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Birds of eastern north carolina


birds of eastern north carolina

All of the bird species recorded in NC, their distribution in the state; their relative abundance in each region; their periods of occurrence in the state;. These birds breed in urban and suburban areas in the eastern half of America The Common Yellowthroat breeds in western North Carolina and prefers wet. Mammals · Fish · Birds · Amphibians-Frogs & Toads · Amphibians - Salamanders · Reptiles-Alligator · Reptiles-Lizards · Reptiles-Snakes.
birds of eastern north carolina
birds of eastern north carolina

Birds of eastern north carolina -

And yet one more creature labeled "Carolinean" was one that we heard during twilight in pinelands, where BACHMAN'S SPARROWS sang and RED-COCKADED WOODPECKERS nested. The sound was lamb-like, a nasal "baaa", that came from the EASTERN NARROWMOUTH TOAD, Gastrophyrne carolinensis.  

But, regarding birds, part of the reason why there's so much Carolinean in names is because there was so much early exploration and bird study that took place in the beginning days of what's now North & South Carolina.
And in the early 1700's, that was prior to the standardization, as we now know it, of common, and particularly scientific, names.

The renowned Swedish taxonomist, Carolus Linnaenus, had much to do with that standardizing, in a global sense. His major accomplishment, the publication of his "Systema Naturae" was in 1758. In it, for example, a common bird of the Carolinas, the MOCKINGBIRD, was described. Others were later. For example, it was in 1766 that Linnaenus described the CATBIRD as Dumetella carolinensis.

Much about the early Carolinean avifauna was included in the work published in 1731 by Mark Catesby, entitled the "A Natural History of the Carolinas, Florida, & the Bahamas". Volumes sold in England at 2 guineas each.

Catesby referred to the work by two men who, when in North Carolina, contributed much to early American ornithology, John White and John Lawson.

John White was the first to draw American birds extensively (he drew 32 species). His work was in a book by John Lawson entitled "A New Voyage to Carolina", published in 1709.
White actually made 4 voyages to the New World. On the second, in 1587, he went as the governor of 150 settlers at Sir Walter Raleigh's colony on Roanoke Island, North Carolina.
(We stay one overnight on that island during our North Carolina tours.)

When John White was on Roanoke Island, his daughter and her husband, were parents to the first English child born in America, Virginia Dare. Thereafter, John White had to leave Roanoke Island to go to England. When he returned to Roanoke Island in 1590, he found little trace of the colony and none of the colonists who stayed when he left.
A listing of the 32 bird species drawn by John White follows this narrative. 

John Lawson, the author of the book "A New Voyage to Carolina" in 1709, was, prior to that, a co-founder of North Carolina's oldest town, a place named Bath. His book was the first major attempt at a natural history in the New World. It became popular in Europe because of its vivid descriptions of the North American Indians and their customs, but in it also were good descriptions of newly-found birds and animals. Over 100 species of birds were noted in the book, and a listing of them (with names given by Lawson) follows this narrative.  

In 1711, Lawson was in a party exploring, in North Carolina, the Neuse River, determining how far inland it was navigable. During that venture, he was killed by Indians.
(During our NC tours, some of our best birding is in the upper Neuse River Valley, particularly at a wonderful reserve called Howell Woods.)

The feeders at Howell are a wonderful place to nicely see some attractive birds indeed. Those feeders there are somehow without Grackles, Starlings, and the like. 
Rather, there are (and were for us during our most-recent tour ) RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS (& 2 other woodpecker species), EASTERN BLUEBIRDS (called BLEW BIRDS in the days of White, Lawson, and Catesby), along with BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH (and the WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, remember,Sitta carolinensis).  
Bright and colorful AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES and CARDINALS were there in numbers, as a male SUMMER TANAGER was not far away (called the "SUMMER RED-BIRD" by Catesby).  
Added to the avian mix were CHIPPING SPARROWS and BROWN THRASHER. 
A NORTHERN BOBWHITE walked through the feeder area. 
Nearby, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS were nesting in a tree-hole. 
Maybe a dozen RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS were coming to the feeders, with the brilliant gorget of the male, up close, just dazzling.
It was a nice place to sit in the shade and simply enjoy the birds.

The assortment of habitats throughout the Howell property contains a large number of birds to be enjoyed. At the edges of the woods, there were both BLUE GROSBEAKS and INDIGO BUNTINGS. In the woods, there are numerous WARBLERS (about a dozen species breed) including PROTHONOTARY, HOODED, KENTUCKY, and SWAINSON'S.

But it was a bird most apt to be seen in the sky that we seek and usually see at the Howell property, the MISSISSIPPI KITE. It's a raptor that when it's aerial it can be acrobatic catching insects, particularly dragonflies. This area of the upper Neuse valley has been good for us for the MISSISSIPPI KITE over the years.

(In 2004, by the way, north of North Carolina, MISSISSIPPI KITES caused enjoyment for a number of birders in places such as Maryland and New Jersey. Probably due to the 17-year CICADA.)

During our tour in North Carolina that year, in '04, we did not encountered any 17-year CICADAS (when they were locally common to the north). But we did see at Howell, in addition to the KITES (which nest there), a large number of various DRAGONFLIES (see the list that follows this narrative).

An aside for a moment regarding the name MISSISSIPPI KITE it's really not as common in Mississippi as it is other places. It's most common, during the North American summer, in the Central US, in Oklahoma for example. During the Southern American summer, that's where it is.
Some other birds with common names relating to a place where the bird is not as common as it is elsewhere include the CONNECTICUT WARBLER and PHILADELPHIA VIREO.

Some of the "nice birds" that we've seen, over the years, during our North Carolina tours, seem to be getting less common.

That's the case with one of our best birds, the RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER. According to Birdlife International, this bird of the pines (LONGLEAF, SHORTLEAF, SLASH, and LOBLOLLY), declined overall during the decade 1980-90 by about 25 per cent. It is now limited to about 30 isolated populations, with the most in South Carolina and Florida. About 50 percent are now in just 6 of those populations.

North Carolina is now the north edge of the RED-COCKADED'S range. We saw the species in an area where it has traditionally nested, in the Croatan Forest. But it was only one pair, that we encountered during our most recent tour - but at an active nest.
RED-COCKADED WOODPECKERS have nested as far north as Maryland in the 1960's (not many, a few were discovered there only in the 1930's). In the 1970's, RED-COCKADED nested in Virginia. Now, no longer, as they are not north of southern North Carolina.

Another bird, that we've enjoyed during our NC Tours, with a range that's been receding south, is the WILSON'S PLOVER.
The first specimen of the species was, in 1813, collected by Alexander Wilson, in southern New Jersey (at present-day Cape May). The WILSON'S PLOVER, until not that long ago, nested north of North Carolina, along the beaches of the Delmarva Peninsula and New Jersey. It's occurrence now is as a rarity.

During North Carolina tours, a particularly enjoyable venture has been an afternoon boat-ride to an offshore barrier island, where no one lives, and where there are no roads. So, there are no houses and no cars. Only a pristine beach and dunes, by eastern US or Carolina standards, rather unaffected by people. We've walked the beach to the sandy area adjacent to one of the inlets where we've seen well as many as 8 WILSON'S PLOVERS.

One thinks, sometimes, about birds that appear to be (or actually are) declining.
The RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER and WILSON'S PLOVER have just been mentioned.
At another spot along the Carolina coast, we've seen the RED KNOT, a long-distance migrant in the Americas that's had a depreciable decline in recent years.
WHIP-POOR-WILLS and NIGHTHAWKS seem, on the basis of our previous experience, to be declining.
While RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS have been seen at a few places during our North Carolina tours (particularly where we were looking for the RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER), that species has declined (and even disappeared) from many places where it was  in the northeastern US.

Conversely, it comes to mind, that from a beach where we've watched SANDWICH and other TERNS feeding in the water, that the BROWN PELICAN is in greater numbers than it has been in the past. A few decades ago, the species was in trouble. No longer so, as its numbers have increased, and it's expanded north - that bird of the mid-Atlantic coast known as Pelecanus occidentalis carolinensis.

A Carolina bird-specialty of the pinewoods, formerly known as the "PINEWOODS SPARROW" seemed to continue in relatively stable numbers. That bird, most often known as the BACHMAN'S SPARROW, is named after a Carolinean (a South Carolinean) of the early 1800's.

The "Carolinean bird" with which we had the most contact during our evening and after-dark excursions was the CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW, Caprimulgus carolinensis. But our best encounter in the dark was when, as we were going along a remote dirt road, we heard in a roadside tree, a young owl. We stopped the vehicle, and within moments, there was an adult BARRED OWL, that also came on the scene. It was looking directly at us, with its big brown eyes, just a few feet away, in the shine of our headlights.

But a bird that we enjoyed as much as (if not more than) any other during the tour was one that would come out to sing up in a tree and atop a bush late in the afternoon, the PAINTED BUNTING. It reaches the northern limit of its breeding range along the southern North Carolina coast. What a nice bird, the adult male is to see, with bright blue, green, and red.
It was a target to be seen for all of us, and we loved it!

Reading about the PAINTED BUNTING in the historical book noted earlier, written by Mark Catesby in 1731, we learn that to the south, the Spanish colonists called the bird the "MARIPOSA PINTADA", the "PAINTED BUTTERFLY".
In that book, we also read that back in those days, it was commonly kept as a popular caged bird. A governor of South Carolina at that time kept 4 or 5 of the colorful songsters in cages.
In New Orleans, among the French inhabitants, the bird was also very popular as a cage-bird. During a visit there, Alexander Wilson wrote of it as being the most common of the birds kept in homes. A name given to it was 'NONPAREIL". Of course, the brilliant adult males were favored. It became known that it took over a year for the males to attain their colorful plumage.
During our tour, we saw a few males, some still dull, others bright.
It's nice to know that nowadays, the only way people enjoy the sight and sound of the PAINTED BUNTING is as we did, in the wild. (Native birds in the US can no longer be kept as caged birds.)

Referring to birds in the US, here's a trivia question of sorts:
Other than some very localized, sometimes recently "split" species (such as 2 of the Scrub-Jays, the Gunnison Sage-Grouse, Juniper Titmouse, the re-introduced California Condor, and the Yellow-billed Magpie, actually endemic to California):
What species are endemic to only the Lower 48 States?

There are not many: RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER, FISH CROW, CAROLINA CHICKADEE, BACHMAN'S SPARROW, BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE.

We saw all of these during our North Carolina tour. (This comes to mind as one year, one of our tour participants was a Canadian, and for him 3 of these species were "lifers" .)

And if you think that one might have been forgotten, the BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH also resides in the Bahamas.

Some of the best mammal experiences that we've had during our North Carolina tours have been sightings of Black Bears, the Red Wolf, Bobcat, and one time when we came upon a group of 8 River Otters, frolicking together in a pond.

Above, at the beginning of this narrative, there are listings of birds, as well as the other wildlife, that have been found cumulatively during the FONT North Carolina Tours since 1992. 
Among those birds is another that lastly should be mentioned here, the Wood Duck, that has also been known over the years by another name, the "Carolina Duck".



Источник: http://focusonnature.com/NorthCarolinaBirdEssay.htm

Hummingbirds found in North Carolina, USA


Hummingbirds found in the USA (by U.S. State) ... Canada ... Mexico ... Puerto Rico ... Jamaica ... Honduras


Hummingbird Information ... Extreme Metabolism and Survival and Flight Adaptions - Amazing Facts about Hummingbirds

The following hummingbird species are known to occur in North Carolina (with photos and ID assistance):


Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) - Native Breeders - Common during the summer, rare in the winter. They usually arrive in March for the breeding season and leave in September or October to return to their wintering territories Males usually depart first, and females and the young follow about two weeks later.

The male has a ruby-red throat, a white collar, an emerald green back and a forked tail.

The female has a green back and tail feathers that are banded white, black and grey-green.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubrisRuby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)


Rufous Hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus) - The most commonly observed wintering hummingbird in Georgia, other than the Ruby-throated Hummingbird in the southeastern United States.

These hummingbirds are usually found in gardens and at feeders. These birds are fearless, and are known for chasing away other hummingbirds and even larger birds, or rodents away from their favorite nectar feeders and flowers.

Males can easily be identified by their glossy orange-red throats.

Females have whitish, speckled throats, green backs and crowns, and rufous, white-tipped tail feathers.

Rufous HummingbirdRufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus)


Rufous Hummingbird versus the similar Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Identification)


Black-chinned Hummingbirds (Archilochus alexandri) - Rare vagrants

The male has a black, shimmering throat with a purple edge and pale feathers below that create a collar. However, unless the light is just right, the head looks all black. His back is green and there are some green feathers covering the chest.

The female is pale below (sometimes with a slightly speckled throat) and her back is green.

Black-chinned HummingbirdBlack-chinned Hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri)


Buff-bellied Hummingbird, Amazilia yucatanensisBuff-bellied Hummingbirds (Amazilia yucatanensis) - Accidental / Vagrants - Occur in fall, winter and spring

The male's throat is a metallic golden green and the red, dark-tipped bill is straight and slender. Back and head are mostly metallic olive. The lower chest ranges in coloration to whitish with various shades of grey or green, or buffy (yellowish-brown).

The tail and primary wing feathers are rufous (reddish-brown) and slightly forked. The underwing is white.

The female is generally less colorful than the male and has a a dark upper bill


Broad-billed Hummingbirds (Cynanthus latirostris) - Accidental / Vagrants - These mostly Mexican hummingbirds venture into the United States regularly; they mostly visit the southern parts - but a few vagrants travel as far north as Wisconsin.

The male is glossy green above and on the chest. He has a deep blue throat. His straight and slender beak is red with a black tip. His slightly forked tail is dark above, and the under tail feathers are white.

The female is less colorful than the male. Her throat, chest and belly are light to medium grey. She has a white stripe over each eye.

Broad-billed Hummingbird maleBroad-billed Hummingbird, Cynanthus latirostris,


Anna's Hummingbirds (Calypte anna) - Rare vagrants.

One of the larger and the most vocal hummingbirds in the United States, where it is the only species to produce a song; specifically the males produce a complex series of scratchy noises, sounding like a sharp "chee-chee-chee; when moving from flower to flower, they emit toneless "chip" vocalizations. All other hummingbirds in the United States are mostly silent.

They are well known for their territorial behavior; the male makes elaborate dive displays at other birds and sometimes even at people. At the bottom of their dives, they produce high-pitched loud popping sounds with their tail feathers.

Males have glossy dark rose-red throats and crowns, which may appear black or dark purple in low light. The underside is mostly greyish; and the back metallic green.

Females have light grey chests with white and red spotting on the throat, greenish back and white tipped tails.

They resemble the Costa's Hummingbirds, but the male's Costa's Hummingbird's gorget (throat feathers) is longer than that of the Anna's. They are larger than the Rufous Hummingbirds and lack the rusty coloration of the Rufous Hummingbirds.

Anna's HummingbirdAnna’s Hummingbird, Calypte anna


Broad-tailed Hummingbirds (Selasphorus platycercus) - Rare vagrants

Males can most easily be identified by their iridescent, rose-red throats, white chest feathers and metallic green back and crown and their rounded tails. The males' tails make whistling noises in flight.

Females lack the flashy throat patch of the male and are mostly pale below. Their white-tipped outer tail feathers are rust-colored close to the body and blackish in the center; the tail feathers in the center range from green to blackish.

Broad-tailed Hummingbird MaleBroad-tailed Hummingbird


Allen's Hummingbirds (Selasphorus sasin) - Rare vagrants - Easily confused with the Rufous Hummingbird, but the Allen's can be identified by the green back whereas the Rufous Hummingbird has a coppery back.

The male has a throat that ranges in color from orange-red to yellow-orange, a back that is bright green, a rump that is rufous and its tail feathers are rufous tipped in black.

Allen's Hummingbird (Selasphorus sasin) Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus)


Green Violet-ear HummingbirdGreen Violetear Hummingbirds (Colibri thalassinus) - Rare / Accidental - They are mostly resident in Mexico and Central America, but some seasonal movements have been observed. They may wander north to the United States and even as far north as Canada..

The plumage is mostly grass green turning into a bronze on the rump and uppertail feathers. There is a broad violet central spot on the upper breast. The violet-blue band along the chin often connects to the violet-blue "ear." The tail is square and slightly notched with a broad dark blue band at the end of it.

The smaller females have a slightly duller plumage.


Calliope Hummingbirds (Stellula calliope formerly Archilochus calliope) - Rare vagrants.

The smallest breeding bird in North America. They are most easily confused with the Rufous Hummingbirds and the Broad-tailed Hummingbird.

Calliope HummingbirdFemale Calliope Hummingbird


Green-breasted Mango FemaleGreen-breasted Mangos (Anthracothorax prevostii) - Increasingly frequent vagrants and extremely rare residents in Texas and accidental vagrants to other U.S. states - These hummingbirds are native to Mexico, Central America down to Costa Rica, and some Caribbean islands. However, juveniles especially have been venturing into the United States. A juvenile male was reported in Concord, North Carolina in November 2000.

Adult Males: The plumage is mostly glossy bright green, more yellowish brown on its flanks (sides) and vent. There is a broad blue area from its throat to below the chest - which may appear black in poor light conditions. The outer tail feathers range in color from an orangey-red to magenta or a deep purple tipped with black.

Females and Juvenile Males: The outer tail feathers have broad magenta and glossy dark blue bands and the 3 - 4 outer tail feathers are white tipped. The plumage above is bronze-green. Below they are white with a dark middle stripe that changes from black at the chin to blue-green on the throat.

Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii)Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii)


WHITE Hummingbird Sightings (Leucistic / Albino)


Is it a Hummingbird or an Insect?

The Hawk Moths (often referred to as "Hummingbird Moth") is easily confused with hummingbirds, as they have similar feeding and swift flight patterns. These moths also hover in midair while they feed on nectar. Moths have a couple of sensors or "antennas" on top of the head, which are key identifiers.

(Note: Hawk-moAmerican Hawk or Hummingbird Mothth photo refers to a European species, which is out of the range of the American hummingbirds - but the American hawk-moth looks quite similar.)


Species Research by Sibylle Johnson


Attract Hummingbirds to YOUR Garden!!


Please Note: The articles or images on this page are the sole property of the authors or photographers. Please contact them directly with respect to any copyright or licensing questions. Thank you.

Источник: https://www.beautyofbirds.com/hummingbirdsnorthcarolina.html

Eastern bluebirds in Charlotte, North Carolina

© Elizabeth W. Kearley/Getty Image

Four little birds sitting in a tree…

This chunky foursome caught in a North Carolina snowstorm is a group of eastern bluebirds, the most widespread of the three types of bluebird. (The other two are the western and mountain.) The eastern bluebird range covers a wide area—east of the Rocky Mountains from southern Canada down to Central America, then over to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. You can spot them in grasslands, forest clearings, meadows, and the like.

All bluebirds are cavity nesters, which means they make their homes in the hollows of trees, in holes vacated by bigger birds like woodpeckers, and in artificial nests called nest boxes. Nest boxes played a big role in helping the eastern bluebird population rebound after a precipitous decline in the early 20th century due to habitat loss and the introduction of nonnative species that out-competed them for nesting holes. Enter conservation groups and passionate backyard birders. They put up nest boxes specifically designed for bluebirds that provided needed shelter for these colorful thrushes.

This conservation success story makes the eastern bluebird the perfect mascot for the Great Backyard Bird Count, an online citizen science project sponsored by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society that helps monitor wild bird populations. Want to participate? Just count the birds you see in your area and share the results online between February 12-15, 2021. Happy birding!

birdoutdoorsnowanimaloscinecolorful

Источник: https://peapix.com/bing/33952

North Carolina's Must-See Bird Migrations

International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) is celebrated on the second Saturday in May every year. Coordinated by Environment for the Americas, it celebrates and brings attention to one of the most important and spectacular events in the Americas - bird migration. IMBD is celebrated in Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean at protected areas, refuges, parks, museums, schools, zoos, and more. More than 600 events and programs are hosted annually to introduce the public to migratory birds and ways to conserve them. 

Every year, thousands of birds migrate through North Carolina putting on awe-inspiring displays and sparking the excitement of birders and nature enthusiasts across the state. North Carolina is a must-visit destination state when it comes to feathered fauna, with over 460 species being documented to-date with over half that number found breeding here. Here is our list of some must-see bird migrations across the state!

1. Tundra Swans

Tundra Swan

You can't help but notice the Tundra Swan with its white plumage and long, slender neck. Known for its exquisite features and courting rituals, which have made it revered throughout history by people like the Navajo, Ancient Greeks and even Meriwether Lewis, who called them “whistling swans” because of their unique calls. Tundra Swans breed in the Arctic Coastal Plain in Canada then migrate during the winter to the West and East coasts of the United States, where they live in wetlands and salt marshes. During their migration, the swans and other birds seek refuge in... refuges!  Arriving waterfowl find ideal conditions to overwinter on 10 national wildlife refuges throughout North Carolina’s northern coastal plain and barrier islands. According to Bird Watcher's Digest, bird watchers can easily find more than 20 species of ducks as well as thousands of tundra swans and snow geese during a typical moderate winter. 

Where can you spot this magical migration?

2. Fall Coastal Migration

Northern Gannet

Many birders get excited about North Carolina’s coastal birds. Whether it is a pelagic trip out to experience seabirds or to view waterfowl and waterbirds during the colder months, there is much to see. The Outer Banks of North Carolina may be best known for sand dunes and waves, but they are also the site of an incredible fall bird migration. According to the Nature Conservancy, during September and October, prevailing northwest winds and generally clear weather bring a number of songbirds to the region. If the weather is right you can see more than 100 different species of birds! Many of these hangout on the Outer Banks gorging on insects in preparation for a long flight to wintering grounds in the Caribbean and northern South America.

What will you see? Warblers, grosbeaks, tanagers, orioles, vireos 

3. Springtime Mountain Songbird Migration

Canada Warbler

Many songbirds fly to the North Carolina mountains during April and May enroute to their breeding territories in the northern United States and Canada.  It is possible to see as many as 25 species of wood warblers on a single day during the peak of spring migration along with many other species such as vireos, thrushes, flycatchers, and others. The heavily forested mountains provide a key resting and feeding refuge for these migrants. 

What will you see? scarlet tanager, vireos, thrushes, flycatchers, cerulean warblers 

4. Fall Hawk Watch

Red-tailed Hawk

The western part of North Carolina is a popular viewing area for hawk migrations due to the rocky outcroppings and mountain ridgelines that provide optimal wind currents for the hawks to ride as they head south for the winter. Hundreds or even thousands of raptors will soar over Grandfather Mountain in September as the birds of prey make their annual southward migrations. Throughout the month, visitors can join trained staff and volunteers at Linville Peak as Grandfather Mountain participates in the official Hawk Watch through the Hawk Migration Association of North America. 

What will you see? Bald eagles, golden eagles, peregrine falcons, red-tailed hawks, American kestrels, merlins and vultures. 

Learn more about birding in North Carolina:

Источник: https://www.ncdcr.gov/blog/2017/05/11/north-carolinas-must-see-bird-migrations

Species of Local Concern

Chatham, Durham, and Orange Counties are home to several bird species that are of local or regional concern. They include the following:

Bald Eagle

The Bald Eagle is perhaps the most iconic bird in all of North America. Once in steep decline due to DDT, Bald Eagles have made a dramatic recovery in recent years. Within a couple of decades, the Bald Eagle has gone from regional rarity to a fairly common species locally. Healthy populations exist at Jordan and Falls Lakes, and eagle pairs frequently nest near local rivers and reservoirs. New Hope Audubon monitors Bald Eagles at Jordan Lake with eagle counts four times a year. To participate in an upcoming eagle count, contact us for more information.

Barn Owl

Barn Owls have a wide distribution throughout their range, but have been in precipitous decline locally for years. Changes in farm practice, the regeneration of local forest, the use of rodenticides, and development, have all played a role. Barn Owls live in vast, open areas, such as marsh or farmland, where they can avoid their main predator, the Great Horned Owl. See the Piedmont Barn Owl Initiative for more details.

Brown-headed Nuthatch

A denizen of pine forests and mixed woodlands, the Brown-headed Nuthatch breeds locally and lives in our area year round. Although abundant in some places, especially at Jordan Lake, the bird is threatened across much of its range. New Hope Audubon sells Brown-headed Nuthatch boxes online and at our monthly meetings. Placing nest boxes in areas with ample numbers of pine trees may help the local population of this Southern specialty.

Chimney Swift

Chimney Swifts are spring and summer residents that migrate from South America to breed. These fast moving birds once nested in massive, hollow trees in the eastern United States, but have since adapted to using chimneys. If you have nesting swifts in your chimney, simply close the flue damper, and consider yourself lucky. Chimney Swifts are declining over their range, partly due to the recent trend towards capping chimneys. New Hope Audubon has built several swift “towers” in the Triangle, to aid with nesting and roosting. One such tower can be observed at Sandy Creek Park in Durham. For information on swifts in fall migration and their spectacular swirling flocks as they gather for roosting in local chimneys, click here.

Eastern Bluebird

As recently as the 1970’s, the Eastern Bluebird was in steep decline over much of the eastern United States. The effects of DDT, and the lack of old tree cavities for nesting, were partly to blame. After several decades of awareness and conservation, and the installation by landowners of manmade nest boxes, the Eastern Bluebird has made a comeback. New Hope Audubon sells Eastern Bluebird houses online, and at our monthly meetings. Hosting a family of bluebirds is one of the easiest ways to contribute to local conservation efforts. For more information on Bluebird conservation, visit ncbluebird.org

Eastern Meadowlark

The Eastern Meadowlark was once abundant over much of North Carolina’s farm country. Seen perched on wires or fences, these colorful members of the blackbird family nest in fields with long grasses. Changes in farming practice, particularly the early harvest of grasses for hay, have decimated local populations. Farmers and landowners can support Meadowlark conservation by waiting until the birds finish nesting before mowing for hay. New Hope Audubon recommends August 1 for hay harvest, to reduce Meadowlark chick mortality. Low intensity grazing by livestock during the nesting season may also be helpful.

Eastern Screech-owl

The Eastern Screech-owl is a small, adorable looking owl that comes in two varieties: gray and reddish-brown. Cryptic and generally shy, the Screech-owl is more often heard than seen. Its call sounds much like the whinny of a horse, often followed by a melodious trill. Eastern Screech-owls are possibly threatened by the lack of appropriate nest holes in trees, and can be assisted by the proper placement nest boxes. New Hope Audubon sells Screech-owl boxes online, and at our monthly meetings. Placing nest boxes in almost any wooded area, including relatively urban back yards, may help support local Screech-owl populations.

Field Sparrow

As with many open field nesters, like the Bluebird, Meadowlark, and Bobwhite, the Field Sparrow is under pressure locally. This colorful sparrow was once abundant in the Triangle, but has declined due to the loss of farmland to development, and changes in farming practice. Following the land management suggestions for Eastern Meadowlark will also significantly help the Field Sparrow population.

Northern Bobwhite

The Northern Bobwhite, colloquially referred to as “quail,” is an iconic species of the American South. Once an abundant species across its range, the Bobwhite is now in steep decline due to fire suppression and the gradual transition of farmland back to forest. Mowing for hay during the nesting season is also taking its toll on the Bobwhite. Farmers and landowners can support Bobwhite quail by leaving brushy margins and early successional patches on their property. Proper management of pine forest, including the use of controlled burns, is optimal. For more information on Bobwhite Conservation, visit bringbackbobwhites.org

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warblers are cavity nesters that breed in our area in spring. Locally abundant along rivers and lakes, the bird is in decline regionally due to destruction of bottomland forest. Colloquially called the “Golden Swamp Warbler,” this canary-yellow bird adds color and character to our southern lowlands.

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpeckers are residents of bottomland forest, especially where there may be dead trees. Unfortunately, development is encroaching on these types of forests locally. Although these birds are not threatened across their range, they are thought to be declining locally, as these woodpeckers are sensitive to disturbance. Leaving dead trees and snags in lowland areas, and being generally respectful of the birds, can help.

Wood Thrush

The Wood Thrush is considered the most beautiful songster in the eastern United States. The flute like song of the Wood Thrush, however, is slowly fading away, as this shy bird declines across its range. About the size of an American Robin, the Wood Thrush seeks dense, undisturbed forest to make its nest, typically close to the ground. Development is the biggest threat to this species. Maintaining areas of healthy deciduous forest is crucial to the future of the Wood Thrush.

Источник: https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/conservation/species-of-local-concern/
birds of eastern north carolina

North Carolina's Must-See Bird Migrations

International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) is celebrated on the second Saturday in May every year. Coordinated by Environment for the Americas, it celebrates and brings attention to one of the most important and spectacular events in the Americas - bird migration. IMBD is celebrated in Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean at protected areas, refuges, parks, museums, schools, zoos, and more. More than 600 events and programs are hosted annually to introduce the public to migratory birds and ways to conserve them. 

Every year, thousands of birds migrate through North Carolina putting on awe-inspiring displays and sparking the excitement of birders and nature enthusiasts across the state. North Carolina is a must-visit destination state when it comes to feathered fauna, with over 460 species being documented to-date with over half that number found breeding here. Here is our list of some must-see bird migrations across the state!

1. Tundra Swans

Tundra Swan

You can't help but notice the Tundra Swan with its white plumage and long, slender neck. Known for its exquisite features and courting rituals, which have made it revered throughout history by people like the Navajo, Ancient Greeks and even Meriwether Lewis, who called them “whistling swans” because of their unique calls. Tundra Swans breed in the Arctic Coastal Plain in Canada then migrate during the winter to the West and East coasts of the United States, where they live in wetlands and salt marshes. During their migration, the swans and other birds seek refuge in. refuges!  Arriving waterfowl find ideal conditions to overwinter on 10 national wildlife refuges throughout North Carolina’s northern coastal plain and barrier islands. According to Bird Watcher's Digest, bird watchers can easily find more than 20 species of ducks as well as thousands of tundra swans and snow geese during a typical moderate winter. 

Where can you spot this magical migration?

2. Fall Coastal Migration

Northern Gannet

Many birders get excited about North Carolina’s coastal birds. Whether it is a pelagic trip out to experience seabirds or to view waterfowl and waterbirds during the colder months, there is much to see. The Outer Banks of North Carolina may be best known for sand dunes and waves, but they are also the site of an incredible fall bird migration. According to the Nature Conservancy, during September and October, prevailing northwest winds and generally clear weather bring a number of songbirds to the region. If the weather is right you can see more than 100 different species of birds! Many of these hangout on the Outer Banks gorging on insects in preparation for a long flight to wintering grounds in the Caribbean and northern South America.

What will you see? Warblers, grosbeaks, tanagers, orioles, vireos 

3. Springtime Mountain Songbird Migration

Canada Warbler

Many songbirds fly to the North Carolina mountains during April and May enroute to their breeding territories in the northern United States and Canada.  It is possible to see as many as 25 species of wood warblers on a single day during the peak of spring migration along with many other species such as vireos, thrushes, flycatchers, and others. The heavily forested mountains provide a key resting and feeding refuge for these migrants. 

What will you see? scarlet tanager, vireos, thrushes, flycatchers, cerulean warblers 

4. Fall Hawk Watch

Red-tailed Hawk

The western part of North Carolina is a popular viewing area for hawk migrations due to the rocky outcroppings and mountain ridgelines that provide optimal wind currents for the hawks to ride as they head south for the winter. Hundreds or even thousands of raptors will soar over Grandfather Mountain in September as the birds of prey make their annual southward migrations. Throughout the month, visitors can join trained staff and volunteers at Linville Peak as Grandfather Mountain participates in the official Hawk Watch through the Hawk Migration Association of North America. 

What will you see? Bald eagles, golden eagles, peregrine falcons, red-tailed hawks, American kestrels, merlins and vultures. 

Learn more about birding in North Carolina:

Источник: https://www.ncdcr.gov/blog/2017/05/11/north-carolinas-must-see-bird-migrations

Species of Local Concern

Chatham, Durham, and Orange Counties are home to several bird species that are of local or regional concern. They include the following:

Bald Eagle

The Bald Eagle is perhaps the most iconic bird in all of North America. Once in steep decline due to DDT, Bald Eagles have made a dramatic recovery in recent years. Within a couple of decades, the Bald Eagle has gone from regional rarity to a fairly common species locally. Healthy populations exist at Jordan and Falls Lakes, and eagle pairs frequently nest near local rivers and reservoirs. New Hope Audubon monitors Bald Eagles at Jordan Lake with eagle counts four times a year. To participate in an upcoming eagle count, contact us for more information.

Barn Owl

Barn Owls have a wide distribution throughout their range, but have been in precipitous decline locally for years. Changes in farm practice, the regeneration of local forest, the use of rodenticides, and development, have all played a role. Barn Owls live in vast, open areas, such as marsh or farmland, where they can avoid their main predator, the Great Horned Owl. See the Piedmont Barn Owl Initiative for more details.

Brown-headed Nuthatch

A denizen of pine forests and mixed woodlands, the Brown-headed Nuthatch breeds locally and lives in our area year round. Although abundant in some places, especially at Jordan Lake, the bird is threatened across much of its range. New Hope Audubon sells Brown-headed Nuthatch boxes online and at our monthly meetings. Placing nest boxes in areas with ample numbers of pine trees may help the local population of this Southern specialty.

Chimney Swift

Chimney Swifts are spring and summer residents that migrate from South America to breed. These fast moving birds once nested in massive, hollow trees in the eastern United States, but have since adapted to using chimneys. If you have nesting swifts in your chimney, simply close the flue damper, and consider yourself lucky. Chimney Swifts are declining over their range, partly due to the recent trend towards capping chimneys. New Hope Audubon has built several swift “towers” in the Triangle, to aid with nesting and roosting. One such tower can be observed at Sandy Creek Park in Durham. For information on swifts in fall migration and their spectacular swirling flocks as they gather for roosting in local chimneys, click here.

Eastern Bluebird

As recently as the 1970’s, the Eastern Bluebird was in steep decline over much of the eastern United States. The effects of DDT, and the lack of old tree cavities for nesting, were partly to blame. After several decades of awareness and conservation, and the installation by landowners of manmade nest boxes, the Eastern Bluebird has made a comeback. New Hope Audubon sells Eastern Bluebird houses online, and at our monthly meetings. Hosting a family of bluebirds is one of the easiest ways to contribute to local conservation efforts. For more information on Bluebird conservation, visit ncbluebird.org

Eastern Meadowlark

The Eastern Meadowlark was once abundant over much of North Carolina’s farm country. Seen perched on wires or fences, these colorful members of the blackbird family nest in fields with long grasses. Changes in farming practice, particularly the early harvest of grasses for hay, have decimated local populations. Farmers and landowners can support Meadowlark conservation by waiting until the birds finish nesting before mowing for hay. New Hope Audubon recommends August 1 for hay harvest, to reduce Meadowlark chick mortality. Low intensity grazing by livestock during the nesting season may also be helpful.

Eastern Screech-owl

The Eastern Screech-owl is a small, adorable looking owl that comes in two varieties: gray and reddish-brown. Cryptic and generally shy, the Screech-owl is more often heard than seen. Its call sounds much like the whinny of a horse, often followed by a melodious trill. Eastern Screech-owls are possibly threatened by the lack of appropriate nest holes in trees, and can be assisted by the proper placement nest boxes. New Hope Audubon sells Screech-owl boxes online, and at our monthly meetings. Placing nest boxes in almost any wooded area, including relatively urban back yards, may help support local Screech-owl populations.

Field Sparrow

As with many open field nesters, like the Bluebird, Meadowlark, and Bobwhite, the Food clothing shelter basic needs Sparrow is under pressure locally. This colorful sparrow was once abundant in the Triangle, but has declined due to the loss of farmland to development, and changes in farming practice. Following the land management suggestions for Eastern Meadowlark will also significantly help the Field Sparrow population.

Northern Bobwhite

The Northern Bobwhite, colloquially referred to as “quail,” is an iconic species of the American South. Once an abundant species across its range, the Bobwhite is now in steep decline due to fire suppression and the gradual transition of farmland back to forest. Mowing for hay during the nesting season is also taking its toll on the Bobwhite. Farmers and landowners can support Bobwhite quail by leaving brushy margins and early successional patches on their property. Proper management of pine forest, including the use of controlled burns, is optimal. For more information on Bobwhite Conservation, visit bringbackbobwhites.org

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warblers are cavity nesters that breed in our area in spring. Locally abundant along rivers and lakes, the bird is in decline regionally due to destruction of bottomland forest. Colloquially called the “Golden Swamp Warbler,” this canary-yellow bird adds color and character to our southern lowlands.

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpeckers are residents of bottomland forest, especially where there may be dead trees. Unfortunately, development is encroaching on these types of forests locally. Although these birds are not threatened across their range, they are thought to be declining locally, as these woodpeckers are sensitive to disturbance. Leaving dead trees and snags in lowland areas, and being generally respectful of the birds, can help.

Wood Thrush

The Wood Thrush is considered the most beautiful songster in the eastern United States. The flute like song of the Wood Thrush, however, is slowly fading away, as this shy bird declines across its range. About the size of an American Robin, the Wood Thrush seeks dense, undisturbed forest to make its nest, typically close to the ground. Development is food deserts in nyc biggest threat to this species. Outer banks new homes for sale areas of healthy deciduous forest is crucial to the future of the Wood Thrush.

Источник: https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/conservation/species-of-local-concern/

North Carolina, with its spectacular landscape from its coastal plains to its mountainous regions, is home to a number of bird species. It is home to more than 482 different species of birds. Birds in North Carolina range from more frequently seen birds such as the Northern Cardinal to less seen birds such as the Baltimore Oriole. The state bird of North Carolina is the Northern cardinal which sears citi card customer service number declared the state bird in 1943. The Northern cardinal can be seen in North Carolina year-round.

States such as Virginia, Tennessee, and Georgia border North Carolina and as such, have a number of birds that they share in common.

COLORFUL BIRDS OF NORTH CAROLINA

Below is a list of birds of North Carolina that you can find in your backyard. The birds have pictures as well as bird identifier information. Whether you are looking for brown birds or more first bank richmond in birds, you are sure to find them in the list below.

1. Ruby-throated Hummingbird

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird, which is also known as the Archilochus colubris, is a small size hummingbird from North America. The name of the Ruby-throated hummingbird refers to their ruby-colored throat. They are one of the migratory hummingbird species and move towards the south during winter. The upper my region of the Ruby-throated hummingbird are metallic-green colored, and the underparts have white-grey color. Their wings are blackish, and they have a long bill. They use this bill to suck the nectar from different flowers. 

The Ruby-throated hummingbird females are similar to the male, but the young ones lack the iconic ruby-colored throat. The body length of an adult Ruby-throated hummingbird can be between 7 to 9 cm (2.8 to 3.5 in) and they can have a wingspan of up to 8 to 11 cm (3.1 to 4.3 in). The average weight of an adult Ruby-throated hummingbird can be between 2 to 6 g (0.071 to 0.212 oz). They are an extremely small bird species. 

They have a long bill; they use this to sip the nectar from different flowers including many garden plants as well. They birds of eastern north carolina their long bill inside the ovary of the flower and suck up the nectar. They also eat small insects and worms during their flight and migration. They also visit the backyards of the bird feeders that provide them suet and sugared water.

2. House Finch

The House Finch bird, which is also known as the Haemorhous mexicanus, is a small size bird from the Finch family. The House Finch is a very social bird, and it visits the human settlements frequently. They are native to the west but now are found all over the United States. The House Finch is also a very bold and brave bird as it does not hesitate to come closer to humans as well.

The House Finch has a high-pitched sound that male House Finch mostly uses to attract the female for breeding.  An adult House Finch is only 5 to 6 inches long, has a wingspan of 10 inches, and a weight of 21g on average. The House Finch male has a different body plumage and feather color than a female.

The males are brown and have dark brown spots above their wings, meanwhile, the females have brown and grey colored plumage. The House Finches visit the bird feeders to get some food. The House Finches like to eat the small worms, insects, seeds of small plants, and berries of some plants as well.

3. Brown-headed Nuthatch

The Brown-headed Nuthatch bird, which is also known as the Sitta pusilla, is a small size bird from the Sittidae family. The Brown-headed Nuthatch bird is a native to Southeastern America, Mexico. The Brown-headed Nuthatch bird has a beautiful multi-color plumage and a brown head. They have gray-blue, black, brown color in the back and wings and upperparts. The underparts are white-gray and slightly brown. The Brown-headed Nuthatch bird shows the property of dimorphism, the males are slightly different from their females. The females are shorter and have less weight. 

The female Brown-headed Nuthatch bird also has a different plumage color in their bodies as well. The Brown-headed Nuthatch bird has an average length of an adult between 9–11 cm (3.5–4.3 in), and a wingspan that covers almost 16–18 cm (6.3–7.1 in) on the surface. The weight of an adult Brown-headed Nuthatch bird is between 10–12 g (0.35–0.42 oz). The female Brown-headed Nuthatch bird has a high-pitched call that they use for communication. 

The Brown-headed Nuthatch bird mostly eats small size insects of different types. They eat beetles, caterpillars, and flies. They also eat small size seeds and fruits of different types. The bird eats small berries and grains of different plants. They commonly visit the bird feeders to get food and drink water. 

4. Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker which is also known as the Dryobates pubescens, is a small bird from the woodpecker family. The bird has mostly a black plumage color, with white dots above the wings, and black and white stripes over its head. The male and female of this species have a similar plumage color, but the female lacks the small red dot that is seen on the head of the male.

The Downy Woodpecker has a white belly and white spots above their wings as well. The male has more body-weight and wingspan than a female Downy Woodpecker. The body size of the female Downy Woodpeckers is also slightly shorter than the male counterparts. They are frequent visitors to the bird feeders.  They do not travel to farther distances for food.

The Downy Woodpecker likes to eat small-sized insects, worms, seeds, nuts, and berries of the small shrubs. They are attracted to the feeders that provide them suet. They are more frequently seen during the winter in the feeder areas as compared to the summer.

5. Chipping Sparrow

The Chipping Sparrow bird, which is also known as the Spizella passerina, and belongs to the Sparrow family. It is a small-sized songbird with brown, black, and mostly grey plumage, upperparts, and underparts. The Chipping Sparrow is mostly seen in North America during the summer season.

The Chipping Sparrow male and female are mostly like one another and it is hard to identify them. The male in the Chipping Sparrows are slightly heavier, bigger than the females and they also have a slightly bigger belly and wingspan as well. Their black, brown, and grey color is shinier in the males than the females. The male has a beautiful song with a very high pitch, it utilizes this song to attract the females for breeding.

The Chipping Sparrow frequently visits the bird feeders in summer to get some food. They like eating the small worms and their larvae, insects, seeds of small trees, and berries of some plants.

6. Yellow-rumped Warbler

The Yellow-rumped Warbler, which is also known as the Setophaga coronata, is a small-sized bird native to North America and belongs to the Parulidae family of small birds. They have white, black, brown, and yellow color on their back and wings, and neck, while their belly is white with some black stripes that cover the neck part.

They have a body length of 5.9 inches, a wingspan of 10 inches, and a bodyweight of 14 grams. Male and female slightly differ in shape and dimensions. Females have dull colors as compared to males. They visit the feeders frequently, they mostly visit the feeders for the sunflower seeds, raisins, peanut butter, and suet.

Their diet mostly consists of insects, and larvae of insects but they also eat small seeds, fruits, and berries. They produce a melodious tune that they use to attract the female or declare their territory. They are aggressive and mostly displace other birds from their nests if they are around.

7. Eastern Phoebe

The Eastern Phoebe bird, which is also known as the Sayornis phoebe, is a small size bird from the passerine family phoebes. They are also migratory birds and migrate to western parts during the winter. It looks similar to the sparrow in shape but has a different feather color and plumage. They are very small and are only five inches long with a wingspan of usaa flood insurance contact number inches and a bodyweight of 21g.

The male and female have similar body size and shape, but males weigh more than the females and females have duller plumage than an adult male. The bird has a grey-white brownish chest and brown blackish wings and tail. The beak and eyes are black.

The Eastern Phoebe frequently visits the bird feeders in different areas during the summer to get food. They mostly eat seeds, fruits, and berries, and sometimes they also eat insects and small worms.

8. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird, which is also known as the Polioptila caerulea, is a very small songbird from the eastern and southwestern United States, and Mexico. The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird belongs to a bird family known as the Polioptilidae. The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird is known for its blue-gray colored plumage that covers its almost entire body. They are similar in shape and size to the Black-tailed Gnatcatcher bird but unlike them, they do not have a black tail and are genetically slightly different as well.

The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird has blue and gray feathers that cover its entire body. The upper side, black, and upperparts are darker meanwhile the underside is gray. Their belly and breasts appear to gray-white instead of blue-grey. The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird has an average length between 10–13 cm (3.9–5.1 in), with a wingspan that covers on average 6.3 in (16 cm). The weight of an adult Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird is only 5–7 g (0.18–0.25 oz). They live in the bushes and small trees closer to the water bodies.

The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird likes to eat small insects including caterpillars, flies, beetles, and other small insects. They also eat the eggs and larvae of some insects as well. The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher bird also eats small size seeds and grains of small plants. They also eat berries and nuts of some types. They also visit the bird feeders to get food as well.

9. Blue Jay

The Blue Jay bird, which is also known as the Cyanocitta Cristata, is native to eastern North America but also found in different other parts as well. and it belongs to the Corvidae family. They like the woodland environment and they mostly breed in the forests. They have a distinctive blue and white look; the chest of the bird is white while the back and wings are blue.

The male and female both have a similar overall body color, shape and weight, and wingspan. The average body length of the Blue Jay is between 22–30 cm (9–12 in), while the wingspan average of Blue Jay is 34–43 cm (13–17 in). They can weigh up to 100 g or 3.5 oz. The Blue Jay also has a feathery crown on its head, they use this crown to express their feelings or mood.

The Blue Jay also has a black collar line across the neck. They like eating nuts, seeds, berries, soft fruits, and some insects and worms. They are excellent at cracking different kinds of nuts. They breed in the trees; the female protects the eggs and young birds when the eggs hatch while the male provides her all the food during this period. They stay with their parents for almost two months, and then they are ready to fly alone.

10. Tufted Titmouse

The Tufted Titmouse bird, which is also known as the Baeolophus Atricristatus, is a small-sized songbird, native to North America. It has a black crest/crown over its head. Their body length can be between 5.6-6.2 in (13-16 cm), while their wingspan can be between 7.9-10.2 in (20-26 cm), and the body-weight of an adult Tufted Titmouse can be between 20 to 26 g (0.6 to 1 oz.). Male and female, both have a similar body shape, weight color, and size. They look identical but you can identify them with the help of their tufted crest.

The Tufted Titmouse has a white belly and grey upper body. They also have rust-color flanks all over their upper body. The forehead of the Tufted Titmouse is black, while they have a tufted grey crest/crown above their heads. They have a very sweet and nice song with 20+ different variations in their rhythms. They use these different rhymes in different conditions and produce a different kind of song depending upon the situation.

They do not create an open nest like many other birds, they use the holes in the tree trunks and build their nests inside to protect their eggs. They like to eat the grains, seeds from the different small plants and herbs. They also eat small berries, nuts, and small fruits. Apart from these, the Tufted Titmouse also eats caterpillars, insects, ants, wasps, and hornets.

11. Song Sparrow

The Song Sparrow bird, which is also known as the Melospiza melodia, is a small-sized songbird with a beautiful voice. It produces a sweet sound to communicate with other Song Sparrows, this sweet song is melodious. The bird has a brown plumage color. Their whole body is covered with small brown feathers. These brown feathers also contain black spots. The bird has a brownish belly and underparts with black markings.

The male and female of this species look very similar to one another. Both have a similar plumage color and body shape. The male of this species has a slightly bigger body size, weight, and wingspan. Male and female mate mostly during the mating season, females lay eggs and sit on them while the male provides the food and protection.

The Song Sparrow mostly eats the worms and small insects including the larvae of different small insects. They also eat the green seeds of small plants and shrubs. The Song Sparrow also eats the berries of different small trees.

12. Northern Mockingbird

The Northern Mockingbird, which is also known as the Mimus polyglottos, is the only species of Mockingbirds found in North America. This is a permanent resident in the northern states and does not migrate. They frequently visit the backyards of the bird feeders to get food.

The Northern Mockingbird has gray upperparts and whitish-gray underparts. The bird has longer legged than many other birds of the same size and has a long tail as well. The male Northern Mockingbird looks like the females as both have the same plumage color and a similar size, shape, and wingspan. The males are heavier than the females in weight. Black feathers are also a part of their long tail and wings.

The Northern Mockingbirds can live up to 20 years. They frequently visit bird feeders in different areas. The Northern Mockingbird likes eating small grains, seeds of grass, fruits, berries, worms, and small insects.

13. Dark-eyed Junco

The Snowbird or Dark-eyed Junco bird, which is also known as the Junco hyemalis, is a small-sized bird from the junco family. They are frequent visitors to the bird feeders in the different parts of the United States, but they are mostly seen during the winter. The Dark-eyed Juncos are from the north but spend most of their time in the south in search of food and shelter, as the winter in the North is extremely cold and the bird needs a little warm environment and food.

They are a migratory gpa requirements for south carolina state university and keep migrating from one place to another for various reasons.  They visit the south during the winter and move back to the north during the summer. The male and female of this species are like each other, but females have slightly brown plumage while the males have black and grey plumage. The females are also shorter in size than the males and weigh less than their male counterparts as well.

The Dark-eyed Junco has a high-pitched voice that it uses to attract females for breeding. The Dark-eyed Junco mostly eats the small insects and worms, this makes up almost 60% of its entire food, they also eat the small seeds, nuts, and berries of small trees and plants.

14. Eastern Towhee

The Eastern Towhee bird, which is also known as the Pipilo erythrophthalmus, is a small size new world sparrow bird from the Passerellidae family of passerine songbirds. The Eastern Towhee bird is also called the rufous-sided towhee as they have markings on the rufous. They have a beautiful appearance and show a mixture of black, white, brown, and redcolors in their plumage. These are also migratory bird species, and they migrate to different parts of the United States.  

The Eastern Towhee bird has a white belly and has rufous on both sides. They have a long and dark black tail with white spots or edges. The Eastern Towhee bird has red eyes. The males are birds of eastern north carolina different from the females. The females have a brownish tail and upper body while the males have a black tail and upper body parts. The Eastern Towhee bird has an average body length between 17.3 to 23 cm (6.8 to 9.1 in), and they have an average wingspan that covers almost 20–30 cm (7.9–11.8 in). The weight of an adult male Eastern Towhee bird can be between 32 to 53 g (1.1 to 1.9 oz).  

The Eastern Towhee bird nests in the bushes or the small trees. They have a sweet song that they use to call for mating. The Eastern Towhee bird eats almost all kinds of small insects including flies, beetles, and worms as well. They also eat green vegetable matter, seeds, grains, berries, and small fruits. They also visit the bird feeders to get some food. 

15. American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch bird, which is also known as the Spinus tristis, is a small-sized songbird native to the different regions of North America. They are a very beautiful bird species, their plumage has more bright color than many other birds. Male and female of this species look similar except that the female has no black spot on their heads like the male counterparts.

The bird has beautiful yellow plumage, the underparts and upperparts are also yellow. While the wings of the American Goldfinch are black. The surface below the wings of American Goldfinch is white. Their tail has black feathers, with small white markings. Their beak is bright yellowish pink. The male and female almost have similar size, weight, and wingspan.

The American Goldfinch likes eating small insects, different berries, and seeds of the small herbs and shrubs. They are very social but maintain a distance when it comes to humans, do not try to get close to them otherwise, they will fly away.

16. Red-eyed Vireo

The Red-eyed Vireo bird, which is also known as the Vireo olivaceus, is a small size songbird native to North America. The Red-eyed Vireo bird appears to be similar to the new world warbler bird but genetically they are totally different from one another. This is also one of the most common birds among North American bird species. They are also a migratory bird that migrates towards the South during the winter. The adult, Red-eyed Vireo bird has an olive-brown plumage.  

Underparts are white while the upperparts are olive green. The Red-eyed Vireo bird also has a red iris and a black-edged crown. Their bill is long and is pointy at the end. The young, Red-eyed Vireo bird is slightly different from the grown-ups, they first national bank southern california paler than the adults. The body length of an adult can be between 4.7-5.1 in (12-13 cm), and they can have a wingspan of about 9.1-9.8 in (23-25 cm). The weight of an adult, Red-eyed Vireo can be between 12 to 26 grams. 

The female lays four to 6 eggs and sits on them till they hatch. They eat small insects of different types including caterpillars, mosquitos, worms, and ants. They also eat small veggie objects such as berries and small fruits. They also visit the bird feeders of different areas during their routes.

17. Tn election new voter id online registration Nuthatch

The White-Breasted Nuthatch bird, which is also known as the Sitta carolinensis, is a small-sized songbird from the nuthatch family. They are very commonly found in temperate North American regions. They have a short tail, big head, strong bill, and feet. Their face, flanks, and chests are white, while the cap is black, and their back is blue-grey. They have 9 different varieties that can be easily identified by their plumage color.

The White-breasted Nuthatches have a maximum body length of 14 cm or 5.5 inches, while they have a maximum wingspan of 27cm or 10 inches almost. Their body weight ranges between 0.6 oz to 1.0 oz. The male and female have slightly different body shapes, and colors on their back. They can produce different types of songs, depending upon the situation.

They frequently visit bird feeders to get some food. They mostly eat insects and seeds of small plants and shrubs. They also eat and store the nuts of different plants such as hickory in the tree trunks, they eat these trunks during the winter season.

18. European Starling

The European Starling bird, which is also known as the Sturnus vulgaris is a small size bird found in the North American States. The European Starling belongs to the starling family. The bird has a beautiful and colorful plumage that covers its whole body. They are only 8 inches long and have a wingspan of 13 inches.

The European Starling has a shiny black plumage color. Their upperparts and wings also have some blueish black feathers, that give it a beautiful appearance. The male and female have an almost similar appearance, but females are slightly shorter in body size, weight, and wingspan. Some of the females also have a different plumage color as well, instead of black they have brown plumage all over their bodies.

It is also a frequent visitor to bird feeders in different areas. The European Starling likes to eat small insects, worms, small seeds, and berries. It mostly gets its food from the trees and soil, but sometimes it also visits the feeders to get its food.

19. Pine Warbler

The Pine Warbler bird, which is also known as the Setophaga pinus, is a small size new world warbler bird from the Parulidae. This songbird is known to have a beautiful call that it uses to attract females and to communicate with others. They are called pine warbler because they are mostly seen foraging the branches and trunks of the pine trees. The pine warbler is a migratory bird and moves from North to South during the winter. The plumage of this bird has a white belly and white wing bars. They also have a longer bill that birds of eastern north carolina use to forage on the ground and pines. 

The Pine Warbler adults have a complete olive-yellow plumage, their breasts and upperparts are all covered with olive-yellow colors. Females and young Pine Warblers show a slightly different body color from the males. They have slightly pale breasts and throats. The body length of an adult pine warbler is between 5–5.75 in (127–146 mm), and they can have a wingspan of up to 8.75 in (222 mm). The weight of an adult Pine Warbler can be upto 12 g (0.42 oz). 

The Pine Warbler bird eats small insects, seeds, grains of wheat, and pine nuts. They forage on the branches of trees and ground to look for food. They live in deep woods and rarely visit the backyards of the bird feeders to get some food.

20. Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-bellied Woodpecker bird, which is also known as the Melanerpes carolinus, is known for its red-colored belly. This is a bird from the Woodpecker family, known for its woodpecker habit. They have a very strong beak that they use to dig into the trees and create holes of different sizes and shapes. The bird has black and white wings and back, while a red neck and head.

This small-sized bird has a high-pitched melodious tone, it uses this to attract the females for mating. Males are slightly heavier and bigger than the females, male mostly weigh around 73g while the female’s weight is only 65g. The males also have a slightly bigger wingspan than the females.

They have a strong beak, and they use this beak to cut through the woods. They create circular holes in the woods with their beak. Their food includes different kinds of insects, worms, seeds, berries, and nuts.

21. Common Grackle

The Common Grackle bird, which is also known as the Quiscalus quiscula is a large size bird from the Icterids family of songbirds, Native to North America. This bird has white eyes with a small black spot in them. They are longer in size, have a slate black bill, and a lengthy tail. They are a permanent resident of the North but also migrate to some other parts as well.

The bird has black wings, a shiny blow neck, and black underparts. Male and female are almost look-alikes and cannot be differentiated based on their appearance. The male and female populations of grackles are slightly different from one another, but it is hard to identify them separately from a distance.

They frequently visit the bird feeders to get their food. They are omnivorous and eat a lot of different things. They eat small birds, mice, insects, worms, minnow, frogs, eggs, berries, seeds, and small grains of crops. They fight other birds to snatch their food as well.

22. Indigo Bunting

The Indigo Bunting bird, which is also known as the Passerina cyanea, is a small size seed-eating bird from the cardinal family, Cardinalidae. This bird is native to North America but migrates towards the South during the winter season. They can see through the darkness and even through the night. They mostly travel in the night when migrating and spend their days searching for food. The Indigo Bunting bird is all covered with an indigo blue colored plumage; hence they are named indigo. 

The male Indigo Buntings are covered with a shiny blue, indigo plumage, their wings, back, face, upperparts, belly, and underparts are all indigo, meanwhile, the females are brown. The male Indigo Bunting also has some blackish shade in its wings. The females have brown and dark brown upperparts and grey-white underparts. The body length of an adult Indigo Bunting bird can be between 11.5–13 cm (4.5–5.1 in) and it can have a wingspan that can cover almost 18–23 cm (7.1–9.1 in). The weight of an adult breeding male bird can be between 11.2–21.4 g (0.40–0.75 oz). 

The Indigo Bunting is known for its seeds eating habit, they live almost entirely on the seeds that they find from fields. They search the ground and expose the seeds and eat them. Apart from the seeds, they also eat grains, fruits, berries, and vegetative matter. The Indigo Bunting bird also eats small size insects as well. They also visit the bird feeders in different areas to get some food.

23. Belted Kingfisher

The Belted Kingfisher bird, which is also known as the Megaceryle alcyon, is a medium size bird from the kingfisher family, known for a belt around its neck. Their heads have a shaggy crest and have a long and strong bill. The females of this species are brighter than the males and have more vibrant colors. They have a slate blue head, large white collar, a large blue band on the breast, and white underparts, they also have blue and black wings with white dots.

The male Belted Kingfisher measures between 27 to 34 cm (10.9 to 13.9 in) in body length with a wingspan that ranges between 47 to 57 cm (18 to 22.9 in). The weight of an adult Belted Kingfisher ranges between 113 to 178 g (4.0 to 6.3 oz). As they show reverse dimorphism, the females are bigger than the males and have a larger wingspan and more weight as well.

The Belted Kingfisher nests near the 1st grade color by number worksheets bodies, canals, lakes, and River lands. They eat small amphibians, small fishes, insects, small mammals, and some reptiles as well. The females lay eggs and sit on them until they hatch. The male provides food to their young ones and the female as well. 

24. Pileated Woodpecker

The Pileated Woodpecker bird, which is also known as the Dryocopus pileatus is a medium size bird from the woodpecker family and native to America. This bird is especially known for its pileated red cap. This red-colored crest above its head helps you easily identify them.

They look like the other woodpecker species, except for their red cap/crest above their head. This peculiar cap separates them from the other species of Woodpeckers. An adult Pileated Woodpecker has an average body size of 17 inches, with a wingspan of almost 28 inches on average. The weight of an adult woodpecker can be between 8 to 24 oz. The male and female Pileated Woodpecker look slightly different. The males have a red line while the females have a black line that goes from their bill to the throat. The male has black wings meanwhile the females have slightly brown wings.

Like all the other woodpeckers they also dig holes in the tree trunks. They visit the bird feeders frequently to get their food. They eat different types of insects, worms, larvae of worms and insects, seeds of grass, and grains of small size. They also eat different fruits, berries, and vegetables.

25. Great Crested Flycatcher

The Great Crested Flycatcher bird, which is also known as the Myiarchus crinitus, is a large insect-eating flycatcher bird from the tyrant flycatcher family. The Great Crested Flycatcher bird is native to North America and some regions of Mexico. They have a crest above their heads, that is why they are called Great Crested Flycatcher birds. They are one of the most abundant birds in North America. The Great Crested Flycatcher bird has a beautiful plumage that has brownish upperparts and lemon-yellow underparts. 

The Great Crested Flycatcher bird has a rusty brown colored bushy crest. The throat and breast part of the Great Crested Flycatcher bird is gray. The male and female birds both have a similar plumage color. The body length of an adult Great Crested Flycatcher can be between 17–21 cm (6.7–8.3 in), and they can have a wingspan that covers almost 34 cm (13 in). The average weight of an adult flycatcher bird is between 27–40 g (0.95–1.41 oz). 

The Great Crested Flycatcher female lays four to eight eggs and sits on them till they hatch. The male protects the nest and provides food. The young ones appear like the adults but have a little pale and dull plumage color. The Great Crested Flycatcher eats almost all kinds of small insects. They also eat small size seeds, grains, and fruits with flesh. The Great Crested Flycatcher visits the bird feeders occasionally to get some food. 

26. Mourning Dove

The Mourning Dove bird, which is also known as the Zenaida macroura is a medium-sized bird from the dove family. Its plumage is all covered with rusty brown color. The plumage also has a few black spots above the wings. The Mourning Dove is a frequent visitor to the bird feeders in the different parts of the United States.

Female and male Mourning Doves almost look identical in body shapes and dimensions. They also have a similar brown and white plumage. They can reach up to 12 inches in body length while their wingspan can be up to 18 inches. Their body weight can be up to 120g. Their appearance makes it easier to spot and identify them.

The male and female mate during the spring and winter, the male attracts the female with its beautiful mating call like the song. The female lays eggs and sits on them while gpa requirements for south carolina state university male provides food and protection to the female and eggs. The Mourning Dove visit the bird feeders that provide them nuts, seeds, and insect-based bird feeds. They also eat the small worms picked up from the ground or the trees.

27. Red-winged Blackbird

The Red-winged Blackbird bird, which is also known as the Agelaius phoeniceus, is mostly identified with its black plumage color and red wings. The female of this species is different from the males. The females have a different body plumage color. They have a mixture of black, brown, and red colors in their plumage.

The Red-winged Blackbird is seen in almost all the Northern States. The bird has a complete black plumage, with a bright red spot on its wings. They have a shiny black color that depicts a blue shade when exposed to the sunlight. Male and females are different from each other, the males have a bigger body size, more bright plumage color, and more weight as compared to the females. The male and female are easy to see and identify them separately.

The Red-winged Blackbird likes eating worms, small insects including spiders, and many other insect larvae, they also eat the seeds, cracked nuts, and berries of different trees and shrubs.

28. White-throated Sparrow

The White-throated Sparrow bird, which is also known as the Zonotrichia albicollis, is a small-sized songbird from the sparrow family Passalidae. This bird is native to the northern playstation store india gift card of America. They are known for their white throats.

They are very small in size and have a body length between 15 to 19cm with a wingspan between 23cm only. The body-weight of an adult White-Throated Sparrow is between 20 to 30 g. The adults have stripes on their plumage, they have two black and a white stripe in the middle of their head. The male and female almost have a similar appearance, body size, and colors. They create their breeding nests on the ground or in the small-sized shrubs.

Their diet mostly consists of seeds and grains of small crops and herbs, berries, and insects. They eat worms, spiders, and other small insects that are found on the trees or crawling on the ground.

29. Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker bird, which is also known as the Colaptes auratus, Yellowhammer, and a Common Flicker.  It is a bird from the woodpecker family. It is a migratory bird and mostly keeps traveling. They build their nests in the deep woods. The Northern Flicker has a similar appearance to the Downy Woodpecker, but it lacks the red dot above the head and its plumage is duller.

The bird has all brown, white, and black plumage. The upperparts and wings are brown with black dots while the underparts and belly are brownish greys with black spots. The male and female also have pinkish feathers below their tail. The male and the female of the Northern Flickers are similar, but the male has a red neck ring that females do not have. Also, the weight, size, and wingspan of the males are higher than the females.

The male has a high-pitched melodious tone that it uses to attract the females for breeding. They are frequent visitors to feeders in different areas. They visit the feeders to get their food during the summer. They mostly eat insects, larvae, worms, seeds, nuts, and berries of different types.

30. Eastern Bluebird

The Eastern Bluebird, which is also known as the Sialia sialis, is a small size bird that belongs to a family of North American songbirds known as the Turdidae. It is mostly found in farmlands, orchids, gardens, and open woods. It is a frequent visitor to the different parts of the United States and mostly visits the feeders. It produces a beautiful melody with its vocals.

The Eastern Bluebird is mostly known for its blue wings, head, and upperparts. They have an orange-brown collar around their necks. Their belly is fat and white, their tail is also blue. They have a body length between 16–21 cm (6.3–8.3 in), their wingspan is between 25–32 cm (9.8–12.6 in) and they weigh almost 27–34 g (0.95–1.20 oz. The male and female are almost identical and there is no special difference between them, the only difference between males and females is their color, the males are blue while the females are dull blue to brownish pale in color.

Their diet mainly consists of small fruits, berries, seeds, and worms. Worms and insects are the major food items for the grown-up Eastern Bluebird. They eat grasshoppers, crickets, beetles, and katydids.

31. Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird, which is also known as home remedies for nausea from drinking Molothrus ater, is a medium size bird native to North America. The Brown-headed Cowbird is a migratory bird that travels from one place to another depending upon the food availability, weather, and climate situations. The bird has a similar shape to the normal crow, but it has a more colorful back. They mostly visit the north during the summer season.

The Brown-headed Cowbird has all-black plumage, except the head and neck, this part of the body of the Brown-headed Cowbird is brown instead of black. The black plumage of this bird reflects a more bluish-black color rather than pure black. The male plumage is shiny and more colorful than females. The female’s plumage is brown black. The females are shorter than the males and have less wingspan and weight. Females can be easily spotted among the flock as they are different in color than the normal males.

The bird produces a high pitch tune to attract the females for mating. They are migratory birds and mostly they are traveling from one place to another. The Brown-headed Cowbird eats different kinds of insects, worms, plant seeds, fruits, and berries.

32. Common Yellowthroat

The Common Yellowthroat bird, which is also known as the Geothlypis trichas, is a small size, new world warbler bird from the Parulidae family. They are seen in large numbers all over North America. As the name suggests this bird has a lemon-yellow throat. The body of the Common Yellowthroat bird is all covered with light yellow to greenish-yellow plumage. The Common Yellowthroat bird has a black streak that goes from the beak to the eyes and towards the back of the head. The Common Yellowthroat bird has an olive-colored back.  

The wings and upper parts of the bird are all covered with a greenish-yellow color. The male and female of the Common Yellowthroat bird are slightly different from one another (sexual dimorphism). The males have a black mask that covers their entire face, but the females lack this mask. This makes the males and females to be easily spotted and differentiated into separate sexes. The Common Yellowthroat bird has an average body length between 4.3-5.1 in (11-13 cm), and a wingspan that covers almost 5.9-7.5 in (15-19 cm). The Common Yellowthroat bird has an average weight of about 0.3-0.3 oz (9-10 g).  

The Common Yellowthroat bird forages in the branches of the trees and on the ground in search of food. They mostly eat seeds, green fruits, berries, and sometimes nuts. The Common Yellowthroat bird also eats small size insects of different types including caterpillars, spiders, and beetles. 

33. Carolina Chickadee

The Carolina Chickadee bird, which is also known as the Poecile carolinensis, is a small size passerine bird from the tit family Paridae. They live in the woodlands and places near the water bodies. The Carolina Chickadee bird has a black-capped head and white line below the eyes that goes back towards the wings. They have a dark black color cord near the neck. The upperparts and wings of the bird are gray-brown. 

The Carolina Chickadee bird has light brown colored underparts and breasts. The Carolina Chickadee bird also has a long tail. They have a short but strong beak. The body length of an adult Carolina Chickadee bird is between 11.5–13 cm (4.5–5.1 in), with a total wingspan of 15–18 cm (6–7 in). An adult Carolina Chickadee bird has an average weight between 9–12 g (0.32–0.42 oz). The male and female are identical and hard to identify separately. This bird builds its nest hidden in the deep woods to protect itself and its eggs from predators. 

The Carolina Chickadee bird is an insectivore bird and eats small size insects, including larvae and eggs of some insects as well. They also eat the small size grains, seeds of bushes and plants. They eat small berries, nuts, and fruits as well. They also visit the bird feeders in the regions to get some food. They mostly visit the bird feeders that provide them suet as food. 

34. Cedar Waxwing

The Cedar Waxwing bird, which is also known as the Bombycilla cedrorum, is a medium size bird from the Bombycillidae or Waxwing family of the birds. It is a passerine songbird and has a high-pitched call that they use for communication. The Cedar Waxwing bird is one of the smallest species of waxwing birds in North America. The Cedar Waxwing bird has brown plumage with shiny silky, gray, lemon yellow phone number santander customer service. They also have a black mask that covers the entire face region. Their wings have a bright red dot in the middle of brown silky feathers.  

This bird also has a crest above its head that is also brown. The Cedar Waxwing bird has black eyes and a streak that stretches from the eyes towards the back of the head. Their beak is short but strong enough to break the nuts and small insects. The Cedar Waxwing bird can have a body length that spans almost 6–7 in (15–18 cm) and a wingspan that covers 8.7-11.8 in (22-30 cm) area. The weight of an adult Cedar Waxwing bird is about 30g. The Cedar Waxwing bird breeds in the open woods and the female sits on the eggs.  

The male provides for the female till the eggs hatch and the female can also fly away and search for food. The Cedar Waxwing bird eats a lot of different types of small berries and fruits of small plants including the junipers, dogwood, serviceberry, and cedar as well. This bird also eats small size insects including caterpillars, spiders, and worms. They also visit the bird feeders to get some food if they nest near a human neighborhood. 

35. Brown Thrasher

The Brown Thrasher bird, which is also known as the Toxostoma rufum, is a large size bird from the thrasher family commonly known as the Mimidae. The bird is genetically related to the mockingbirds. The Brown Thrasher bird is commonly seen in the different rocky regions of the United States and birds of eastern north carolina parts of the world as well. As their name suggests, the bird is covered entirely with brown plumage. They have patches of dark brown to black color above their wings and upper parts of the plumage. The underparts, belly, and breasts area of the bird’s body is covered with brownish-gray colored plumage. 

The male and female Brown Thrasher bird are similar in shape, color, and body size, that is why it is hard to identify the sexes. The young ones of the Brown Thrasher bird have dull colors and no plumage in the early days. The Brown Thrasher bird has an average body size range between 23.5 to 30.5 cm (9.3 to 12.0 in) and has a wingspan of 29 to 33 cm (11 to 13 in). The average weight of an adult Brown Thrasher bird is between 61 to 89 g (2.2 to 3.1 oz). The male appeared to be slightly bigger than the females.

The female Brown Thrasher bird lays between three to five eggs and sits on them till they hatch. The male provides food for these days. The Homes for rent in anneewakee trails douglasville ga Thrasher bird mostly eats small size insects and small worms. They also eat the larvae of suntrust bank business loans insects. The Brown Thrasher bird also eats small size seeds, grains, fruits, and berries of some birds. They visit the bird feeders regularly if the feeders provide them suet and other foods of this type. 

36. Gray Catbird

The Gray Catbird, which is also known as the Dumetella carolinensis is a medium size bird from the mimid peoples bank sri lanka online balance check of small and medium-size birds. This songbird is native to Central and North America but now is seen in the different other parts of as well. Their population migrates to the other states during the winter, that is why they are less often spotted during the Winter.

The size of an adult Gray Catbird is only 8 inches on average, with a wingspan of 11 inches. The weight of an adult Gray Catbird is between 30 to 50 grams. The whole body of the Gray Catbird is covered with lead-gray feathers. The wings and head parts are darker than the belly and neck parts of the body. Male and female of the Gray Catbird species are the same as one another, that is why it is hard to identify them.

The male has a beautiful and melodious voice that attracts the females for breeding. They visit the bird feeders to get their food. They visit more frequently ulta beauty store near me the summer. The Gray Catbird eats small worms and insects. They also eat fruits and berries of different small plants. They eat the seeds and grains of different small shrubs and grasses as well.

37. American Robin

The American Robin bird, which is also known as the Turdus migratorius, is a small-sized red and black colored, migratory songbird. It travels to different parts of the United States. Its shape and size resemble the European Robin, but it lives in the United States of America, that’s why it is named the America Robin.

The male American Robin is different from the female ones, the male American robins have more colorful plumage as compared to the female. The females have duller colors, while the male American Robins have the brightest colors. The body size and shape also differ between the male and female, the body of females is thin, and smaller while the body of a male is slightly bigger than the female.

The male sings a song to attract the female during the mating season, the female protects the eggs and sits on them while the male provides the food and protection during this. They like to eat small insects and their larvae, small nuts, and berries. They also eat the seeds of small bushes and shrubs.

38. Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal bird, which is also known as the Cardinalis cardinalis, is a small-sized songbird known for its beautiful plumage. The male of this species has a red-colored plumage with a bright red shade. While the female Northern Cardinals have duller colors. They are very easy to identify as the male and female have different color and body shape and size.

 The body length of a Northern Cardinal is between 21–23.5 cm (8.3–9.3 in), while the whole wingspan of the Northern Cardinals can be between 25–31 cm (9.8–12.2 in). They weigh almost 33.6–65 g (1.19–2.29 oz).

The Northern Cardinal has a red beak, red plumage, with a few black and white spots on their feathers. The Northern Cardinals like to eat small insects, including spiders, worms. They also earth the crushed nuts, small seeds of different herbs, and the berries of different small trees and plants.

39. Ruby-crowned Kinglet

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet bird, which is also known as the Regulus calendula, is a small size passerine bird from the kinglet family Regulidae. These birds are native to North America but migrate towards the south during the winter. Their common name refers to the small crown that they have above their heads. This bird is known to have gray-green upperparts and olive-green underparts. Their wings contain two white wing bars, that are masked by a dark layer of feathers. 

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet bird has a plain face and head. Female Ruby-crowned Kinglet birds have a similar plumage color, but they do not have the iconic crown that they are known for. The young Ruby-crowned Kinglet birds are also similar to the female. The body length of an adult Ruby-crowned Kinglet bird can be between 9 to 11 cm (3.5 to 4.3 in) and they can have a wingspan of upto 16 to 18 cm (6.3 to 7.1 in). The average body weight of an adult Ruby-crowned Kinglet bird can be between 5 to 10 g (0.2 to 0.4 oz). 

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet forages in the branches of trees in search of small insects. They mostly eat these small insects and worms as food. They also eat small fruits and berries and tree sap. They also visit the bird feeder’s backyards to get some food.

40. Carolina Wren

The Carolina Wren bird, which is also known as the Thryothorus ludovicianus, is a small size merrill lynch bank of america near me from the wren family. The bird is known for its beautiful brown colored plumage. The Carolina Wren bird builds its nest in the deep woods and farm edges and barns. They also do not hesitate to come closer to humans. The body of the Carolina Wren bird is all covered with a chestnut brown color. Their shoulders and some parts of their face have white markings and patches. Their wings are marked with dark brown to light brown color markings.  

The Carolina Wren bird has a pointy beak, which is slightly larger than the normal wren species. This bird shows a dimorphism, meaning that the males and females are slightly different from one another. The males are bigger and heavier, they also have a larger wingspan as well. The body length of an adult male is between 12.5 to 14 cm (4.9 to 5.5 in), and they have a wingspan of 29 cm (11 in). The body size and wingspan of the male are 11% higher than the female. The average weight of an adult Carolina Wren bird is between 18 to 23 g (0.63 to 0.81 oz) with males being always heavier than the females of the same age.  

The Carolina Wren birds can live up to 10 years. Their diet includes small size insects, including spiders, caterpillars, and flies. They also eat small seeds, grains of the small plants. The Carolina Wren bird also eats small size berries and fruits of different trees. As they live near the neighborhoods, they frequently visit the bird feeders to get some food. 

HUMMINGBIRDS FOUND IN NORTH Capital one online bill pay service is a list of hummingbirds you can find in North Carolina. The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is by far the most observed hummingbird in North Carolina. The name, hummingbird, comes as a result of the humming noise these tiny birds make. One unique feature of these birds is that they are the only specifies of birds that can fly backward. These birds on average weigh less than a nickel!

The list below is sorted by most to least observed hummingbirds.

  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Black-chinned Hummingbird

RED COLORED BIRDS FOUND IN NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina has a number of beautiful birds, and the red-colored birds are one of them. Below are birds with some or all red colorings. The Northern Cardinal is the most observed bird in North Carolina.

BIRDS FOUND DURING WINTER IN NORTH CAROLINA

Below are some common birds you can find during winter in North Carolina.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

  1. Question: What are some commonly birds seen year round in North Carolina?

    Some of the most commonly seen birds year-round in North Carolina are the Eastern Phoebe, Blue Jay, Carolina Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch, Brown-headed Nuthatch, Carolina Wren, European Starling, Gray Catbird, Northern Mockingbird, and the Eastern Bluebird.

  2. Question: What is the state bird of North Carolina?

    The beautiful Northern Cardinal is the state bird of North Carolina.

  3. Question: What is the most commonly bird seen in North Carolina?

    The most commonly bird seen in North Carolina is the Northern Cardinal.

  4. Question: How many specifies of birds are there in North Carolina?

    There are more than 482 species of birds in North Carolina.

  5. Question: What is the largest bird found in North Carolina?

    The largest bird found in North Carolina is the great horned owl. This bird is also known as the tiger owl.  This bird can grow up to 26 inches in length with a 62-inch wingspan. 

  6. Question: Are Golden Eagles found in North Carolina?

    Yes, in fact, some recent research conducted by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission has found that the Southern Appalachians may be an important wintering ground for the Golden Eagle.

NORTH CAROLINA BIRD CLUBS

BIRDING LOCATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA

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Birds In North Carolina
Birds In North Carolina

There isn’t any state east of the Mississippi river with a larger population than North Carolina. And that doesn’t only apply to humans, but birds as well.

The Old North state, as it’s commonly called, is the 28th largest state. It comprises nearly 54,000 square miles, and 470 bird species use it as their home or breeding location.

The variety of lands in the state account for the various creatures living in it. As a matter of fact, it’s home to the highest mountains in the Eastern US.

Out of the 470 species, there are 25 types of birds in North Carolina to watch out for. Here’s a list classified by color to make matters easier for you!

Red Birds in North Carolina

Northern Cardinal

  • Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis
  • Length: 8.3–9.1 inches
  • Weight: 1.5–1.7 ounces
  • Wingspan: 9.8–12.2 inches

Northern cardinals are the official state bird of North Carolina, which gives you an idea of how common the bird is there.

This familiar bird is the most common backyard bird in the US. They have a distinctive appearance with their thick bills and round red bodies with a few white spots on their feathers. 

You’ll mostly find them on low shrubs or tree branches. However, they also forage close to the ground frequently in search of worms.

Their call sounds like cheer cheer cheer.

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

  • Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus
  • Length: 9.4 inches
  • Weight: 2–3.2 ounces
  • Wingspan: 13–16.5 inches

Red-bellied woodpeckers only have red on top of their heads. Otherwise, they gained their name because their bellies blush a deep red.

Their wings are a seamless blend of white and black feathers, and they’re easily identified from other woodpeckers because they don’t have crests. 

This woodpecker species lives in North Carolina all year round, so your chances of seeing them are pretty high.

The adult woodpecker mostly sticks to its territory unless it’s migrating. And, this common feeder bird will visit sites that provide sunflower seeds or peanuts.

House Finch

  • Scientific Name: Haemorhous mexicanus
  • Length: 5–6 inches
  • Weight: 0.6–0.9 ounces
  • Wingspan: 8–10 inches

House finches first appeared in North Carolina in the late 1960s. Merely a decade later, their population significantly surged across the whole state.

Now, you can find house finches in any part of the state you’re visiting.

It’s easy to identify these birds because they have red upper bodies. Their wings are a mix of brown and beige shades.

Bear in mind, though, that female house finches don’t have a hint of red in their bodies. So you’ll only be looking for the males.

Red-Winged Blackbird

  • Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus
  • Length: 9–10 inches
  • Weight: 2.5–3 ounces
  • Wingspan: 12–16 inches

Red-winged blackbirds are unlike any other red bird you may see.

They have black bodies adorned by red shoulder caps that stand out in striking contrast. You can spot that red patch a mile away.

These birds are year-round residents of North Carolina. They prefer staying near marshes in the summer, and they inhabit meadows and pastures when the weather gets cold.

Blackbirds love to make their presence known. So when they feel someone is watching them, they’ll perch high and start singing.

Blue Birds in North Carolina

Blue Jay

 

  • Scientific Name: Cyanocitta cristata
  • Length: 9–12 inches
  • Weight: 2.5–3.5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 13–17 inches

If you’ve been living in the US for a long time, you’ve probably encountered the Blue Jay a few times. You’ll remember their appearance because one of the most visually appealing birds in the world.

Except for some individuals with lavender plumage, Blue Jays have blue bodies–obviously! You can easily identify them by looking for the unique blue color on their wings, ample tail, and back.

If you synovus student checking account to see this beautiful bird species, fill your feeder with peanuts and sunflower seeds. You may even get lucky and hear the hawk-like sound that they use to interact with their fellows.

Mountain Bluebird

  • Scientific Name: Sialia currucoides
  • Length: 6.5–8 inches
  • Weight: 1–1.5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 11–14 inches

Mountain bluebirds look like balls of blue ice. The sky blue on their bodies isn’t too vibrant, but it’s bright like it just came out of a freezer—almost like the sky’s color on a cold November morning.

Only the males have this beautiful plumage. The females have gray plumage with pale blue tinges on their tails and around their wings.

These birds are known 1st birthday theme ideas pouncing on their insect prey from above. So, they’re often seen hovering and perching on high branches of trees.

You can find them near high elevations, and they breed in prairies and alpine tundra.

Lazuli Bunting

  • Scientific Name: Passerina amoena
  • Length: 5–6 inches
  • Weight: 0.5–0.7 ounces
  • Wingspan: 8.7–9 inches

Lazuli buntings look exactly like indigo buntings from the neck up. However, the rest of their bodies look more like grosbeaks.

They have a bright blue head and pale peachy front. Their underbelly is white, and their wings are a blend of these colors, in addition to gray.

You can find lazuli buntings in various places, including streams, agricultural fields, and wooded valleys. They’re also frequent visitors to residential gardens.

Eastern Bluebird

  • Scientific Name: Sialia sialis
  • Length: 7–8 inches
  • Weight: 1–2 ounces
  • Wingspan: 11.5–13 inches

Under poor lighting conditions, you may not distinguish this beloved bird from a blue grosbeak or an indigo bunting. 

However, the fact that eastern bluebirds have only three colors on their bodies may help you. They come in blue, peachy, and white colors.

These birds spend most of their time around parks, open fields, and golf courses.

Common Grackle

  • Scientific Name: Quiscalus quiscula
  • Length:L 11–13 inches
  • Weight: 2.6–5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 14–18 inches

Common grackles hold their name to high standards; they’re one of the most common birds in North Carolina all year long and a permanent resident of the state. You can easily catch them if you look closely.

Common grackles have black bodies with distinctive blue heads. They also have iridescent feathers, which add to their allure. 

Grackles eat nearly everything, so it’d be enough to fill your bird feeder with sunflower seeds or whatever you have available. 

Green Birds in North Carolina

Anna’s Hummingbird

  • Scientific Name: Calypte anna
  • Length: 3.9–4.3 inches
  • Weight: 0.1–0.2 ounces
  • Wingspan: 4.7 inches

You won’t have difficulty distinguishing Anna’s hummingbirds from other hummingbirds because of their unique sparkly red heads and iridescent green wings. As you’ve guessed by now, they’re exceedingly beautiful birds. 

If you want to see Anna’s hummingbird’s magical appearance, you should look around gardens and bright-colored blossoms. They’re also pretty common in backyards during spring. 

To study them closely in your backyard, you can attract them with some raisins and seeds in your bird feeder.

Green-Breasted Mango

  • Scientific Name: Anthracothorax prevostii
  • Length: 2–3 inches
  • Weight: 6–6.5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 4.75–5 inches

Green-breasted mangos don’t look like any other green birds. Although they’re hummingbirds like Annas and Calliopes, they have distinctive bodies with colorful plumage.

Their bills are long and arched, and their tails are bright red or orange under the sunlight. They have a flower-like shape that spreads out behind the birds as they fly.

Mangos’ feathers are iridescent, so they look shiny under strong lighting.

In North Carolina, you can see green mangos in rural areas, but they’re not too common. Sightings in the states have been declining in the past ten years.

Buff-Bellied Hummingbird

  • Scientific Name: Amazilia yucatanensis
  • Length: 4–4.3 inches
  • Weight: 0.1–0.3 ounces
  • Wingspan: 5–5.75 inches

Buff-bellied hummingbirds are among the rare or accidental sightings in North Carolina. They make occasional appearances in the state, but they don’t stay for long.

They look a bit like green-breasted mangos, but they don’t have the same color combination.

Their gpa requirements for south carolina state university are long and arched, and their tails have the same flowery shape.

Their bodies are green, their wings are dark grey, and their bellies are white. On the front, the green only goes around their necks. 

Calliope Hummingbird

  • Scientific Name: Selasphorus calliope
  • Length: 2.8–3.9 inches
  • Weight: birds of eastern north carolina ounces
  • Wingspan: 4.3 inches

Calliope’s hummingbirds are easily distinguishable from other hummingbirds, mainly because of their unique colors. Males have bright glittery Fuschia necks, while females have shining green wings.

Calliopes are categorized as the smallest birds in North America. Thus, it may be harder to catch them. But they’re pretty common during the winter in North What is the routing number for renasant bank hummingbirds love a generous supply of nectar, so you’ll mostly encounter them near willows and alders. They love perching there. 

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

  • Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris
  • Length: 3–4 in
  • Weight: 0.1–0.5 oz
  • Wingspan: 4–4.5 in

The adult Ruby-throated hummingbird is the most common hummingbird in North Carolina. It lives and breeds in the Eastern state, and its numbers are on the rise. 

The bird has a long, pointed bill. It also has green wings, underbelly, tail, and crown. The feathers are iridescent, too, so they look shiny under the sunlight.

The bird has a ruby-colored neck that appears bright against the green feathers, making the bird stand out among the crowd.

Although small, these birds fly with great power. Their wings move rapidly, and they’re among the few birds that are capable of flying backward.

Orange Birds in North Carolina

Carolina Wren

  • Scientific Name: Thryothorus ludovicianus
  • Length: 5–5.5 inches
  • Weight: 0.6–0.8 ounces
  • Wingspan: 10–11 inches

Carolina wrens have pale orange underbellies and beige-brown wings. Their entire body coloration leans towards orange, and they’re the most common wrens in North Carolina.

Carolina wrens are also among the most common backyard birds in the Eastern United States. They’re around the same size as an American goldfinch or a house finch, and they can fit in your backyard feeder just fine.

These birds spend most of their time around brushy yards and shrubby thickets. The males are best known for their call that sounds too loud for their small size.

American Robin

  • Scientific Name: Turdus migratorius
  • Length: 9.1–11.0 inches
  • Weight: 2.5–3 ounces
  • Wingspan: 12–16 inches

American Robins are one of the most abundant birds in North America and as common as Mcdonald’s franchises in the US. You’ve likely seen them a couple of times. 

They’re famous for their light gray wings and orange chests. Also, you can identify them by their sound. They make a cheerful, loud tone that bird watchers can hear from far away. 

American Robins are urban birds; they can comfortably live in cities and populated areas. But you may birds of eastern north carolina encounter them in the wild. 

To attract Robins to your backyard, put some fruit seeds, peanuts, and black oil sunflower seeds in your feeder.

Eastern Towhee

  • Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus
  • Length: 7–9.1 inches
  • Weight: 1.1–2 ounces
  • Wingspan: 8–11.8 inches

The Eastern towhee has an incredibly attractive coloration. This small-sized bird has black wings, a black head cap, and a long black tail with orange sides, and a white underbelly. 

These birds look like sparrows, and they’re about the same size as well, but they’re a bit less bulky. They’re larger than hummingbirds but smaller than red-winged blackbirds.

The Eastern towhee females are more brown than orange, and their coloration is paler overall.

You can find these birds around woodland hedges, brushy areas, and residential gardens. During the hot months, this migratory bird species moves to Canada.

Towhees feed on many kinds of insects, seeds, and fruits. They may pay a visit to your hopper feeder, but they generally prefer platform feeders because they’re large enough to accommodate their size.

Baltimore Oriole

  • Scientific Name: Icterus galbula
  • Length: 6.6–7.5 inches
  • Weight: 1–1.4 ounces
  • Wingspan: 9–11.8 inches

A bird with an entire Baseball team named after it must be one of a kind, right? Well, the Baltimore Orioles are definitely not here to disappoint!

You can easily distinguish the Baltimore orioles’ gender because the males have lively orange bodies with black backs and heads. Meanwhile, the females are more on the pale side with duller colors; black is just not in their dictionary. 

If you want to encounter these lovely orange birds, you should set your scope near open woodlands and forests. They spend most of their time there.

Yellow Birds in North Carolina

American Goldfinch

  • Scientific Name: Spinus tristis
  • Length: 4.3–5.5 inches
  • Weight: 0.39–0.71 ounces
  • Wingspan: 7.5–8.7 inches

American goldfinches are most famous for their appearances; these attractive birds have a vibrant yellow body and black forehead. Although you may notice that the males are more on the bright side nevertheless, you’ll find the yellow body color in both genders. 

These colorful birds have unique flying movements; they bounce up and down with spread wings, making for an exquisite appearance. You may also be lucky to see them showing off some flapping moves. 

To attract American goldfinches, lay some seeds and thistles out for them. Look in weedy areas and clearings if you want to go the extra mile and find them yourself. 

Tyrant Flycatcher

  • Scientific Name: Spiza americana
  • Length: 2.6–2.8 inches
  • Weight: 1–1.5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 5–5.9 inches

Tyrant flycatchers are among the passerine bird family. The passerine family is the largest group of bird species on Earth, including more than 400 species. 

The tyrant flycatchers are among the smallest species in the family. They’re common across North and South America, and they look strikingly similar to Old World flycatchers. However, they have more substantial bills, and their bodies are overall bulkier.

These birds aren’t vocal like other songbirds. You’ll seldom hear their call, and it’ll sound plain if you do.

Flycatchers feed on insects, as their name implies. They’re not present in North Carolina year-round, but they have been recorded more often than more rare birds.

Dickcissel

  • Scientific Name: Spiza americana
  • Length: 5.5–6.3 inches
  • Weight: 0.9–1.4 ounces
  • Wingspan: 9.8–10.2 inches

The Dickcissels, named after the sound they make, are erratic breeders that are worth looking for.

Unlike many other birds on the list, Dickcissels may be a little hard to identify because their appearance is pretty common. 

Don’t lose hope, though, because males can be identified by their chest area; it looks somewhat like two Vs. The upper one is black, and the lower one is yellow. They also have white bellies.

To catch them, you should go to grassland areas, hayfields, pastures, and prairies. You’ll most probably find them all year round.

Other Birds To Watch For in North Carolina

Mourning Dove

  • Scientific Name: Zenaida macroura
  • Length: 11–12 inches
  • Weight: 4–6 ounces
  • Wingspan: 17–17.7 inches

Mourning doves are familiar backyard visitors in most of the states, North Carolina included.

They have a beautiful tan and white plumage and black spots scattered across their wings. Male and female birds have similar body shapes. You’ll mostly see them perching on telephone lines or foraging near the ground.

If you have a platform feeder, you can expect to see this abundant bird species near it. They only feed on those because they prefer to stay in open spaces. They likely won’t appear at smaller feeders.

Carolina Chickadee

  • Scientific Name: Poecile carolinensis
  • Length: 3.9–4.7 inches
  • Weight: 0.3–0.5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 6–7.9 inches

Carolina chickadees are the most common chickadees in North Carolina. The family is most common across all states, but Carolinas, in particular, are abundant in the South-Eastern part of the country.

If you have a backyard bird feeder, you’ll undoubtedly see a couple of Carolinas all year round. They’re about the same size as an American goldfinch and have round bodies and long tails.

Other than near backyard feeders, you can find Carolina chickadees near deciduous forests at low elevations, as well as near residential areas and water bodies.

Purple Gallinule

  • Scientific Name: Porphyrio martinicus
  • Length: 10–15 inches
  • Weight: 5–10.8 ounces
  • Wingspan: 20–24 inches

Purple gallinules are rare in North Carolina, but there have been some recorded sightings. You’d be lucky to run across one of them because these birds are magnificent.

They have green wings, purple bluish fronts, and bright red beaks with a yellow tip. These birds walk like chickens, and they have similar long talons. However, they look more like ducks.

They’re members of the rail family, and they’re commonly known as swamp hens.

You can find purple gallinules in marshes. You may be surprised to see them floating or walking on lily pads, but their long talons help them cross the water easily.

European Starling

  • Scientific Name: Sturnus vulgaris
  • Length: 8–9 inches
  • Weight: 2–3.5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 12–16 inches

European starlings are one of the most visually appealing bird species you can encounter in your life. Their beautiful appearance can be attributed to their shimmering feathers that hold a unique color mix of dark blue and purple. 

If you’re lucky enough, you’ll catch them in the light because you’ll be able to see their magical appearance vividly then.

You can find European starlings abundantly in fields, city streets, and parks. Ironically, they’re more commonly spotted on the ground than in the sky because they look for insects to feed on in the soil. 

Wrap Up

As you can see, there are birds of all colors in North Carolina. There’s a huge variety, so you’ll undoubtedly get lucky and run across at least 5–10 of these species of birds. 

You can walk around marshes, wooded lands, and open fields to get lucky. There are also a lot of species that live and breed near mountainous areas with high elevations.

Get your binoculars ready, your hat on your head, and pack lots of water because you’ll need it for your bird-watching trip in the Old North state!

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Categories Birds By StateTags North CarolinaИсточник: https://www.wildbirdscoop.com/north-carolina-birds.html

And yet one more creature labeled "Carolinean" was one that we heard during twilight in pinelands, where BACHMAN'S SPARROWS sang and RED-COCKADED WOODPECKERS nested. The sound was lamb-like, a nasal "baaa", that came from the EASTERN NARROWMOUTH TOAD, Gastrophyrne carolinensis.  

But, phone number santander customer service birds, part of the reason why there's so much Carolinean in names is because there was so much early exploration and bird study that took place in the beginning days of what's now North & South Carolina.
And in the early 1700's, that was prior to the standardization, as we now know it, of common, and particularly scientific, names.

The renowned Swedish taxonomist, Carolus Linnaenus, had much to do with that standardizing, in a global sense. His major accomplishment, the publication of his "Systema Naturae" was in 1758. In it, for example, a common bird of the Carolinas, the MOCKINGBIRD, was described. Others were later. For example, it was in 1766 that Linnaenus described the CATBIRD as Dumetella carolinensis.

Much about the early Carolinean avifauna was included in the work published in 1731 by Mark Catesby, entitled the "A Natural History of the Carolinas, Florida, & the Bahamas". Volumes sold in England at 2 guineas each.

Catesby referred to the work by two men who, when in North Carolina, contributed much to early American ornithology, John White and John Lawson.

John White was the first to draw American birds extensively (he drew 32 species). His work was in a book by John Lawson entitled "A New Voyage to Carolina", published in 1709.
White actually made 4 voyages to the New World. On the second, in 1587, he went as the governor of 150 settlers at Sir Walter Raleigh's colony on Roanoke Island, North Carolina.
(We stay one overnight on that island during our North Carolina birds of eastern north carolina John White was on Roanoke Island, his daughter and her husband, were parents to the first English child born in America, Virginia Dare. Thereafter, John White had to leave Roanoke Island to go to England. When he returned to Roanoke Island in 1590, he found little trace of the colony and none of the colonists who stayed when he left.
A listing of the 32 bird species drawn by John White follows this narrative. 

John Lawson, the author of the book "A New Voyage to Carolina" in 1709, was, prior to that, a co-founder of North Carolina's oldest town, a place named Bath. His book was the first major attempt at a natural history in the New World. It became popular in Europe because of its vivid descriptions of the North American Indians and their customs, but in it also were good descriptions of newly-found birds and animals. Over 100 species of birds were noted in the book, and a listing of them (with names given by Lawson) follows this narrative.  

In 1711, Lawson was in a party exploring, in North Carolina, the Neuse River, determining how far inland it was navigable. During that venture, he was killed by Indians.
(During our NC tours, some of our best birding online fifth third in the upper Neuse River Valley, particularly at a wonderful reserve called Howell Woods.)

The feeders at Howell are a wonderful place to nicely see some attractive birds indeed. Those feeders there are somehow without Grackles, Starlings, and the like. 
Rather, there are (and were for us during our most-recent tour ) RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS (& 2 other woodpecker species), EASTERN BLUEBIRDS (called BLEW BIRDS in the days of White, Lawson, and Catesby), along with BROWN-HEADED Birds of eastern north carolina (and the WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, remember,Sitta carolinensis).  
Bright and colorful AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES and CARDINALS were there in numbers, as a male SUMMER TANAGER was not far away (called the "SUMMER RED-BIRD" by Catesby).  
Added to the avian mix were CHIPPING SPARROWS and BROWN THRASHER. 
A NORTHERN BOBWHITE walked through the feeder area. 
Nearby, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS were nesting in a tree-hole. 
Maybe a dozen RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS were coming to the feeders, with the brilliant gorget of the male, up close, just dazzling.
It was a nice place to sit in the shade and simply enjoy the birds.

The assortment of habitats throughout the Howell property contains a large number of birds to be enjoyed. At the edges of the woods, there were both BLUE GROSBEAKS and INDIGO BUNTINGS. In the woods, there are numerous WARBLERS (about a dozen species breed) including PROTHONOTARY, HOODED, KENTUCKY, and SWAINSON'S.

But it was a bird most apt to be seen in the sky that we seek and usually see at the Howell property, the MISSISSIPPI KITE. It's a raptor that when it's aerial it can be acrobatic catching insects, particularly dragonflies. This area of the upper Neuse valley has been good for us for the MISSISSIPPI KITE over the years.

(In 2004, by the way, north of North Carolina, MISSISSIPPI KITES caused enjoyment for a number of birders in places such as Maryland and New Jersey. Probably due to the 17-year CICADA.)

During our tour in North Carolina that year, in '04, we did not encountered any 17-year CICADAS (when they were locally common to the north). But we did see at Howell, in addition to the KITES (which nest there), a large number of various DRAGONFLIES (see the list that follows this narrative).

An aside for a moment regarding the name MISSISSIPPI KITE it's really not as common in Mississippi as it is other places. It's most common, during the North American summer, in the Central US, in Oklahoma for example. During the Southern American summer, that's where it is.
Some other birds with common names relating to a place where the bird is not as common as it is elsewhere include the CONNECTICUT WARBLER and PHILADELPHIA VIREO.

Some of the "nice birds" that we've seen, over the years, during our North Carolina tours, seem to be getting less common.

That's the case with one of our best birds, the RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER. According to Birdlife International, this bird of the pines (LONGLEAF, SHORTLEAF, SLASH, and LOBLOLLY), declined overall during the decade 1980-90 by about 25 per cent. It is now limited to about 30 isolated populations, with the most in South Carolina and Florida. About 50 percent are now in just 6 of those populations.

North Carolina is now the north edge of the RED-COCKADED'S range. We saw the species in an area where it has traditionally nested, in the Croatan Forest. But it was only one pair, that we encountered during our most recent tour - but at an active nest.
RED-COCKADED WOODPECKERS have nested as far north as Maryland in the 1960's (not many, a few were discovered there only in the 1930's). In the 1970's, RED-COCKADED nested in Virginia. Now, no longer, as they are not north of southern North Carolina.

Another bird, that we've enjoyed during our NC Tours, with a i ll be there for you that's been receding south, is the WILSON'S PLOVER.
The first specimen of the species was, in 1813, collected by Alexander Wilson, in southern New Jersey (at present-day Cape May). The WILSON'S PLOVER, until not that long ago, nested north of North Carolina, along citizens national bank waitsboro somerset ky beaches of the Delmarva Peninsula and New Jersey. It's occurrence now is as a rarity.

During North Carolina tours, a particularly enjoyable venture has been an afternoon boat-ride to an offshore barrier island, where no one lives, and where there are no roads. So, there are no houses and no cars. Only a pristine beach and dunes, by eastern US or Carolina standards, rather unaffected by people. We've walked the beach to the sandy area adjacent to one of the inlets where we've seen well as many as 8 WILSON'S PLOVERS.

One thinks, sometimes, about birds that appear to be (or actually are) declining.
The RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER and WILSON'S PLOVER have just been mentioned.
At another spot along the Carolina coast, we've seen the RED KNOT, a long-distance migrant in the Americas that's had a depreciable decline in recent years.
WHIP-POOR-WILLS and NIGHTHAWKS seem, on the basis of our previous experience, to be declining.
While RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS have been seen at a few places during our North Carolina tours (particularly where we were looking for the RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER), that species has declined (and even disappeared) from many places where it was  in the northeastern US.

Conversely, it comes to mind, that from a beach where we've watched SANDWICH and other TERNS feeding in the water, that the BROWN PELICAN is in greater numbers than it has been in the past. A few decades ago, the species was in trouble. No longer so, as its numbers have increased, and it's expanded north - that bird of the mid-Atlantic coast known as Pelecanus occidentalis carolinensis.

A Carolina bird-specialty of the pinewoods, formerly known as the "PINEWOODS SPARROW" seemed to continue in relatively stable numbers. That bird, most often known as the BACHMAN'S SPARROW, is named after a Carolinean (a South Carolinean) of the early 1800's.

The "Carolinean bird" with which we had the most contact during our evening and after-dark excursions was the CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW, Caprimulgus carolinensis. But our best encounter in the dark was when, as we were going along a remote dirt road, we heard in a roadside tree, a young owl. We stopped the vehicle, and within moments, there was an adult BARRED OWL, that also came on the scene. It was looking directly at us, with its big brown eyes, just a few feet away, in the shine of our headlights.

But a bird that we enjoyed as much as (if not more than) any other during the tour was one that would come out to sing up in a tree and atop a bush late in the afternoon, the PAINTED BUNTING. It reaches the northern limit of its breeding range along the southern North Carolina coast. What a nice bird, the adult male is to see, with bright blue, green, and red.
It was sound community bank mountlake terrace target to be seen for all of us, and we loved it!

Reading about the PAINTED BUNTING in the historical book noted earlier, written by Mark Catesby in 1731, we learn that to the south, the Spanish colonists called the bird the "MARIPOSA PINTADA", the "PAINTED BUTTERFLY".
In that book, we also read that back in those days, it ode to the west wind imagery commonly kept as a popular caged bird. A governor of South Carolina at that time kept 4 or 5 of the colorful songsters in cages.
In New Orleans, among the French inhabitants, the bird was also very popular as a cage-bird. During a visit there, Alexander Wilson wrote of it as being the most common of the birds kept in homes. A name given to it was 'NONPAREIL". Of course, the brilliant adult males were favored. It became known that it took over a year for the males to attain their colorful plumage.
During our tour, we saw a few males, some still dull, others bright.
It's nice to know that nowadays, the only way people enjoy the sight and sound of the PAINTED BUNTING is as we did, in the wild. (Native birds in the US can no longer be kept as caged birds.)

Referring to birds in the US, here's a trivia question of sorts:
Other than some very localized, sometimes recently "split" species (such as 2 of the Scrub-Jays, the Gunnison Sage-Grouse, Juniper Titmouse, the re-introduced California Condor, and the Yellow-billed Magpie, actually endemic to California):
What species are endemic to only the Lower 48 States?

There are not many: RED-COCKADED WOODPECKER, FISH CROW, CAROLINA CHICKADEE, BACHMAN'S SPARROW, BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE.

We saw all of these during our North Carolina tour. (This comes to mind as one year, one of our tour participants was a Canadian, and for him 3 of these species were "lifers" .)

And if you think that one might have been forgotten, the BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH also resides in the Bahamas.

Some of the best mammal experiences that we've had during our North Carolina tours have been sightings of Black Bears, the Red Wolf, Bobcat, and one time when we came upon a group of 8 River Otters, frolicking together in a pond.

Above, at the beginning of this narrative, there are listings of birds, as well as the other wildlife, that have been found cumulatively during the FONT North Carolina Tours since 1992. 
Among those birds is another that lastly should be mentioned here, the Wood Duck, that has first community credit union houston customer service number been known over the years by another name, the "Carolina Duck".



Источник: http://focusonnature.com/NorthCarolinaBirdEssay.htm

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North Carolina is home to many different species of wild birds, in this article we’ll take a look at some of the more recognizable and well-known birds found in the state. Some of these species live in North Carolina all year long, others are migratory and only part-time residents to the state. Below we’re going to take a look at 25 backyard birds in North Carolina, and learn a little about each species.

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After that I’ll show you how to attract them to your yard, give you a crash course in the 10 different types of bird feeders you can use to do so, and even mention a few birdwatching hotspots in North Carolina. 

How many different species of wild birds are in North Carolina?

It’s difficult to get an exact number on how many bird species are found in North America, the United States, or even in the state of North Carolina. However, according to Wikipedia there are at least 470 species of birds in the state of North Carolina.

As far as the number of species of birds in North America, source claims there are 2,059 species while another roslyn savings bank east meadow source says there are just 914. So I’m not sure how much I trust these numbers, but they give us an idea of the number of species in the continent.

With all that being said, for the purposes of this article we are just going to look at some of our favorite species found in North Carolina. 

25 backyard birds in North Carolina

Below we’ll look at 25 species of backyard birds in North Carolina, some are year-round residents and some aren’t. These obviously aren’t all the species in the state, or even close to it, but they are some of the more notable and recognizable North Carolina backyard birds. Without any further delay, let’s take a look!

1. Northern Cardinal

Scientific name: Cardinalis cardinalis
Length: 8.3-9.1 in
Weight: 1.5-1.7 oz
Wingspan: 9.8-12.2 in

Northern Cardinals are among the most recognizable and common backyard birds in North America. Males have bright red feathers and a black mask, females have duller colors and are more pale brown with some reddish coloring. Both males and females are easily recognized by their “mohawks” and reddish orange beaks. 

Northern Cardinals are found throughout the state of North Carolina year-round.  

Cardinals will visit most seed feeders, offer them mixed seed blends and black sunflower seeds.

You may also like: 21 interesting facts about Northern Cardinals


2. Tufted Titmouse

Scientific name: Baeolophus bicolor
Length: 5.5-6.3 bank of america mortgage appointment 0.6-0.9 oz
Wingspan: 7.9-10.2 in

These little birds are very common at feeders and in backyards within their range. Like Cardinals, they have a small mohawk that helps you tell them apart from other birds. Titmice are silver-gray on top and lighter on bottom, with a black patch just above their beaks. 

The Tufted Titmouse is found throughout the state of North Carolina all year. 

Titmice will visit most seed feeders, offer them mixed seed blends and black sunflower seeds.


3. Carolina Chickadee

Scientific name
Length
Weight
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Chickadees are tiny little birds that are very easy to recognize because of their “black cap” and black bib. Their cheeks are solid white, their wings and backs are blackish gray, and their underbodies are puffy and whitish.  

Carolina Chickadees, not to be confused with Black-capped Chickadees, are found throughout the state of North Carolina. They are very common at bird feeders and are often seen darting back and forth from a feeder to cover and back again for more. Chickadees are always among the first birds I see visiting a new feeder in my yard. 

Chickadees will visit most seed feeders, offer them mixed seed blends and banks that let you open a checking account for free sunflower seeds.


4. Blue Jay

blue jay at feeder

Scientific name: Cyanocitta cristata
Length: 9.8-11.8 in
Weight: 2.5-3.5 oz
Wingspan: 13.4-16.9 in

Another very well-known bird species in North America and the U.S. is the Blue Jay. They have a large blue crest on top of their heads with mostly blue feathers on top and white feathers on bottom. They also have birds of eastern north carolina black ring around their necks that looks like a necklace. Their wings are barred white, blue, and black. 

Blue Jays are another year-round resident to the entire state of North Carolina. They are common in backyards and at feeders.

Blue Jays like platform feeders, peanut feeders, and feeders with large perches. Offer them black sunflower seeds, mixed seeds, and peanuts. 


5. Eastern Bluebird

eastern bluebird

Scientific name: Sialia sialis
Length: 6.3-8.3 in
Weight: 1.0-1.1 oz
Wingspan: 9.8-12.6 in

True to their name, bluebirds are all blue on top with rusty reddish-orange bellies. They are just about the most sought after tenants of birdhouses in the U.S. making the bluebird house industry pretty booming. They are very common in backyards, though not so much at feeders. Put up a birdhouse and try your luck in attracting a mating pair. I was able to attract nesting bluebirds 2 years in a row with this birdhouse on Amazon. 

When it comes to NC, Eastern Bluebirds are found throughout the state of North Carolina all year. 

Bluebirds don’t typically eat seeds, but can be enticed to visit feeders with mealworms on a tray feeder bank of america sba loans in a dish. 


6. White-breasted Nuthatch

Scientific name: Sitta carolinensis
Length: 5.1-5.5 in
Weight: 0.6-1.1 oz
Wingspan: 7.9-10.6 in

White-breasted Nuthatches are very common feeder birds found in most backyards within their range. They get their name from the fact that they stuff nuts and seeds under tree bark, then use their sharp beaks to hatch them back out. I’ve noticed that they also have the ability to walk vertically on trees better than many other types of birds. They have a thick black stripe on top of their heads, with white on either side and on their bellies. Their wings are mostly gray and black. 

White-breasted Nuthatches are found year-round throughout North Carolina.

Nuthatches will visit most seed feeders, offer them mixed seed blends, black sunflower seeds, peanuts, or suet.


7. American Robin

Scientific name: Turdus migratorius
Length: 7.9-11.0 in
Weight: 2.7-3.0 oz
Wingspan: 12.2-15.8 in

Another one of the most common backyard birds in North Carolina is the American Robin. Robins are mostly seen hopping around the grass looking for worms and other invertebrates to eat. While they will occasionally visit bird feeders, they do not typically eat seeds. Their bright red, round bellies, and yellow beaks make them easy to identify. 

American robins are very common backyard birds pretty much everywhere in North America, including North Carolina.

American Robins do not often visit bird feeders, so attract them with meal worms, native fruit-bearing plants, or a bird bath. 


8. Mourning Dove

Scientific name: Zenaida macroura
Length: 9.1-13.4 in
Weight: 3.0-6.0 oz
Wingspan: 17.7 in

About the size of a robin, doves are very common in backyards and will often sit perched on telephone wires or in groups in trees. I sometimes see them on my tray feeder, but more often than not they are seen walking around on the ground. Mourning Doves are mostly gray with black spots on top and a pale peachy color below. 

Mourning Doves are found throughout North Carolina as well as the rest of the lower 48 states, Mexico, and areas of Central America. 

Doves will often visit seed feeders, but prefer scouring the ground for seeds that have fallen. Try a ground feeder with a mixed seed blend, or simply scatter some seeds on the ground.


9. European Starling

Scientific name: Sturnus vulgaris
Length: 7.9-9.1 in
Weight: 2.1-3.4 oz
Wingspan: 12.2-15.8 in

100 starlings were set loose in New York in the 1890s and they have since taken over the country. They destroy other birds’ nests, kill their young, and will overtake feeders not allowing other birds to get any of the food that you put out. They are mostly all dark with white specks on their backs and wings, and have yellow beaks and feet. Starlings can also be a purple and green iridescent color and in the right light can actually be quite pretty.

Unfortunately starlings are found in every one of the lower 48 states year-round, and are one of the most common backyard birds in North Carolina. 

European Starlings will eat almost anything. They are an invasive species so we suggest you do not attempt to attract them, they’ll show up anyway.


10. American Goldfinch

american goldfinch

Scientific name: Spinus tristis
Length: 4.3-5.1 in
Weight: 0.4-0.7 oz
Wingspan: 7.5-8.7 in

Goldfinches are among my favorite birds to see at feeders, especially when they have their bright yellow feathers in the Spring and Summer. During this period they are mostly yellow, or “gold”, with black-tipped wings and black cap on top of their heads. In the winter they will molt and lose these flashy colors and have more dull brownish or olive colors. You can always recognize them any time of year by the black on their wings, and their finch-like beaks. 

Goldfinches are found all year in the majority of North Carolina. 

Goldfinches prefer thistle feeders, they may also eat sunflower chips but a thistle feeder is your best chance to attract them. 


11. House Finch

Scientific name: Haemorhous mexicanus
Length: 5.1-5.5 in
Weight: 0.6-0.9 oz
Wingspan: 7.9-9.8 in

The House Finch is yet another very common backyard domino federal credit union atlanta tx in North Carolina. Though they are invasive to North Carolina, they are not universally hated like House Sparrows, and do not cause the problems that the sparrows do. If you attract them, which is fairly easy to do, they may show up in large flocks and mob your feeders. Males are mostly streaked brown in color with some red on the head and chest, females are all brown (female pictured above).

House Finches are common in many eastern states, North Carolina included.

Like other finches, House Finches often visit thistle feeders. They are seen at seed feeders more than Goldfinches, so try some black sunflower seeds to attract them as well.  


12. House Sparrow

Scientific name: Passer domesticus
Length: 5.9-6.7 in
Weight: 0.9-1.1 oz
Wingspan: 7.5-9.8 in

Generally look at as pests, Houses Sparrows are the only other species of wild birds in the U.S. besides starlings that you can legally trap and humanely kill. Like starlings, they were introduced in New York in the 1800s and have since spread across our country like wildfire. They are mostly brown in color, with some black and brown streaking on their wings and buffy chest. They are overall aggressive towards other birds, especially around nests. 

House Sparrows are permanent residents in North Carolina, the rest of the United States, Mexico, Central America, and much of Canada.

Like the European Starling, House Sparrows are invasive and pose a threat to native species. They will eat almost anything. 


13. Red-winged Blackbird

Scientific name: Agelaius phoeniceus
Length: 6.7-9.1 in
Weight: 1.1-2.7 oz
Wingspan: 12.2-15.8 in

Among the most abundant birds in all of North America, male Red-winged Blackbirds are unmistakable because of their red wings. The females of this species however, look quite different and are mostly brown with some yellow highlights. They are known as a polygynous species, meaning males will have up to 15 different females that they are mating with. 

Red-winged Blackbirds are common in North Carolina all year.

Red-winged Blackbirds visit most types of feeders and will eat seed as well as suet.


14. American Crow

Scientific name: Corvus brachyrhynchos
Length: 15.8-20.9 in
Weight: 11.2-21.9 oz
Wingspan: 33.5-39.4 in

American Crows are solid black in color, and quite large in size. They are also know for being highly intelligent problem solvers, like their cousin the Raven. Crows will roost higher up in the tree tops in large groups where they can get a birds eye view of everything below. If an owl or a hawk shows up, the roost will call out and let everyone known that there is danger nearby. I recently saw 3 crows and a red-shouldered hawk team up to chase off a great-horned owl, it was cool to watch. 

Crows are found throughout the entire state of North Carolina all year long. 

American Crows are omnivorous and generally do not visit bird feeders, they are much too large. 


15. Song Sparrow

Scientific name: Melospiza melodia
Length: 4.7-6.7 in
Weight: 0.4-1.9 oz
Wingspan: 7.1-9.4 in

These sparrows are mostly brown on the back and wings, with heavy brown streaks on a white breast.  Song Sparrows are very common throughout most of North America and their plumage can vary a bit from region to region. The male of the species uses his song to attract females as well as to defend his territory. 

Song Sparrows are common throughout NC but are typically permanent residents in western North Carolina, and winter residents only in eastern parts of the state. 

Song Sparrows will sometimes visit bird feeders and snack on mixed seeds and sunflower seeds. 


16. Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific name: Melanerpes carolinus
Length: 9.4 in
Weight: 2.0-3.2 oz
Wingspan: 13.0-16.5 in

These medium-sized woodpeckers are fairly common at feeders and in backyards in general. Though they are described as “red-bellied” you may first notice the bright red streak along the back of their heads. They have a plain white break with an area of pinkish red lower down in their “belly” area which is often not visible. Their wings are what really makes them easy to identify though, with the white and black barring.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are permanent residents in North Carolina.

Attract Red-bellied Woodpeckers with a suet feeder, though they will also sometimes eat at seed feeders. 


17. Downy Woodpecker

Scientific name: Picoides pubescens
Length: 5.5-6.7 in
Weight: 0.7-1.0 oz
Wingspan: 9.8-11.8 in

Downy’s are very common backyard birds that love to visit bird feeders. They are the smallest woodpeckers in North America and are always one of the first species I see at a new bird feeder. They are easily identifiable by their all white underbodies, black wings with white spots, black and white striped heads, and the red spot on the back of their heads (in males, females have no red). Though they do closely resemble another bird on this list, the Hairy Woodpecker, Downy’s are smaller. 

Downy Woodpeckers are found all year throughout the whole state of North Carolina. 

Downy Woodpeckers are very common at most types of bird feeders. Offer them mixed seed, black sunflower seed, and suet. 


18. Common Grackle

Scientific name: Quiscalus quiscula
Length: 11.0-13.4 in
Weight: 2.6-5.0 oz
Wingspan: 14.2-18.1 in

Though they fall into the bully bird category like the starling does, Grackles are also quite pretty in the right light with their iridescent feathers. Overall they appear mostly black como eliminar t mobile my account color and will roost with other types of blackbirds, sometimes in massive flocks numbering in the millions of birds. They are easy to identify by their solid coloring and yellow ringed eye.

Grackles are common in North Carolina and found throughout the state. 

Grackles are foragers and will eat just about anything, they are often thought of as pests. 


19. Hairy Woodpecker

Scientific name: Leuconotopicus villosus
Length: 7.1-10.2 in
Weight: 1.4-3.4 oz
Wingspan: 13.0-16.1 in

There’s not much to differentiate Hairy Woodpeckers from Downy Woodpeckers, aside from the Hairy’s larger size and a few other key features. They both have very similar markings and are almost always found in the same places capital one online bill pay service the country as each other. I have found though that the Hairy Woodpecker does not visit bird feeder near as often as Downy’s do. 

Hairy Woodpeckers are found throughout the state of North Carolina all year.

While not as common as Downy Woodpeckers, Hairy Woodpeckers will visit suet and seed feeders. 


20. Golden-crowned Kinglet

Scientific name
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These little birds can be difficult to spot because of their size, but are very cute. They’re often found in shrubs and deciduous trees. Golden-crowned kinglets are tiny migratory birds that can be seen throughout North Carolina and most of the lower 48 states in the non-breeding season, so look for them in the winter. They’re easily identified by their small size and “golden crown” on the top of their head. Golden-crowned kinglets are one of the smallest backyard birds in North Carolina, aside from hummingbirds.

Kinglets rarely visit feeders, but you may still spot one in your backyard when they’re in town.


21. Baltimore Oriole

baltimore oriole

Scientific name: Icterus galbula
Length: 6.7-7.5 in
Weight: 1.1-1.4 oz
Wingspan: 9.1-11.8 in

Orioles are fruit eating birds and like dark colored berries and fruits. If your backyard has native fruit-bearing trees and plants you have a good chance of attracting Baltimore Orioles. Males have a dark hood on their entire head, black backs with white stripes on their wings, and they are totally orange on their breasts and underbodies. They also have an orange rump and some orange tail feathers. Females coloring is a much more muted yellowish-orange.

Baltimore Orioles are migratory birds that only show up during the breeding season in most of the country, including North Carolina. So look for them in the Spring and early Summer mainly in the western half of the state. 

Orioles love sweet things, put out an oriole feeder and offer them jelly and orange halves to attract them when they’re in town. 


22. Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific name: Archilochus colubris
Length: 2.8-3.5 in
Weight: 0.1-0.2 oz
Wingspan: 3.1-4.3 in

Though only common in the eastern half of the United States, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are the most abundant species of hummingbirds in the country. They are also the only breeding species of hummingbird found in the Eastern U.S. They get their name because males have a bright ruby-red throat. Ruby-throated Hummers are emerald-green on their backs, wings, and heads with white under-parts. Females lack the red throat feathers.

You might find a couple of rare wandering species www anastasiabeverlyhills com usa time to time, but Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are generally the main hummingbirds found in North Carolina. They are found throughout the state from Spring to Fall and are the smallest backyard birds in North Carolina.

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are very common in backyards if you put out nectar feeders, in most cases this should be done in April or May. 

You may like:Facts, Myths, and FAQ about hummingbirds


23. Brown Thrasher

Scientific name:
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Weight:
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Food:

These backyards birds in North Carolina aren’t as well-known as others on this list, but they can be found if you know where to look. As the name suggests they are mostly brown in color and I assume they are called thrashers because of the way they will thrash through fallen leaves looking for bugs, don’t quote me on that though. Brown Thrashers are accomplished songbirds and are believed to have over 1100 different songs, including those of other bird species. 

Brown Thrashers are found throughout the state and are some of the more musical backyard birds in North Carolina. 

Brown Thrashers don’t usually visit bird feeders but may pick up seeds on the ground. They mainly dig through leaves and sticks looking for bugs to find their food. 


24. Gray Catbird

Scientific name: Dumetella carolinensis
Length: 8.3-9.4 in
Weight: 0.8-2.0 oz
Wingspan: 8.7-11.8 in

Most Catbirds are dark slate gray, with black caps on top of their heads, blackish gray wings, and long tails. They are mostly fruit eating birds so attract them with native fruit-bearing trees and bushes. They get the name catbird from their calls that somewhat resemble that of a meowing cat.  

Gray Catbirds are found in most of North Carolina in the breeding season only, however there are permanent residents near the coast. 

You may be able to attract catbirds if you offer some fruits, berries, and other sweet things but they prefer to forage on the ground or in bushes for food. 


25. Northern Flicker

northern flicker

Scientific name: Colaptes auratus
Length: 11.0-12.2 in
Weight: 3.9-5.6 oz
Wingspan: 16.5-20.1 in

These medium to large sized woodpeckers are quite common in backyards throughout the United States, though not extremely common at feeders. In my opinion they are also among some of the most cox login pay bill birds in North America. Flickers feed mainly on insects and are slightly less common at feeders as the other woodpecker species on this list, but if you know where to look you will still spot them in your backyard. Identify them by their black spots on their bellies, solid black bib, red patch on the back of their necks, and barred black and gray wings. 

Northern Flickers are common all year in the state of North Carolina.

Northern Flickers occasionally visit a suet feeder, but more often than not they find their own food. They will however visit a bird bath if you have one out. 


How to attract birds to your yard

Interested in attracting some of these birds to your backyard? Take a look at these 5 simple tips, starting with the most obvious.

1. Put out bird feeders

The best and most obvious way to attract birds to your yard is to put out a bird feeder or two. I suggest starting with a simple tube feeder, hopper feeder, platform feeder, or a window feeder. See below for suggestions for each. 

2. Add a water source

A pedestal birdbath like this one on Amazon is great, but you can also use something as simple as a terra cotta flower pot saucer, like this one. Birds need water not only to bathe in but also to drink and adding a water feature to your yard will only increase your chances of attracting birds. Also consider adding a solar fountain since moving water will entice the birds to visit the water even more. 

3. Offer birdhouses

Many species of birds will readily take up residence in birdhouses if put out in the right spot at the right time of year. Eastern Bluebirds are among the most common sought after birds to attract to birdhouses. I have this birdhouse in my backyard and a mating pair of bluebirds were checking it out the same day I installed it.  

4. Provide shelter

Make sure that your yard has trees, bushes, and shrubs that the birds can dart back and forth to when they sense danger. This is their main defense from predators. If your yard is perhaps in a new subdivision with no mature trees then do your best to add some landscaping features that will allow birds to look at your yard as safe.

5. Add native plants

For many birds that eat nuts, berries, and seeds, having native plants that produce these things will only aide your efforts to attract more birds. Try to avoid invasive and non-native plants as they can be harmful to native birds who are not used to these https dressbarn capitalone com login species. 


10 different types of bird feeders

Here are 10 of the most common bird feeders people set up in their yards. 

  1. Hopper feeder tickets at work volcano bay Hopper feeders get their name because they have a compartment in the middle, the hopper, that holds the bird seed. There are perches on the sides for birds to land on and eat from. Many hopper feeders are in the shape of a house and are covered on top to keep the seed dry. Use black sunflower what is the routing number for renasant bank or mixed birdseed for this type of feeder. Here’s one of my favorite hopper feeders, it’s squirrel-proof too. 
  2. Platform feeder – Sometimes called tray feeders, platform feeders are open on top and can usually be hung from a tree or hook, or pole-mounted. They are great for feeding most types of birds and are easy to get set up. Though since they are completely open, every animal in your yard that can reach them will eat from them. Use black sunflower seeds or mixed birdseed for this type of feeder. I’m using this platform feeder in my backyard right now. 
  3. Tube feeder – Tube feeders are nothing more than clear plastic tube-shaped bird feeders. They can range in size from holding a few cups of seed to holding 5 lbs or more. They are great because they keep your seed fresh and dry while also allowing you to easily seed when it needs to be refilled. Many birds of eastern north carolina of birds will use a tube feeder. You can use black sunflower seeds and mixed seeds in tube feeders. Squirrel Buster makes some of the best tube feeders on the market, this one is great and is of course squirrel proof. 
  4. Suet feeder – Suet feeders are for one type of bird food, first national bank online columbus ne cakes. They are a very simple concept, usually made of nothing more than a metal wire cage, sometimes with a tail-prop coming down for larger birds. Suet feeders are popular in the winter time when birds are looking for high-fat foods and are frequently visited by woodpeckers. I suggest getting a suet feeder with a long tail prop so you can attract larger woodpeckers, like the Pileated and Northern Flicker. 
  5. Window feeder – Window feeders are small bird feeders that typically mount right onto a glass window by means of suction cups. They are similar to tray feeders in that they are open on top and you just pour the seed into the tray area to refill them. These feeders are popular with many different types of birds, are super easy to get started with, and great for people who don’t have big yards. Use black sunflower seeds or mixed birdseed for this type of feeder. This is by far the most popular window feeder on Amazon, and maybe the most popular bird feeder on Amazon overall. 
  6. Thistle feeder – Thistle feeders, aka Nyjer feeders, are specialized bird feeders made especially for thistle seed. The main types of birds that thistle feeders attract are birds in the finch family, which includes the American Goldfinch and House Finch whom are both on this list. Thistle feeders are often in a tube shape and have tiny holes all along the sides of the tube allowing the birds to pick out the thistle. Here’s a good thistle feeder from Droll Yankees. 
  7. Ground feeder – Ground feeders are more or less tray feeders that sit on ground level. They will be very popular with birds like Mourning Doves and Juncos as well as squirrels, raccoons, and any other type of ground animal. Use black sunflower seeds or mixed birdseed for this type of feeder. You might like this ground feeder made from recycled plastic. 
  8. Oriole feeder – Oriole feeders are another type of specialty banks that have free checking accounts for pretty much one type of bird, orioles. The feeder itself is often orange in color and usually has little plastic or glass dishes made for holding jelly, which orioles love. They also allow you to stick orange halves onto the feeder, another food that orioles relish. Here’s a simple oriole feeder with 4 jelly trays that holds for orange halves. 
  9. Hummingbird feeder – Nectar feeders, aka hummingbird feeders, are designed specifically for hummingbirds to extract sugar water. Even though they are designed for hummingbirds, I frequently see Downy Woodpeckers at mine who also loves that sweet nectar. See this article flagstar bank online sign up learn how to make hummingbird nectar without boiling the water. Hummingbird feeders are simple and inexpensive so there’s no need to spend much on one, here’s one that I’ve personally used and had success with. 
  10. Peanut feeder – Similar to thistle feeders, peanut feeders are tube-shaped and usually composed of a metal wire mesh material. Only the holes in the wire mesh are much further apart to allow for either whole unshelled or shelled peanuts to pass through the holes. These feeders attract birds like Blue Jays and as the name suggests, should be filled with peanuts. If you want to keep squirrels out of can you pay car bill with credit card peanut feeder, then this one by Squirrel Buster is your best bet. Otherwise this simple one will do the trick. 

Bird watching in North Carolina

North Carolina is a wonderful state for birding if you want to go take your citizens community bank rexburg idaho outside of your own backyard. The North Carolina Audubon Society has 12 chapters and is always having meetups, workshops, field trips, and birding tours, should you want to get a little more involved. Or you can stick to your home base and just watch backyard birds in North Carolina. Either way is fine.

North Carolina birding locations, hotspots, and resources

I am not a resident of NC, however I do live in a neighboring state and have been to some of these places. If you are a North Carolina resident and would like to add some new species to your life list, then take a look at this list I’ve compiled of some popular birding locations and resources in North Carolina.

You can learn more about several of these locations from here. 

Categories Bird Watching
About Jesse

Jesse enjoys bird watching and feeding birds in his backyard, learning about the different species, and sharing his knowledge and experiences.

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