database potentially implicates more than 200,000 people in the scam, according to Safety Detectives, which discovered the database on an ElasticSearch server with no password or encryption. Exposed data includes the email addresses and phone numbers of vendors, as well as PayPal account details, email addresses and usernames of reviewers. Over 230,000 Gmail email addresses were also exposed by the unprotected server.

NHS

Finally this week, Britain's National Health Service website was found to exposed details on whether a citizen has had their Covid-19 vaccine or not. Discovered by the Guardian, the fault was found in an NHS website used to book vaccinations. The issue is how a person's vaccination status was exposed by the website to anyone who either new the persons's NHS number, or basic information about them. In theory, an employer could find out if someone had had their vaccine or not, with knowing only basic identity information about the person.

"This is a seriously shocking failure to protect patients' medical confidentiality at a time when it could not be more important," said Silkie Carlo, the director of privacy group Big Brother Watch. "This online system has left the population's Covid vaccine statuses exposed to absolutely anyone to pry into. Date of birth and postcode are fields of data that can be easily found or bought, even on the electoral roll."

Week of April 26, 2021: DigitalOcean

DigitalOcean, a cloud-based firm for developers, is warning customers about a data breach that exposed information connected to their billing details. The company is stating that the error that allowed the hacker to get inside has been fixed, but over two weeks they were able to see people's names and addresses associated with their bills as well as the last four digits of any card used to pay their accounts as well, reports Tech Crunch.

DigitalOcean is a service that developers will tap to allow the to create and write programs, and have them stored in the company's cloud as they work. And while passwords were not involved in the breach, nor the actual DigitalOcean account, 1 percent of billing profiles were involved and also included expiration dates and the name of the bank that a payment card was connected to as well.

University of California

A data breach of University of California students' personal details is now showing up on the dark web, according to some students, including at least one alumna, themselves. Some of this information includes Social Security numbers, email and home addresses and also phone numbers, reports The Daily Californian.

The University of California was caught up in the Accellion cyberattack, which precipitated the loss of information of its own community. The UC system is offering a free year of credit monitoring, but some of those affected have raised concerns that this is not sufficient.

JPMorgan Chase Bank

A new phishing attack is making the rounds going after customers of JPMorgan Chase Bank. These phishing attempts are building off details found on social media — which appear to be posted by customers — and gleaning those pieces of information to better tune their attacks, reports Infosecurity Magazine.

One of the attacks actually claims to be a credit card statement, telling customers that their details can now be read. That link takes them to a fake web site, that looks like it's coming from Chase, and asks them to type in their user name and password. But the name of the bank is spelled slightly wrong, with a space between the JP and the Morgan, (which is wrong), and the letter "P"not capitalized.

People should take some time to make sure they're taking steps to try and protect themselves from phishing attacks.

Week of April 19, 2021: Apple

Apple was this week targeted by a $50 million ransomeware attack, after a trove of engineering and manufacturing schematics of its products were stolen from manufacturing partner Quanta. The Taiwanese company manufacturers MacBooks and other products for Apple and the stolen data related to current and future devices, The Record reported.

The leak was reportedly carried out by Russian hacking group REvil, which is also known as Sodinokibi. The stolen images were published online on April 20 to coincide with Apple's Spring Loaded product launch event, after Quanta refused to pay the $50m random demand. The hackers now hope that Apple will pay up, before more images are set to be leaked on May 1.

Douglas Elliman Property Management

Thousands of New York residents learned this month that they may have had their personal information compromised. The data breach stems from Douglas Elliman Property Management, whose three managing directors emailed hundreds of co-operative and condominium boards at the start of the week, advising them about an IT network breach, reports The Real Deal.

Elliman is one of the largest residential property management firms in New York City, representing 390 properties and over 45,000 units as of 2018.

The email said how the firm has detected "suspicious activity" on its IT system on April 7, and had contacted law enforcement. It was said how an unauthorized party gained access to the network, including files containing the personal data or owners and employees. This data may have included names, dates of birth, mailing addresses, Social Security numbers, driver's license numbers, passport numbers and financial information.

Geico

Finally, this week saw the reporting of a data breach at the Geico insurance company that left customers' driver's license numbers exposed online for more than a month. The incident was detailed in a data breach notice filed with the attorney general of California, and first reported by TechCrunch.

"We recently determined that between January 21, 2021 and March 1, 2021, fraudsters used information about you – which they acquired elsewhere – to obtain unauthorized access to your driver's license number through the online sales system on our website," the notice said.

It went on: "We have reason to believe that this information could be used to fraudulently apply for unemployment benefits in your name." Geico does not say how many customers may have been affected by the data breach, but says the error has now been fixed.

Week of April 12, 2021: ParkMobile

It's difficult when the app designed to save drivers one of their biggest headaches creates another. But that's exactly what happened when to those who use a very popular app, ParkMobile, which millions of people throughout North American can use to digitally pay for their parking spot on the street. The app's customer data has been breached and is for sale on a crime forum, according to KrebsOnSecurity.

To create an app, drivers have to input the typical — personal — details including phone numbers, email address and in some cases mailing addresses. And because this app helps ensure a driver's specific car has paid for its parking, license plate numbers have been breached as well. ParkMobile apparently knew at least by March 26 about the issue, because they put out a security report. But they did not tell people to go in and change their password. Which we're telling you to do. Now.

Houston Rockets

The NBA's Houston Rockets, are getting hit with a ransomware attack to reclaim business details about the basketball team, said Bloomberg, which confirmed the news. The team said it prevented some ransomware attempts from being installed on its system, but not all. And the hackers have publicly stated they have some details including contracts, financial information and non-disclosure agreements, and will publish them if they don't get paid. How successful is this particularly hacking group? They reportedly got one victim to pay $85,000.

W2 phishing lures

People are getting phishing emails claiming to be a file regarding a Home Loan, with a link that purports to have their 2020 Tax Returns and a W2 attached. That's the lure. But when people click on the link, they're presented with a form which asks them to put their email details — including password — to get into the file. That, clearly, doesn't open the file as it doesn't exist. Instead, people have just given hackers access to their email account.

Key here is not to click on links in emails almost ever. Even if an email comes from a tested source, these can be spoofed — or faked — and a better course of action is to call the person and confirm that they've actually sent the email you've received.

Week of April 5, 2021: Facebook

This week began with the discovery of the personal details of 533 million Facebook users in a hacking forum. The freely-available data include phone numbers, names and dates of birth from users across 106 countries, with 32 million US citizens implicated. The data came from a vulnerability that was patched by Facebook in August 2019. Facebook has confirmed the legitimacy of the data but says it will not be informing uses that have had their details exposed by the breach.

Instead, users can check if they have been caught up in the breach by entering their phone number into the Have I Been Pwned website, an online tool that cross-references data against data breaches.

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More than 500M Facebook users have had details leaked online

Booking.com

Travel website Booking.com has been fined €475,000 (approximately $560,000) due to breaching GDPR law when failing to report a data breach within 72 hours. The company suffered a data breach in 2018 and discovered on January 13, 2019 that the details belonging to 4,100 users had been stolen. But instead of reporting the data breach to regulator within three days, Booking.com waited until February 7 to disclose the incident.

Due to the breach in Europe's data protection laws, Netherlands-based Booking.com was issued with the fine. The Dutch Data Protection Authority said: "This is a serious violation. A data breach can unfortunately happen anywhere, even if you have taken good precautions. But to prevent damage to your customers and the recurrence of such a data breach, you have to report this on time."

Michigan State University

Michigan State University (MSU) this week said it has been implicated in a data breach stemming from a cyber-attack on Ohio law firm Bricker & Eckler LLP. The firm was hit by a ransomware attack in January 2021, where an unauthorised party gained access to internal systems over the second half of the month. Exposed data may have included names, addresses and some medical-related and educational-related information, plus driver's licence numbers and, in some cases, Social Security numbers.

It was then reported by Lansing State Journal that the data breach saw the exposure of Title IX case information belonging to just under 350 people at MSU, reports Lansing State Journal. Bricker said in a statement: "A limited number of individuals, some of whom are no longer affiliated with MSU, may have been impacted. Those individuals have been contacted and connected with the proper resources."

Week of March 29, 2021: IRS refund

Hackers are reportedly sending emails targeting college students and universities that use a ".edu" email, claiming to be the Internal Revenue Service and offering tax payers a way to check on the status of their refunds.

The emails, which have different subject lines including "Tax Refund Payment" or "Recalculation of your tax refund payment" then have a link, which when clicked takes people to a phishing site. There, they're asked for details including Social Security number, driver's license number, address, birth date, name and more. Tellingly these are data points the IRS does ask for on its own site — which means hackers could use this information to then reroute legitimate refunds to themselves.

Got one of these emails? You can save the email using the "save as" option, and send that as an attachment to [email protected]

University of Maryland + University of California

A ransomware attack appears to be going on against the University of Maryland and the University of California, according to ZDNet. Screenshots of passports, a federal tax document, an application for tuition remission and more have appeared, presumably grabbed by the hackers, and show Social Security numbers, birth dates, immigration status and other personal details.

Ubiquiti

In January 2021, Ubiquiti, which makes networking devices like routers, had reported a breach of its systems that had been hosted by a third-party. At the time, the company said that they were "aware of evidence of access to databases that host user data." Now, Krebs on Security, reports that a whistleblower has said the breach was actually "catastrophic," and that the claim of a third-party being the one targeted — and not Ubiquiti — "…was a fabrication."

Instead, hackers got complete access to the Ubiquiti's databases via Amazon Web Services, which is what the whistleblower says the company pointed to as the third party. Hackers then were able to get into all databases, all user database details and more. Those details reportedly could have allowed hackers to authenticate any of Ubiquiti's cloud-based devices. Which is again a reason to : Change. Your. Password.

Week of March 22, 2021: FatFace

British clothing retailer FatFace this week told its customers that it has been the victim of a data breach – then asked them to keep the matter private. The breach occurred on January 17, two months before the company informed its customers that an unspecified amount of data including names, email and postal addresses, and the last four digits and expiry date of their credit cards, had been compromised.

FatFace said the two-month delay in disclosing the breach was due to identifying who was involved in the incident and what data was involved. The company said: "This identification effort was comprehensive and coordinated by our external security experts; it therefore took time to thoroughly analyze and categorize the data to ensure we can provide the most accurate information possible."

The company then asked affected customers to "keep this email and the information included within it strictly private and confidential."

As security expert Graham Clueley said this week: "What a shame FatFace hadn't been quite so cautious about the privacy and confidentiality of its customer".

Solairus Aviation

Next up this week, we have air charter firm Solairus Aviation, which announced on March 23 that it had suffered a data breach. Some employee and customer data was compromised in an incident at third-party vendor Avianis, an aviation business management platform provider.

Data store by Solairus with Avianis included employee and client names, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, driver's licence numbers, passport numbers and financial account numbers. The company said in a message to customers: "Solairus regrets the inconvenience or concern this incident may cause you. Every member of the Solairus community is important, and Solairus values your security and privacy."

Shell

Oil and gas company Shell announced on March 16 that it had suffered a data breach related to an incident involving Accellion's file transfer application, which is used by Shell to securely transfer large data files.

Shell said in a statement: "Upon learning of the incident, Shell addressed the vulnerabilities with its service provider and cyber security team, and started an investigation to better understand the nature and extent of the incident. There is no evidence of any impact to Shell's core IT systems as the file transfer service is isolated from the rest of Shell's digital infrastructure."

The company did not say how many individuals were affected by the data breach, but said an unknown actor gained access to "various files" during the breach. This included personal data and information "from Shell companies and some of their stakeholders."

Week of March 15, 2021: WeLeakInfo

In a reversal many may say is fair, WeLeakInfo — a site where people once went to buy stolen data — leaked the details on those who have made purchases from them. Data on more than 24,000 users was found in an archived ZIP file, according to TechRadar, and is now on sale.

The information stems from sales made over Stripe, which is an online payment system, and includes names, IP addresses, physical addresses, and some credit card details. There are also the dates the transactions happened, Stripe reference numbers and phone numbers.

New York Unemployment

New Yorkers applying for unemployment may have been caught in a phishing scam that captured not only their details — but also actual personal documents. The scam worked over text and email, and if someone clicked on the link, it sent to them a site that looked exactly like the website where people apply for unemployment through New York. Except this site was a fake, according to CBS.

After logging on as they would for unemployment (which then captured their username and password), the fake site asked for documents, further netting Social Security cards and driver's licenses among other details.

Rule of thumb? When going to state or federal web sites, type the URL into Google — do not click on a link.

Traffic ticket

Another attack that starts with luring victims to click a rogue link comes through a traffic ticket email. People are sent an email with a subject line that claims they've earned a ticket. There's a link in the email which sends them to a rogue site — where they're told to click on a photo to see proof of their violation, says ZDNet.

That link though actually puts malware on their computer — one called Trickbot, known for being used as a banking trojan — which can steal login details on Windows computers.

Again: please do not click on links in emails.

Week of March 8, 2021: Microsoft

Microsoft said on March 8 how it was still seeing "multiple actors" taking advantage of unpatched systems to attack organizations that used its Exchange Server platform. The update came almost a week after the computer giant first announced it has detected multiple zero-day exploits being used to attack on-premises versions of Exchange Server in what it called "limited and targeted attacks."

The computer giant attributed the attack "with high confidence" to HAFNIUM, a group said to be state-sponsored and operating out of China. The White House later users computer network operators to take further steps to ensure their systems are safe, as patches released by Microsoft were found to still leave serious vulnerabilities. The White House said: "We can't stress enough that patching and mitigation is not remediation if the servers have already been compromised, and it is essential that any organization with a vulnerable server take measures ti determine if they were already targeted."

Netgain

It was found this week that a cyberattack on cloud hosting and IT service provider Netgain now affects an additional 210,000 Americans. Minnesota-based Netgain Technologies had to take down some of its data centers following a cyberattack in November 2020.

Netgain provides services to several companies in the healthcare and accounting sectors, and admitted in December that health informations of patients from Woodcreek Provider Service was stored on servers affected by the attack. The information included names, addresses, medical record numbers, dates of birth, social security numbers, insurance claims, clinical notes, invoices, bank account numbers, DEA certificates, and some medical records, among other data.

Verkada

Finally this week, a hacking collective breached a database containing the video feeds of security cameras collected by Verkada, a technology startup based in Silicon Valley. The trove of data included live feeds of 150,000 security cameras situated in sensitive locations like schools, police departments, hospitals, prisons and businesses. Bloomberg reported that high profile firms exposed by the breach included Tesla and Cloudfare.

It was reported that the data breach was carried out by hackers who wanted to demonstrate how easily such surveillance systems could be broken into.

Verkada said: "Our internal security team and external security firm are investigating the scale and scope of this issue, and we have notified law enforcement."

Week of March 1, 2021: Malaysia Airlines

Malaysia Airlines has had a nearly decade-long data breach that ended up revealing the details about members of its frequent flyer program, Enrich, from their names to their gender.

The airlines has admitted to the breach and said it was notified by a third-party IT service provider about the issue which took place between March 2010 and June 2019, according to Bleeping Computer. While passwords were not involved, said Malaysia Airlines, members' contact information, their rewards tier level, their frequent flyer number and their birthdays were part of the breach.

Over Twitter, the airline stated this as well, that its computer systems were not involved in the breach, but instead happened on a third-party's network. And the airline further encouraged members to change their passwords.

SITA

The airline passenger system, SITA, got hit by a data breach, the company stated on March 4. Involved in the attack, with SITA said happened February 24, 2021, is passenger data was breached. SITA handles details for multiple areas of the airline industry from baggage to passenger processing and the company claims to have about 90 percent of the airlines in the world as its customers.

Qualys

Qualys, a cloud security and compliance firm, has confirmed that a hack of Accellion, the one that caught a number of other firms including grocer Kroger, has affected them as well.

While the company says operations were not affected, the exploit did affect information that was "part of our customer support system," said the firm in a statement. The company also found that some files were accessed without permission that had been "hosted on the Accellion FTA server," they said. Qualys also stated it had notified "the limited number of customers impacted by this unauthorized access."

Week of February 22, 2021: Kroger

Kroger recently announced it has fallen victim to a data breach that struck at Accellion, a third-party firm providing a file transfer tool. The grocery store is in the process of contacting customers who might have been affected by the breach, which it says has presented no indication of fraud or misuse of personal information.

Krogen stopped using Accellion's service after being informed of the breach in late-January 2021, reported the incident to the authorities, and began a forensic investigation.

Kroger said: "No credit or debit card information or customer account passwords were affected by this incident...While Kroger has no indication of fraud or misuse of personal information as a result of this incident, out of an abundance of caution Kroger has arrange to offer credit monitoring to all affected individuals at no cost to them."

NurseryCam

NurseryCam, a service that lets parents view their children through a webcam while at nursery, has suffered a data breach. Informing its users of the incident this week, NurseryCam said it did not believe the incident had resulted in children or staff being watched by anyone without permission, but has switched off its server as a precaution.

The company said attackers had exploited a loophole in its system that allowed them to gather up the usernames, passwords, names and email addresses of parents who had used the service to watch their children remotely, the BBC reports. NurseryCam director Dr Melissa Kao said: "The person who identified the loophole has so far acted responsibly...he stated he has no intention to use this to do any harm".

The UK-based company is based in Guildford, Surrey and provides its services to around 40 nurseries across the country.

Clubhouse:

Clubhouse, the popular social media app that lets users join audio-only group chats, has suffered a data breach (of sorts). While no personal user data has been stolen, a third-party developer discovered a way to stream audio conversations on their website, despite Clubhouse being iPhone-only and invitation-only. This goes against Clubhouse's claims that audio conversations cannot be recorded, and the user has since been permanently banned from the app.

This incident led to Stanford cybersecurity researchers discovering that user ID numbers and chatroom IDs were being transmitted by Clubhouse in plaintext without any encryption. Clubhouse IDs can be connected to user profiles, leading to identities being traced.

Due to these issues, David Thiel, chief technology officer of the Stanford Internet Observatory, warned that users should consider Clubhouse conversations to be "semi-public"

.

Week of February 15, 2021: Kia Motors American

Kia Motors America, based in California, was hit with a heavy ransomware attack to the tune of 404 bitcoin — which at the time attackers claimed was worth about $20 million. (404 of course is a reference to an error message meaning a link is not turning up a requested page on the web.) Today, bitcoin is hovering at about $51,811 which makes that value jump to $20.9 million. And the attackers actually warned that the amount would jump to 600 bitcoin if the payment was not made in a "specific time frame," according o details obtained by Bleeping Computer.

With the payment, hackers promised to release a tool which would unlock the data — and also to not leak data as well. Kia Motors America however told Bleeping Computer they had not seen evidence that they were in fact victims of a ransomware attack.

Law firm Jones Day

A law firm, Jones Day, has suffered a data breach that involves internal communication within the firm, as well as client data, according to Bloomberg Law.

The breach occurred from the file transfer platform, FTA, used by the firm and provided by Accellion. And at least one other law firm has in recent weeks also been affected by the same breach as well. Accellion has admitted that FTA was hit by a cyberattack, and had notified customers on December 23, 2020.

California DMW

Up to 20 months of personal information on drivers in California may have been breached during an attack on the state's DMV. The hack came via a third-party breach, one that hit Automatic Funds Transfer Services, according to SF Gate.

Involved are details one would expect the DMV would have drivers' names, addresses and license plate numbers, but not information such as Social Security numbers.

Week of February 8, 2021: Cryptocurrency theft with SIM-swapping

This week, Europol announced the arrests of eight people for their alleged involvement in a series of SIM-swapping attacks targeting high-profile victims in the US. These follow two earlier arrests of people believed to be of the same criminal network. The group is alleged to have targeted thousands of victims throughout 2020, including famous influencers, sports stars, musicians and their families. Europol claims the group is believed to have stolen over $100 million worth of cryptocurrency from the victims, after gaining illegal access to their phones.

SIM-swapping is described by Europol: "It involves cybercriminals taking over use of a victim's phone number by essentially deactivating their SIM and porting the allocated number over to a SIM belonging to a member of the criminal network. The is typically achieved by the criminals exploiting phone service providers to do the swap on their behalf, either via a corrupt insider or using social engineering techniques."

'Compilation of Many Breaches'

An unprecedented 3.27 billion cleartext username and email addresses were leaked on a popular hacking forum this week, putting a huge proportion of internet users at risk to credential-stuffing attacks on their private accounts. Reported by Cyber News, the incident involved the leaking of databases containing usernames and passwords caught up in many previous leaks and data breaches, including those of Netflix and LinkedIn. The incident is known as the COMB, or the Compilation of any Breaches.

Cyber News explained: "This does not appear to be a new breach, but rather the largest compilation of multiple breaches...The impact to consumers and businesses of this new breach may be unprecedented. Because the majority of people reuse their passwords and usernames across multiple accounts, credential stuffing attacks is the biggest threat."

Credential stuffing is where criminals use databases like this to repeatedly guess at the usernames and passwords of online accounts. Once one has been cracked, they can use that email address and password combination on other services, assuming the victim used the same details more than once. The leak is believed to be twice as large as 2017's Breach Compilation, which included 1.4 billion email addresses and passwords from 252 previous breaches, including Minecraft, Badoo, Bitcoin and Pastebin.

Cyberpunk developer CD Projekt

CD Projekt, the Polish developer of the Cyberpunk 2077 video game, fell victim to a cyberattack this week. Hackers broken into the company's servers and claim to have stolen source code relating to its Cyberpunk 2077, Gwent and Witcher 3 video games. A ransom note left by the hackers and published this morning (February 9) by CD Projekt's Twitter account also claims they have obtained "all of your documents relating to accounting, administration, legal, HR, investor relations and more". The hackers say these documents "will be sent to our contacts in gaming journalism," and that the game developer's servers have been encrypted.

The hackers then appear to have put the stolen code up for auction, with a starting price of $1million and a buy-it-now option for $7million. The hackers later claimed to have received an offer for the data, according to cybersecurity firm Kela.

In a statement released alongside a copy of the ransom note, CD Projekt said it discovered the cyber attack on February 8 and admitted that some of its "internal systems" had been compromised. The statement said: "An unidentified actor gained unauthorized access to our internal network, collected data belonging to CD Projekt capital group, and left a ransom note...Although some devices in our network have been encrypted, our backups remain intact. We have already secured our IT infrastructure and begun restoring the data."

Week of February 1, 2021: USCellular

USCellular admitted to a hack of a program that leaked names, addresses, billing information and others details of existing customers. The breach happened in January 2021, and occurred when retail workers in a store downloaded a rogue program to a computer — which then tunneled into USCellular's system, specifically a customer relationship management program.

The company filed a notice with the Office of the Vermont Attorney General, but also reached out to customers involved, alerting them to the breach and to the fact that their login details had been changed as well as PIN numbers. The affected computer has been take offline, and employee login details have also been changed.

Washington state

People who filed for unemployment in Washington state may have been caught up in a data breach that revealed personal details on 1.6 million claimants from throughout 2020. The breach is being blamed on an outside software service, Accellion, according to GeekWire.

The attack itself occurred on December 25, 2020, and the data affected included people who had filed for unemployment through December 10, as well as some state employees. Details from someone's name to their Social Security number, driver's license, bank information and where they had worked prior to filing was also exposed. People who believe they may have been involved can go to a state web site with more details about the breach, put up by the Office of the Washington State Auditor, for further information.

DriveSure

A car dealership based in Illinois had its database breached, with details on more than 3 million customers involved. The breach, reported by Infosecurity, involved DriveSure, and included information including names, email addresses, phone numbers, the car that is owned, home addresses, car damage and more. It also involved more than 93,000 hashed passwords.

The hack was discovered after the data was uploaded to a dark web forum on December 19, 2020, and included three folders of information including .mil and .gov email addresses.

Week of January 25, 2021: Bonobos

Men's clothing store Bonobos suffered a massive data breach earlier this month, which saw the exposure of millions of customers details in a 70GB database. The trove of data, lifted from Bonobos' website, included customer addresses, phone numbers, the last four digits of credit card numbers, order information and password histories, reports Bleeping Computer.

The data included the addresses and phone numbers of seven million customers or orders, and 3.5 million partial credit card numbers. The retailer, which was bought by Walmart in 2017 for $300 million, says the data was stolen from an online backup rather than from the website itself. The company said: "What we have discovered is an unauthorized third party was able to view a backup file hosted in an external cloud environment. We contacted the host provider to resolve this issue as soon as we became aware of it." Customers of Bonobos are urged to change their passwords immediately, and to change their login details of any other services or accounts they use with the same password.

VIP Games

Online gaming platform VIP Games was found this week to have exposed 23 million data records on a misconfigured server, researchers from WizCase discovered. The data belonged to 66,000 users and included usernames, email addresses, social media IDs, bets, device details, IP addresses and hashed passwords.

VIP Games has in the region of 20,000 daily players and offers online versions of popular classic card and board games like Ludo and Dominoes. Chase Williams from WizCase wrote: "If such data had fallen into the hands of cybercriminals, it could have been exploited for identity theft, fraud, phishing, scamming, espionage and malware infestation. The leak was discovered as part of WizCase' research project that randomly looked for open servers and sought to understand what data these servers contained."

BuyUCoin

Crytocurrency services are a popular target for hackers, and the latest victim is India-based BuyUCoin, which appears to have had an insecure database accessed by hacking group ShinyHunters. The cryptocurrency exchange says it is investigating claims that sensitive data of hundreds of thousands of its users has been published on the dark web, reports Graham Cluley for BitDefender. The 6GB of leaked data appears to have come from a MongoDB database and includes user bank account details, email addresses, hashed passwords, mobile phone numbers and Google sign-in tokens.

Having first described the incident as "a low impact security incident" which only affected 200 entries of non-sensitive dummy data, BuyUCoin later replaced this statement with a message saying it is "investigating each and every aspect of the report about malicious and unlawful cybercrime activities by foreign entities in mid-2020."

Week of January 18, 2021: Capcom

Gamers of the popular titles "Dark Stalkers" and "Resident Evil," should check their credentials — and start changing passwords. The developer of the titles, Capcom, is now expanding the number of accounts that may have been compromised in a ransomware attack from November 2020, reports Threatpost.

Originally thought to be 40,000 customers, the attack now may have affected 400,000 accounts with personal data involved.

Nitro

Nitro, a web-based PDF service, just got hit in one of the worst ways, with its database of more than 77 million records leaked online — for free. The details inside include email addresses, names and passwords and even IP addresses which is the unique number assigned to a device, like your computer, to get online.

While the hack actually happened in 2020, the database is actually now online, placed there after offering the download link for $3, according to BleepingComputer.

Malwarebytes

The security firm Malwarebytes is reporting a hack into its system, gaining access to some internal company emails. The breach gained access through Microsoft Office 365 and Azure, according to Ars Technica, which added that this is the same threat actor that was involved with the attack on SolarWinds in 2019.

Week of January 11, 2021: Parler

Despite being taken offline, and distanced by Apple, Google and Amazon, millions of posts published to the Parler social media app are still visible online. The messages were accessed, 'scraped' from Parler before the service was taken offline on January 11, and uploaded to the Internet Archive. This was done by Twitter user @donk_enby, a so-called hacker and internet activist. She tweeted to say the scraped data included delete and private posts, plus videos that contained "all associated metadata." This data is thought to include the location of where the posts and videos were created.

A such, the data collected by @donk_enby could prove highly valuable, as law enforcement could potentially use the metadata to identify rioters who stormed the Capitol last week. Unusual for Parler is how it doesn't strip out the metadata of uploaded images and videos, as other social networks and web services do.

Ubiquiti

Ubiquiti Networks, a vendor of networking equipment and Internet of Things devices, informed its customers on January 11 to inform them of a recent security breach. The company said: "We recently became aware of unauthorized access to certain of our information technology systems hosted by a third party cloud provider." The targeted servers stored information relating to user profiles for the company's account.ui.com web portal.

While the company says it is "not currently aware of evidence of access to any databases that host user data," it admits it "cannot be certain that user data has not been exposed." This data, Ubiquiti says, may include customer names, email addresses and one-way encrypted passwords – in other words, passwords that are hashed and salted. Customers are urged to change their password, and also the passwords of any websites and services that use the same username and email address as on Ubiquiti. Customers should also enable two-factor authentication.

Pfizer

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced on January 12 that some of the data stolen from the servers of Pfizer and BioNTech, creators of a Covid-19 vaccine, has been leaked online. The EMA said: "The ongoing investigation of the cyberattack on EMA revealed that some of the lawfully accessed documents related to Covid-19 medicines and vaccines belonging to third parties have been leaked on the internet...Necessary action is being taken by the law enforcement authorities."

The agency was keen to point out that European medicines regulation services remain fully functional, and the evaluation and approval timelines of Covid-19 vaccines have not been affected by the data breach, reports BleepingComputer. It is claimed the stolen data, which was unlawfully accessed in December 2020, includes screenshots of emails, EMA peer-reviewed comments, Word documents, PDFs and PowerPoint presentations.

Week of January 4, 2021: British Airways £3 billion settlement

British Airways to starting to talk about settlements regarding 2018 data breaches that exposed details about 185,000 of the airlines rewards members as well as about 380,000 regular users of its app and web site.

Details from names to email addresses, and even credit card as well as the security codes were breached, and the settlement could reach up to £3 billion, according to Infosecurity magazine.

T-Mobile attacked again

T-Mobile has started alerting customers about a data breach that involved their phone numbers, the number of lines on their accounts and even call records. But the company emphasized that details including Social Security numbers, passwords and even physical addresses were not compromised.

The unauthorized access was stopped, said T-Mobile, which is now investigating and has also "reported this matter to federal law enforcement," it said in a statement.

The company reported a similar attack back in March 2020.

Aurora Cannabis employee data breached

Canadian cannabis company Aurora Cannabis has started to reaching out to employees — both current and past — about a breach on December 25, 2020. Involved were details that the company would have had on file about people who worked there including banking data and home addresses, reports MJBizDaily.

People report they first started hearing about it on December 31, which involved a breach into software including SharePoint and OneDrive.

Источник: https://www.gearbrain.com/data-breach-cybersecurity-latest-hacks-2633724298.html

Pittsburgh Area Residents Still Receiving Chase Bank Cards They Did Not Sign Up For

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – More people in the Pittsburgh area have become victims of identity theft involving Chase Bank checking accounts and local police are trying to figure out who is using residents’ personal information to open accounts.

“It was scary, it was so scary,” Rosemary Dubyak said.

READ MORE: COVID-19 In Pennsylvania: State Reports Over 10,000 New Cases

Rosemary Dubyak is still baffled after her husband, Andrew, got a Chase Bank debit card in the mail for an account he didn’t open. She said they weren’t sure what to do until they saw KDKA’s news story on Wednesday about the recent identity fraud.

The Pleasant Hills couple spent hours taking the necessary precautions like freezing his credit, calling Chase Bank and police. Two days later, they received three more Chase debit cards in the mail.

“I was just physically sick when we got three more because then I thought this isn’t over and why did it happen, how did it happen,” Dubyak said.

Police departments all around the Pittsburgh area are getting reports of this fraud.

The Peters Township Police Department has had over 25 cases. They are creating a task force along with the South Hills Area Council of Governments (SHACOG) to investigate and attempt to identify the individuals responsible. They requested assistance from the United States Secret Service.

Watch as KDKA’s Chris Hoffman reports:

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“We’re trying to put a task force together with all the local departments. There are hundreds of identity thefts occurring through Chase Bank. We’re also requesting assistance from the United States Secret Service,” said Corporal Lou Reda with the Peters Township Police Department.

Police said personal information is being used to create accounts because of a recent Chase Bank offer. Chase offers $200 if you open a new checking account and set up direct deposits.

“Right now, we’re not really sure whose been opening these accounts. It’s been hundreds. Somewhere there was a breach of personal information. The credit cards are coming with victims’ names, going to their address,es and actually using a social security number to open the accounts,” said Corporal Reda.

Dubyak said when they called Chase Bank about the three new cards sent to them, they were told the accounts were closed but she still has lots of questions.

“What bothered me is that there are no checks and balances in place to put up a red flag when it occurred,” Dubyak said.

Dubyak hopes someone will find the answers.

“42 years we’ve been married. We’ve shredded everything and been so careful with our information and someone got it. I want them to find who did it and how it happened,” Dubyak said.

If this happens you believe you are a victim of this: contact your local police department, make a report and obtain an incident number then call Chase Bank and demand the account be closed due to fraud.

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Police said you should also contact all three credit bureaus to put a watch on your credit history and report this as identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission.

Источник: https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2021/03/07/chase-bank-card-fraud-continues/

JPMorgan Chase warns customers of possible data exposure

JPMorgan Chase says a technical glitch may have exposed the personal information of some online and mobile banking customers.

In a notification letter posted on the Montana attorney general’s website, the company said "a technology issue" may have mistakenly allowed customers to see other customers’ personal information and account information on its website or in the Chase Mobile app, or receive others’ account statements. The company said it found no indication that customers’ information was used inappropriately.

Customers might have seen other customers’ balances and transactions as well as name and account numbers, the company said.

The problem lasted from May 24 to July 14, according to data breach incident information posted on the Montana attorney general's website. JPMorgan has offered affected customers a year of free credit monitoring from Experian.

A JPMorgan spokesman declined a request for an interview but referred to the notification letter on the AG's website.

“We notified a very limited number of customers, including seven in Montana,” he said.

The letter did not specify how many people were affected in total or whether they were in multiple states.

The company suffered a similar incident for about three hours in February 2018.

Mishaps that allow customers to access other customers' files are typically caused by software configuration errors.

Klarna Bank in Sweden had an episode in late May in which its app users were able to see other users' account information when they logged in. Each time they signed in, they saw a different customer's account data. The bank chalked the issue up to a "mobile app bug."

Источник: https://www.americanbanker.com/news/jpmorgan-chase-warns-customers-of-possible-data-exposure

Chase Wins $20M In Landry's Data Breach Suit

By Lauren Berg (May 10, 2021, 6:24 PM EDT) -- Landry's must repay $20 million in penalties that Visa and Mastercard levied against JPMorgan Chase Bank NA following a breach of the hospitality company's data, a Texas federal judge has ruled, saying Landry's broke its merchant agreement.

U.S. District Judge Lynn N. Hughes on Friday granted a motion for partial summary judgment brought by Chase and its payment processing arm Paymentech LLC, finding that Landry's Inc. is contractually obligated to pay the $20 million that the bank was charged by Visa and Mastercard to cover the costs of a data breach the hospitality company announced in 2015.

Chase and Paymentech claim...

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Источник: https://www.law360.com/articles/1383192/chase-wins-20m-in-landry-s-data-breach-suit

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