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The Strategy sets bold targets for ending the HIV epidemic in the United States by 2030, including a 75% reduction in new HIV infections by 2025 and a 90%. Sandbach United 1st Team. Welcome to the Sandbach United 1st Team page. Honours: 2019-20 NWCFL First Division Challenge Cup Winners. the first documented case in the United States. The lab run by Dr. Charles Chiu, an infectious disease specialist at UC San Francisco.

United 1st -

United Airlines vs. Delta First Class: Which Is Better?

You’re planning a transatlantic flight to Paris. The thought of being crammed into an economy seat for eight hours only to face a rubbery egg served inside a half-frozen English muffin makes you cringe.

This time, you’re splurging on first class. You keep frequent flier accounts with both United (UAL) and Delta (DAL) and are not sure which airline to choose. Before you leave the decision up to a coin toss, remember that when it comes to the perks and services provided in first class, airlines can vary wildly—both in quantity and quality.

Key Takeaways

  • Both Delta and United airlines offer plenty of perks and amenities to first-class passengers, including advance boarding, two free checked bags, and complimentary drinks before takeoff.
  • Both airlines offer state-of-the-art entertainment options.
  • Both airlines offer chef-curated meals and sommelier-picked wines, but United has teamed with the prestigious Trotter Project toques to design its menus.
  • Delta ranks higher than United overall in The Wall Street Journal's well-regarded annual airline scorecard and is more reliable—and slightly more post—overall.

Who Has the Better Stats?

Every year, The Wall Street Journal’s The Middle Seat column publishes a scorecard that ranks airlines in seven areas of service and one overall category. In 2020, Delta scored better than United in all seven, including on-time arrivals, baggage handling, and customer complaints, as well as in the overall service category (Delta ranked second overall; United, seventh (tied with JetBlue).

Regardless of whether you’re flying first-class or economy, you don’t want your bags to wind up in Akron when they’re supposed to meet you in Amsterdam. It might be wise to base your choice on basic operational stats rather than what kind of beer they serve in the first-class lounges, and in that case, Delta is likely a safer bet. 

The Drill

Here’s what you can expect when flying first class with Delta. You’ll be first to board the plane and served complimentary drinks before takeoff. Expect free entertainment; generous snacks (short flights), meals (longer flights), and drinks throughout the flight; reserved overhead luggage space, Wi-Fi, and outlets to plug in your cell phone. Keep in mind that Delta’s top class, Delta One (formerly BusinessElite), is only available on long-haul international and select long-haul (usually, transcontinental) domestic flights.

On United, you can also expect similar privileged boarding policies and generous availability of refreshments. For in-flight entertainment, the airline features DirecTV offerings (on select flights) The Private Screening system lets you play games or view shows and movies from a seat monitor or your own device.

If legroom is your number one priority, you can rest assured: Both airlines feature comparable seats with equal amounts of sprawl. Ditto with checked luggage: Both Delta and United allow you to check two free bags to most destinations, with expedited delivery of them at Baggage Claim.

Wine and Dine

Beer aficionados can sip on premium brews on some domestic Delta flights. On flights of 900 miles or more, expect dinner service to feature items such as grilled chicken with risotto or spinach ricotta ravioli. Frequent fliers rave about the omelets served in first class with a side of roasted sweet potatoes (or regular potatoes, if you prefer). On Delta One flights, the meals are chef-driven, with the airlines teaming with local toques to design the menu. The fancy wine pairings are selected by Delta’s master sommelier, Andrea Robinson, a James Beard Award winner.

United’s international-quality, multi-course meals come with three entree choices. Menus are designed in collaboration with The Trotter Project, an educational nonprofit named after legendary chef Charlie Trotter. United works with Trotter Project chefs to design menus and sponsors Trotter Project events and charities.

The Bottom Line

Overall, Delta is consistently rated the more reliable airline. And when it comes to first-class flying, Delta’s amenities possess a posh factor that United doesn't quite match, though it comes close.

However, in many ways, the choice is a toss-up. Both airlines have added previously unheard-of perks to attract first-class customers. Check the fine print, however: Many extras require not only a first-class ticket but also elite levels of frequent flier miles. 

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/managing-wealth/050316/united-airlines-vs-delta-first-class-which-better.asp

National HIV/AIDS Strategy (2022-2025)

National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States, 2022-2025

National HIV/AIDS Strategy

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (2022–2025) provides stakeholders across the nation with a roadmap to accelerate efforts to end the HIV epidemic in the United States by 2030. The Strategy reflects President Biden’s commitment to re-energize and strengthen a whole-of-society response to the epidemic while supporting people with HIV and reducing HIV-associated morbidity and mortality.

The White House’s Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP), part of the Domestic Policy Council, facilitated development of and published the Strategy, which builds on the 2021 HIV National Strategic Plan and the two prior National HIV/AIDS Strategies (2010, 2015). (Read about the prior National Strategic Plan and Strategies.)

Vision and Goals

The Strategy articulates a clear vision to guide the nation’s response to HIV:

The United States will be a place where new HIV infections are prevented, every person knows their status, and every person with HIV has high-quality care and treatment, lives free from stigma and discrimination, and can achieve their full potential for health and well-being across the lifespan.

This vision includes all people, regardless of age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, disability, geographic location, or socioeconomic circumstance.

The Strategy sets bold targets for ending the HIV epidemic in the United States by 2030, including a 75% reduction in new HIV infections by 2025 and a 90% reduction by 2030. To guide the nation toward realizing the vision, the Strategy focuses on four goals:

  • Prevent new HIV infections.
  • Improve HIV-related health outcomes of people with HIV.
  • Reduce HIV-related disparities and health inequities.
  • Achieve integrated, coordinated efforts that address the HIV epidemic among all partners and stakeholders.

Objectives, Strategies, and Priority Populations

National HIV/AIDS Strategy - What You Need to Know

For stakeholders across the nation, the National HIV/AIDS Strategy:

  • Details 21 objectives and 78 strategies for federal and nonfederal stakeholders to implement to achieve the goals.
  • Designates five priority populations disproportionately impacted by HIV so that federal agencies and other stakeholders can focus efforts and resources to achieve the greatest impact.
  • Identifies nine core indicators to monitor national progress, establishes a disparity indicator stratified by the priority populations to measure progress toward reducing significant HIV-related disparities, and identifies the topic of a new indicator to be developed.

Development Process

ONAP developed the updated Strategy in the latter half of 2021, informed by significant input from community stakeholders, including people living with HIV, and supported by federal partners from nine federal Departments whose programs, policies, services, or activities contribute to our national response to HIV. The Strategy builds on the progress achieved and lessons learned from the prior national strategies and seeks to leverage new tools and opportunities to address the challenges that remain.

Implementing the Strategy

ONAP will work with federal partners in early 2022 to produce a Federal Implementation Plan that documents specific actions that federal departments and agencies will take to achieve the Strategy’s goals and objectives. Progress toward meeting the Strategy’s goals will be monitored and reported annually.

But federal activity alone can’t end the HIV epidemic. That is why the Strategy is a national one, not just a federal one. The Strategy is a call to action for stakeholders from all sectors of society. Achieving its goals will require the engagement of stakeholders from all sectors of society in a more coordinated, re-energized national response to HIV. This includes the collaborative efforts of people with or at risk for HIV; public health professionals; health care providers; people working in state, tribal, and local government; staff of faith- and community-based organizations; educators; researchers; and people leading and working in private industry. 

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy and the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. Initiative

The Strategy and the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. (EHE) initiative are closely aligned and complementary. They have the common goal of reducing new HIV transmissions in the United States by 75% by 2025 and by 90% by 2030. The Strategy is the broader, overarching national plan that extends across many federal departments and encompasses the entire nation. The EHE initiative will be a leading component of the work by the Department of Health and Human Services – in collaboration with state, tribal, territorial, and local partners – to implement the Strategy.

Источник: https://www.hiv.gov/federal-response/national-hiv-aids-strategy/national-hiv-aids-strategy-2021-2025
XML Vote Summary 

Question: (Motion to Discharge: Rachael S. Rollins to be U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts from the Committee on the Judiciary )

Vote Number: 475

Vote Date: December 2, 2021, 05:01 PM

Required For Majority: 1/2

Vote Result: Motion to Discharge Agreed to

Nomination Number: PN930

Nomination Description: Rachael S. Rollins, of Massachusetts, to be United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts for the term of four years

Vote Counts:

YEAs50

NAYs

47

Not Voting

3

*Information compiled through Senate LIS by the Senate bill clerk under the direction of the secretary of the Senate

Alphabetical by Senator Name 

Baldwin (D-WI), Yea
Barrasso (R-WY), Not Voting
Bennet (D-CO), Yea
Blackburn (R-TN), Nay
Blumenthal (D-CT), Yea
Blunt (R-MO), Nay
Booker (D-NJ), Yea
Boozman (R-AR), Nay
Braun (R-IN), Nay
Brown (D-OH), Yea
Burr (R-NC), Nay
Cantwell (D-WA), Yea
Capito (R-WV), Nay
Cardin (D-MD), Yea
Carper (D-DE), Yea
Casey (D-PA), Yea
Cassidy (R-LA), Nay
Collins (R-ME), Nay
Coons (D-DE), Yea
Cornyn (R-TX), Nay
Cortez Masto (D-NV), Yea
Cotton (R-AR), Nay
Cramer (R-ND), Nay
Crapo (R-ID), Nay
Cruz (R-TX), Nay
Daines (R-MT), Nay
Duckworth (D-IL), Yea
Durbin (D-IL), Yea
Ernst (R-IA), Nay
Feinstein (D-CA), Yea
Fischer (R-NE), Nay
Gillibrand (D-NY), Yea
Graham (R-SC), Nay
Grassley (R-IA), Nay
Hagerty (R-TN), Not Voting
Hassan (D-NH), Yea
Hawley (R-MO), Nay
Heinrich (D-NM), Yea
Hickenlooper (D-CO), Yea
Hirono (D-HI), Yea
Hoeven (R-ND), Nay
Hyde-Smith (R-MS), Nay
Inhofe (R-OK), Nay
Johnson (R-WI), Nay
Kaine (D-VA), Yea
Kelly (D-AZ), Yea
Kennedy (R-LA), Nay
King (I-ME), Yea
Klobuchar (D-MN), Yea
Lankford (R-OK), Nay
Leahy (D-VT), Yea
Lee (R-UT), Nay
Lujan (D-NM), Yea
Lummis (R-WY), Nay
Manchin (D-WV), Yea
Markey (D-MA), Yea
Marshall (R-KS), Nay
McConnell (R-KY), Nay
Menendez (D-NJ), Yea
Merkley (D-OR), Yea
Moran (R-KS), Nay
Murkowski (R-AK), Nay
Murphy (D-CT), Yea
Murray (D-WA), Yea
Ossoff (D-GA), Yea
Padilla (D-CA), Yea
Paul (R-KY), Nay
Peters (D-MI), Yea
Portman (R-OH), Nay
Reed (D-RI), Yea
Risch (R-ID), Nay
Romney (R-UT), Nay
Rosen (D-NV), Yea
Rounds (R-SD), Nay
Rubio (R-FL), Nay
Sanders (I-VT), Yea
Sasse (R-NE), Nay
Schatz (D-HI), Yea
Schumer (D-NY), Yea
Scott (R-FL), Nay
Scott (R-SC), Nay
Shaheen (D-NH), Yea
Shelby (R-AL), Nay
Sinema (D-AZ), Yea
Smith (D-MN), Yea
Stabenow (D-MI), Yea
Sullivan (R-AK), Nay
Tester (D-MT), Yea
Thune (R-SD), Not Voting
Tillis (R-NC), Nay
Toomey (R-PA), Nay
Tuberville (R-AL), Nay
Van Hollen (D-MD), Yea
Warner (D-VA), Yea
Warnock (D-GA), Yea
Warren (D-MA), Yea
Whitehouse (D-RI), Yea
Wicker (R-MS), Nay
Wyden (D-OR), Yea
Young (R-IN), Nay

Grouped By Vote Position 

YEAs ---50

Baldwin (D-WI)
Bennet (D-CO)
Blumenthal (D-CT)
Booker (D-NJ)
Brown (D-OH)
Cantwell (D-WA)
Cardin (D-MD)
Carper (D-DE)
Casey (D-PA)
Coons (D-DE)
Cortez Masto (D-NV)
Duckworth (D-IL)
Durbin (D-IL)
Feinstein (D-CA)
Gillibrand (D-NY)
Hassan (D-NH)
Heinrich (D-NM)
Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Hirono (D-HI)
Kaine (D-VA)
Kelly (D-AZ)
King (I-ME)
Klobuchar (D-MN)
Leahy (D-VT)
Lujan (D-NM)
Manchin (D-WV)
Markey (D-MA)
Menendez (D-NJ)
Merkley (D-OR)
Murphy (D-CT)
Murray (D-WA)
Ossoff (D-GA)
Padilla (D-CA)
Peters (D-MI)
Reed (D-RI)
Rosen (D-NV)
Sanders (I-VT)
Schatz (D-HI)
Schumer (D-NY)
Shaheen (D-NH)
Sinema (D-AZ)
Smith (D-MN)
Stabenow (D-MI)
Tester (D-MT)
Van Hollen (D-MD)
Warner (D-VA)
Warnock (D-GA)
Warren (D-MA)
Whitehouse (D-RI)
Wyden (D-OR)

NAYs ---47

Blackburn (R-TN)
Blunt (R-MO)
Boozman (R-AR)
Braun (R-IN)
Burr (R-NC)
Capito (R-WV)
Cassidy (R-LA)
Collins (R-ME)
Cornyn (R-TX)
Cotton (R-AR)
Cramer (R-ND)
Crapo (R-ID)
Cruz (R-TX)
Daines (R-MT)
Ernst (R-IA)
Fischer (R-NE)
Graham (R-SC)
Grassley (R-IA)
Hawley (R-MO)
Hoeven (R-ND)
Hyde-Smith (R-MS)
Inhofe (R-OK)
Johnson (R-WI)
Kennedy (R-LA)
Lankford (R-OK)
Lee (R-UT)
Lummis (R-WY)
Marshall (R-KS)
McConnell (R-KY)
Moran (R-KS)
Murkowski (R-AK)
Paul (R-KY)
Portman (R-OH)
Risch (R-ID)
Romney (R-UT)
Rounds (R-SD)
Rubio (R-FL)
Sasse (R-NE)
Scott (R-FL)
Scott (R-SC)
Shelby (R-AL)
Sullivan (R-AK)
Tillis (R-NC)
Toomey (R-PA)
Tuberville (R-AL)
Wicker (R-MS)
Young (R-IN)

Not Voting - 3

Barrasso (R-WY)
Hagerty (R-TN)
Thune (R-SD)

Grouped by Home State 

Alabama:


Shelby (R-AL), Nay

Tuberville (R-AL), Nay


Alaska:


Murkowski (R-AK), Nay

Sullivan (R-AK), Nay


Arizona:


Kelly (D-AZ), Yea

Sinema (D-AZ), Yea


Arkansas:


Boozman (R-AR), Nay

Cotton (R-AR), Nay


California:


Feinstein (D-CA), Yea

Padilla (D-CA), Yea


Colorado:


Bennet (D-CO), Yea

Hickenlooper (D-CO), Yea


Connecticut:


Blumenthal (D-CT), Yea

Murphy (D-CT), Yea


Delaware:


Carper (D-DE), Yea

Coons (D-DE), Yea


Florida:


Rubio (R-FL), Nay

Scott (R-FL), Nay


Georgia:


Ossoff (D-GA), Yea

Warnock (D-GA), Yea


Hawaii:


Hirono (D-HI), Yea

Schatz (D-HI), Yea


Idaho:


Crapo (R-ID), Nay

Risch (R-ID), Nay


Illinois:


Duckworth (D-IL), Yea

Durbin (D-IL), Yea


Indiana:


Braun (R-IN), Nay

Young (R-IN), Nay


Iowa:


Ernst (R-IA), Nay

Grassley (R-IA), Nay


Kansas:


Marshall (R-KS), Nay

Moran (R-KS), Nay


Kentucky:


McConnell (R-KY), Nay

Paul (R-KY), Nay


Louisiana:


Cassidy (R-LA), Nay

Kennedy (R-LA), Nay


Maine:


Collins (R-ME), Nay

King (I-ME), Yea


Maryland:


Cardin (D-MD), Yea

Van Hollen (D-MD), Yea


Massachusetts:


Markey (D-MA), Yea

Warren (D-MA), Yea


Michigan:


Peters (D-MI), Yea

Stabenow (D-MI), Yea


Minnesota:


Klobuchar (D-MN), Yea

Smith (D-MN), Yea


Mississippi:


Hyde-Smith (R-MS), Nay

Wicker (R-MS), Nay


Missouri:


Blunt (R-MO), Nay

Hawley (R-MO), Nay


Montana:


Daines (R-MT), Nay

Tester (D-MT), Yea


Nebraska:


Fischer (R-NE), Nay

Sasse (R-NE), Nay


Nevada:


Cortez Masto (D-NV), Yea

Rosen (D-NV), Yea


New Hampshire:


Hassan (D-NH), Yea

Shaheen (D-NH), Yea


New Jersey:


Booker (D-NJ), Yea

Menendez (D-NJ), Yea


New Mexico:


Heinrich (D-NM), Yea

Lujan (D-NM), Yea


New York:


Gillibrand (D-NY), Yea

Schumer (D-NY), Yea


North Carolina:


Burr (R-NC), Nay

Tillis (R-NC), Nay


North Dakota:


Cramer (R-ND), Nay

Hoeven (R-ND), Nay


Ohio:


Brown (D-OH), Yea

Portman (R-OH), Nay


Oklahoma:


Inhofe (R-OK), Nay

Lankford (R-OK), Nay


Oregon:


Merkley (D-OR), Yea

Wyden (D-OR), Yea


Pennsylvania:


Casey (D-PA), Yea

Toomey (R-PA), Nay


Rhode Island:


Reed (D-RI), Yea

Whitehouse (D-RI), Yea


South Carolina:


Graham (R-SC), Nay

Scott (R-SC), Nay


South Dakota:


Rounds (R-SD), Nay

Thune (R-SD), Not Voting


Tennessee:


Blackburn (R-TN), Nay

Hagerty (R-TN), Not Voting


Texas:


Cornyn (R-TX), Nay

Cruz (R-TX), Nay


Utah:


Lee (R-UT), Nay

Romney (R-UT), Nay


Vermont:


Leahy (D-VT), Yea

Sanders (I-VT), Yea


Virginia:


Kaine (D-VA), Yea

Warner (D-VA), Yea


Washington:


Cantwell (D-WA), Yea

Murray (D-WA), Yea


West Virginia:


Capito (R-WV), Nay

Manchin (D-WV), Yea


Wisconsin:


Baldwin (D-WI), Yea

Johnson (R-WI), Nay


Wyoming:


Barrasso (R-WY), Not Voting

Lummis (R-WY), Nay


Источник: https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=117&session=1&vote=00475

US reports 1st Omicron case in California. What we know so far

The United States has announced its first confirmed case of Omicron, the new variant of Covid, in a traveller who has recently returned from South Africa. This is the first known case of the new variant, first identified by South African scientists, in the US, as several reports now suggest that the variant was present in Europe before South Africa reported the first case. Much about the new variant is not known yet, but its emergence has created fresh apprehension across the world with most of the countries putting travel restrictions.

Here is what we know about US' 1st Omicron case:

1. The traveller was fully vaccinated against Covid but did not receive any booster dose.

2. The person returned from South Africa on November 22. All his contacts have tested negative.

3. The person tested positive on November 29 and was in self-quarantine.

4. At present, the patient is recovering from the symptoms. "We feel good that this patient not only had mild symptoms but actually the symptoms appear to be improving," US top health official Anthony Fauci said.

WHO confirms Omicron Covid-19 variant in 23 countries. Here’s the full list

5. The San Francisco health department and California's state health department jointly confirmed the case issuing a statement that the variant was found thanks to the state's testing and genome sequencing surveillance.

6. According to reports, the passenger began her travel back to the United States on November 21 and landed in San Francisco on November 22.

7. On November 25, the person experienced symptoms and three days later for testing. The sequencing was done by the University of California.

8. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is not investigating any other potential Omicron cases in the US, reports said.

9. The new variant was identified in under 30 hours "from the time of collection to strain information", it has been said.

10. The Governor of California said there is no reason to panic but everyone should remain vigilant.

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Close StoryИсточник: https://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/us-reports-1st-omicron-case-in-california-what-we-know-so-far-101638403684043.html

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United States Reports 1st Case of Omicron Variant in Traveler Returning to California

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The U.S. recorded its first confirmed case of the omicron variant Wednesday — in a vaccinated traveler who returned to California after a trip to South Africa — as scientists around the world race to establish whether the new, mutant version of the coronavirus is more dangerous than previous ones.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the United States’ top infectious-disease expert, announced the finding at the White House.

“We knew it was just a matter of time before the first case of omicron would be detected in the United States,” he said.

The infected person was identified as a traveler who had returned from South Africa on Nov. 22, developed mild symptoms and tested positive for COVID-19 Monday. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco obtained a sample from the patient Tuesday evening and worked feverishly overnight to assemble the genetic sequence.

The person, who had had the full two doses of the Moderna vaccine and wasn’t yet due for a booster shot, is improving, California officials said.

Fauci and other medical experts strongly emphasized that Americans should continue to get vaccinated and get their booster shots. The vaccine has been proven to reduce the risk of severe illness and death, and Fauci said it is reasonable to believe it will offer protection against the omicron variant.

The mild nature of the California person’s infection “is a testimony to the importance of united 1st vaccinations,” said California Health Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly.

All the individual’s close contacts have been reached and have tested negative, officials said. The patient, who agreed to remain in quarantine, was identified only as being between 18 and 49.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom expressed confidence in the state’s efforts to control the virus and said he does not anticipate imposing another stay-at-home order or other shutdown measures.

At least 23 other countries have reported omicron infections since South African authorities first identified the variant a week ago — an announcement that led the U.S. and many other nations to almost immediately bar airline travelers arriving from southern Africa.

In South Africa, new cases of COVID-19 nearly doubled in a single day to almost 8,600, authorities reported Wednesday, and the country’s National Institute for Communicable Diseases said omicron has now overtaken the delta variant among samples now being analyzed at the genetic level.

But the variant is still surrounded by many unknowns, among them: Is it more contagious than other versions, as some scientists are beginning to suspect? Does it make people more seriously ill? And can it evade examples of the 1st law of thermodynamics vaccine?

“Any declaration of what will or will not happen with this variant, I think it is too early to say,” Fauci said.

European Union Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said it will take two to three weeks before it becomes fully clear how old is na omicron can do to the world.

“This is, in normal times, a short period. In pandemic times, it’s an eternity,” she lamented.

In California, the genetic analysis of the patient’s virus from UCSF was confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We will likely see this scenario play out multiple times across the country in the coming days or weeks,” said Scott Becker, CEO of the Association of Public Health Laboratories.

“This particular case shows the system working as it was designed to work — an individual with travel history from South Africa, an astute laboratory and quick prioritization of the specimen for sequencing, and close coordination with public health officials.”

Nigeria and Saudi Arabia also reported omicron infections Wednesday, marking the first known cases in West Africa 0 1 2 3 4 5 the Persian Gulf region.

Going further than many other countries in trying to contain the virus, Japan has banned foreign visitors and asked international airlines to stop taking new reservations for all flights arriving in the country until the end of December.

The U.S. is working toward requiring that all air travelers to the country be tested for COVID-19 within a day before boarding their flights, up from the current three days.

On Wednesday, the World Health Organization warned that blanket travel bans are complicating the sharing of lab samples from South Africa that could help scientists understand the new variant.

At the same time the omicron variant is spreading new fear and uncertainty, the dominant delta variant is still creating havoc, especially in Europe. Many countries there are dealing with a surge in infections and hospitalizations, despite a relatively high vaccination rate of 67% of the European Union’s population.

For the first time, von der Leyen said EU nations should consider making vaccinations mandatory. Greece plans to fine people over 60 who don’t get the shot. And German Chancellor-designate Olaf Scholz said he will back a proposal to require everyone to get vaccinated.

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Источник: https://www.theintelligencer.net/news/top-headlines/2021/12/united-states-reports-1st-case-of-omicron-variant-in-traveler-returning-to-california/

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Источник: https://www.npr.org/2021/12/01/1060608411/1st-case-of-the-omicron-variant-in-the-u-s-has-been-reported-in-california
XML Vote Summary 

Question: (Motion to Discharge: Rachael S. Rollins to be U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts from the Committee on the Judiciary )

Vote Number: 475

Vote Date: December 2, 2021, 05:01 PM

Required For Majority: 1/2

Vote Result: Motion to Discharge Agreed to

Nomination Number: PN930

Nomination Description: Rachael S. Rollins, of Massachusetts, to be United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts for the term of four years

Vote Counts:

YEAs50

NAYs

47

Not Voting

3

*Information compiled through Senate LIS by the Senate bill clerk under the direction of the secretary of the Senate

Alphabetical by Senator Name 

Baldwin (D-WI), Yea
Barrasso (R-WY), Not Voting
Bennet (D-CO), Yea
Blackburn (R-TN), Nay
Blumenthal (D-CT), Yea
Blunt (R-MO), Nay
Booker (D-NJ), Yea
Boozman (R-AR), Nay
Braun (R-IN), Nay
Brown (D-OH), Yea
Burr (R-NC), Nay
Cantwell (D-WA), Yea
Capito (R-WV), Nay
Cardin (D-MD), Yea
Carper (D-DE), Yea
Casey (D-PA), Yea
Cassidy (R-LA), Nay
Collins (R-ME), Nay
Coons (D-DE), Yea
Cornyn (R-TX), Nay
Cortez Masto (D-NV), Yea
Cotton (R-AR), Nay
Cramer (R-ND), Nay
Crapo (R-ID), Nay
Cruz (R-TX), Nay
Daines (R-MT), Nay
Duckworth (D-IL), Yea
Durbin (D-IL), Yea
Ernst (R-IA), Nay
Feinstein (D-CA), Yea
Fischer (R-NE), Nay
Gillibrand (D-NY), Yea
Graham (R-SC), Nay
Grassley (R-IA), Nay
Hagerty (R-TN), Not Voting
Hassan (D-NH), Yea
Hawley (R-MO), Nay
Heinrich (D-NM), Yea
Hickenlooper (D-CO), Yea
Hirono (D-HI), Yea
Hoeven (R-ND), Nay
Hyde-Smith (R-MS), Nay
Inhofe (R-OK), Nay
Johnson (R-WI), Nay
Kaine (D-VA), Yea
Kelly (D-AZ), Yea
Kennedy (R-LA), Nay
King (I-ME), Yea
Klobuchar (D-MN), Yea
Lankford (R-OK), Nay
Leahy (D-VT), Yea
Lee (R-UT), florida commerce credit union online banking (D-NM), Yea
Lummis (R-WY), Nay
Manchin (D-WV), Yea
Markey (D-MA), Yea
Marshall (R-KS), Nay
McConnell (R-KY), Nay
Menendez (D-NJ), Yea
Merkley (D-OR), Yea
Moran (R-KS), Nay
Murkowski (R-AK), Nay
Murphy (D-CT), Yea
Murray (D-WA), Yea
Ossoff (D-GA), Yea
Padilla (D-CA), Yea
Paul (R-KY), Nay
Peters (D-MI), Yea
Portman (R-OH), Nay
Reed (D-RI), Yea
Risch (R-ID), Nay
Romney (R-UT), Nay
Rosen (D-NV), Yea
Rounds (R-SD), Nay
Rubio (R-FL), Nay
Sanders (I-VT), Yea
Sasse (R-NE), Nay
Schatz (D-HI), Yea
Schumer (D-NY), Yea
Scott (R-FL), Nay
Scott (R-SC), Nay
Shaheen (D-NH), Yea
Shelby (R-AL), Nay
Sinema (D-AZ), Yea
Smith (D-MN), Yea
Stabenow (D-MI), Yea
Sullivan (R-AK), Nay
Tester (D-MT), Yea
Thune (R-SD), Not Voting
Tillis (R-NC), Nay
Toomey (R-PA), Nay
Tuberville (R-AL), Nay
Van Hollen (D-MD), Yea
Warner (D-VA), Yea
Warnock (D-GA), Yea
Warren (D-MA), Yea
Whitehouse (D-RI), Yea
Wicker (R-MS), Nay
Wyden (D-OR), Yea
Young (R-IN), Nay

Grouped By Vote Position 

YEAs ---50

Baldwin (D-WI)
Bennet (D-CO)
Blumenthal (D-CT)
Booker (D-NJ)
Brown (D-OH)
Cantwell (D-WA)
Cardin (D-MD)
Carper (D-DE)
Casey (D-PA)
Coons (D-DE)
Cortez Masto (D-NV)
Duckworth (D-IL)
Durbin (D-IL)
Feinstein (D-CA)
Gillibrand (D-NY)
Hassan (D-NH)
Heinrich (D-NM)
Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Hirono (D-HI)
Kaine (D-VA)
Kelly (D-AZ)
King (I-ME)
Klobuchar (D-MN)
Leahy (D-VT)
Lujan (D-NM)
Manchin (D-WV)
Markey (D-MA)
Menendez (D-NJ)
Merkley (D-OR)
Murphy (D-CT)
Murray (D-WA)
Ossoff (D-GA)
Padilla (D-CA)
Peters (D-MI)
Reed (D-RI)
Rosen (D-NV)
Sanders (I-VT)
Schatz (D-HI)
Schumer (D-NY)
Shaheen (D-NH)
Sinema (D-AZ)
Smith (D-MN)
Stabenow (D-MI)
Tester (D-MT)
Van Hollen (D-MD)
Warner (D-VA)
Warnock (D-GA)
Warren (D-MA)
Whitehouse (D-RI)
Wyden (D-OR)

NAYs ---47

Blackburn (R-TN)
Blunt (R-MO)
Boozman (R-AR)
Braun (R-IN)
Burr (R-NC)
Capito (R-WV)
Cassidy (R-LA)
Collins (R-ME)
Cornyn (R-TX)
Cotton (R-AR)
Cramer (R-ND)
Crapo (R-ID)
Cruz (R-TX)
Daines (R-MT)
Ernst (R-IA)
Fischer (R-NE)
Graham (R-SC)
Grassley (R-IA)
Hawley (R-MO)
Hoeven (R-ND)
Hyde-Smith (R-MS)
Inhofe (R-OK)
Johnson (R-WI)
Kennedy (R-LA)
Lankford (R-OK)
Lee (R-UT)
Lummis (R-WY)
Marshall (R-KS)
McConnell (R-KY)
Moran (R-KS)
Murkowski (R-AK)
Paul (R-KY)
Portman (R-OH)
Risch (R-ID)
Romney (R-UT)
Rounds (R-SD)
Rubio (R-FL)
Sasse (R-NE)
Scott (R-FL)
Scott (R-SC)
Shelby (R-AL)
Sullivan (R-AK)
Tillis (R-NC)
Toomey (R-PA)
Tuberville (R-AL)
Wicker (R-MS)
Young (R-IN)

Not Voting - bb king guitar commercial (R-WY)
Hagerty (R-TN)
Thune (R-SD)

Grouped by Home State 

Alabama:


Shelby (R-AL), Nay

Tuberville (R-AL), Nay


Alaska:


Murkowski (R-AK), Nay

Sullivan (R-AK), Nay


Arizona:


Kelly (D-AZ), Yea

Sinema (D-AZ), Yea


Arkansas:


Boozman (R-AR), Nay

Cotton (R-AR), Nay


California:


Feinstein (D-CA), Yea

Padilla (D-CA), Yea


Colorado:


Bennet (D-CO), Yea

Hickenlooper (D-CO), Yea


Connecticut:


Blumenthal (D-CT), Yea

Murphy (D-CT), Yea


Delaware:


Carper (D-DE), Yea

Coons (D-DE), Yea


Florida:


Rubio (R-FL), Nay

Scott (R-FL), Nay


Georgia:


Ossoff (D-GA), Yea

Warnock (D-GA), Yea


Hawaii:


Hirono (D-HI), Yea

Schatz (D-HI), Yea


Idaho:


Crapo (R-ID), Nay

Risch (R-ID), Nay


Illinois:


Duckworth (D-IL), Yea

Durbin (D-IL), Yea


Indiana:


Braun (R-IN), Nay

Young (R-IN), Nay


Iowa:


Ernst (R-IA), Nay

Grassley (R-IA), Nay


Kansas:


Marshall (R-KS), Nay

Moran (R-KS), Nay


Kentucky:


McConnell (R-KY), Nay

Paul (R-KY), Nay


Louisiana:


Cassidy (R-LA), Nay

Kennedy (R-LA), Nay


Maine:


Collins (R-ME), Nay

King (I-ME), Yea


Maryland:


Cardin (D-MD), Yea

Van Hollen (D-MD), Yea


Massachusetts:


Markey (D-MA), Yea

Warren (D-MA), Yea


Michigan:


Peters (D-MI), Yea

Stabenow (D-MI), Yea


Minnesota:


Klobuchar (D-MN), Yea

Smith (D-MN), Yea


Mississippi:


Hyde-Smith (R-MS), Nay

Wicker what is the routing number for renasant bank, Nay


Missouri:


Blunt (R-MO), Nay

Hawley (R-MO), Nay


Montana:


Daines (R-MT), Nay

Tester (D-MT), Yea


Nebraska:


Fischer (R-NE), Nay

Sasse (R-NE), Nay


Nevada:


Cortez Masto (D-NV), Yea

Rosen (D-NV), Yea


New Hampshire:


Hassan (D-NH), Yea

Shaheen (D-NH), Yea


New Jersey:


Booker (D-NJ), Yea

Menendez (D-NJ), Yea


New Mexico:


Heinrich (D-NM), Yea

Lujan (D-NM), Yea


New York:


Gillibrand (D-NY), Yea

Schumer (D-NY), Yea


North Carolina:


Burr (R-NC), Nay

Tillis (R-NC), Nay


North Dakota:


Cramer (R-ND), Nay

Hoeven (R-ND), Nay


Ohio:


Brown (D-OH), Yea

Portman (R-OH), Nay


Oklahoma:


Inhofe (R-OK), Nay

Lankford (R-OK), Nay


Oregon:


Merkley (D-OR), Yea

Wyden (D-OR), Yea


Pennsylvania:


Casey (D-PA), Yea

Toomey (R-PA), Nay


Rhode Island:


Reed (D-RI), Yea

Whitehouse (D-RI), Yea


South Carolina:


Graham (R-SC), Nay

Scott (R-SC), Nay


South Dakota:


Rounds (R-SD), Nay

Thune (R-SD), Not Voting


Tennessee:


Blackburn (R-TN), Nay

Hagerty (R-TN), Not Voting


Texas:


Cornyn (R-TX), Nay

Cruz (R-TX), Nay


Utah:


Lee (R-UT), Nay

Romney (R-UT), Nay


Vermont:


Leahy (D-VT), Yea

Sanders (I-VT), Yea


Virginia:


Kaine (D-VA), Yea

Warner (D-VA), Yea


Washington:


Cantwell (D-WA), Yea

Murray (D-WA), Yea


West Virginia:


Capito (R-WV), Nay

Manchin (D-WV), Yea


Wisconsin:


Baldwin (D-WI), Yea

Johnson (R-WI), Nay


Wyoming:


Barrasso (R-WY), Not Voting

Lummis (R-WY), Nay


Источник: https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=117&session=1&vote=00475

1st Infantry Division Soldiers begin Combined Resolve XVI

U.S. Army Pfc. Austin Daniele (right) with the 101st Brigade Support Battalion “Liberty,” 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division fuels a vehicle for Spc. Dillon Ranne with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1ABCT, 1ID, as they prepare for the field portion of Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany, Dec. 2, 2021. Soldiers of HHC set up the tactical operations center where brigade leadership will direct multinational combined arms operations in a complex, multi-domain simulated battlespace. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other.
U.S. Army Pfc. Austin Daniele (top), with the 101st Brigade Support Battalion “Liberty,” 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team1st Infantry Division, fuels a vehicle for Spc. Logan Davis with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1ABCT, 1ID, as they united 1st for the field portion of Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint <a href=Td bank change billing address Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany, Nov. 30, 2021. Soldiers of the HHC set up the tactical operations center where brigade leadership will direct multinational combined arms operations in a complex, multi-domain simulated battlespace. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other. " src="https://api.army.mil/e2/c/images/2021/12/02/74aff723/size0-full.jpg">
Soldiers with the 38th Mechanized Battalion, Bulgarian Land Forces apply camouflage to their BTR-60 armored personnel carriers, as they prepare for the field portion of Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany, Dec. 1, 2021. Several U.S. allied and partner nation militaries are involved in CBR XVI, and their participation makes the exercise an excellent opportunity to further develop and refine procedures for command and control across multinational formations. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other.
Soldiers with the 38th Mechanized Battalion, Bulgarian Land Forces, apply camouflage to their BTR-60 armored personnel carriers, as they prepare for the field portion of Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany, Dec. 1, 2021. Several U.S. allied and partner nation militaries are involved in CBR XVI, and their participation makes the exercise an excellent opportunity to further develop and refine procedures for command and control across multinational formations. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other.

HOHENFELS, Germany — A blanket of snow fell upon tanks, armored personnel carriers and fuel trucks, staged and ready for action at Camp Albertshof, Joint Multinational Readiness Center, Hohenfels Training Area, Germany, December 2nd.

Soldiers climbed through the snow to a newly established tactical operations center and connected the command and control systems of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division. Other Soldiers outfitted their vehicles and weapons with MILES gear (Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System), a system of sensors used to determine hits in a combat exercise. The snow obscured the details of the Soldiers and their equipment as they worked through the snowy dusk of day. It was difficult to see that they were not all of the same unit, or even in the same nation’s military.

As the first hard push of winter settled over Bavaria, Germany, the Soldiers took little notice. They worked hard preparing to fight together. Units from many nations prepared to go into the field as part of Combined Resolve XVI and to affirm that, together, they will be victorious bank of america branches in delhi any conflict.

CBR XVI is a United States Army Europe and Africa directed, 7th Army Training Command conducted, JMRC hosted training event for 1ABCT from Nov. 17 to Dec. 20. The event is designed to evaluate and assess 1ABCT’s ability to conduct multinational operations in a multi-domain simulated battlespace.

Cpl. Dante Price with 1st Battalion, 5th Field Artillery Regiment “Hamilton’s Own,” 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, guides a light medium tactical vehicle through a motor pool in preparation for Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center (JMRC) in Hohenfels, Germany, Nov. 30, 2021. CBR XVI is a United States Army Europe and Africa directed, 7th Army Training Command conducted, JMRC hosted training event for the U.S. Army’s 1ABCT, 1ID, from Nov. 17 to Dec. 20. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other.
Ray Arbogast (left) a technician with Training Support Activity Europe prepares to install Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear onto several vehicles from multinational participants, as they prepare for the field portion of Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany, Nov. 30, 2021. MILES gear is a system that tracks hits in a combat engagement exercise and helps participating units assess the lethality of their formations. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other.
Spc. Clayton Williams, a wheeled vehicle mechanic in the 101st Brigade Support Battalion “Liberty,” 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, performs preventative maintenance and services in preparation for Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany, Nov. 30th, 2021. CBR XVI is an event that enhances the 1ID’s readiness by exercising its ability to conduct multinational combined arms operations in a complex, multi-domain simulated battlespace. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other.
U.S. Army 2nd Lt. Troy Allen (left), a Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and High-Yield Explosives officer with the 1st Brigade Engineer Battalion “Diehard,” 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, watches Training Support Activity Europe technicians install Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear onto his M1126 “Stryker” Infantry Carrier Vehicle, as his unit prepares for the <a href=www fidelity investments portion of Combined Resolve XVI at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany, Nov. 30, 2021. MILES gear is a system that tracks hits in a combat engagement exercise and helps participating units assess the lethality of their formations. Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other." src="https://api.army.mil/e2/c/images/2021/12/02/551a9d85/size0-full.jpg">

“Multinational military exercises not only sustain our readiness to conduct large-scale operations in a dynamic environment, but are an important part of achieving interoperability with our unified allied partners,” said Maj. Gen. Adam Joks, Deputy Commanding General — Interoperability, V Corps. “This is a great opportunity for our Soldiers to train alongside their multinational counterparts across all warfighting functions and to gain valuable personal experience. Our Soldiers learn about the unique capabilities our allies bring to the table, and this allows them to share their experience to create a more lethal coalition.”

Combined Resolve XVI includes approximately 4,600 Soldiers from Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom and the United States. The operations are being conducted by integrated battalions with multinational units operating under a unified command and control element allowing the U.S., its allies and partners to experience invaluable training alongside each other.

“By conducting combined operations with our allies, our Soldiers learn how to work together effectively and efficiently to achieve tactical objectives,” Joks said. “Conducting complex multinational training exercises strengthens interoperability by integrating systems, procedures and building lasting relationships with our allies.”

Since April 2014, U.S. Army Europe and Africa has led the Department of Defense’s European land efforts by bringing units based in the U.S. to Europe for nine months at a time, an effort known as Atlantic Resolve. These rotations train with allies and partners across Europe on an ongoing basis creating a unified front which serves to deter aggression in the region.

Combined Resolve XVI is a united 1st representation of U.S. commitment to a free, democratic, safe and secure Europe by maintaining readiness to dominate large-scale operations in the European theater.

To view more visual products from Combined Resolve XVI, visit: https://www.dvidshub.net/feature/CombinedResolve

To learn more about Atlantic Resolve, visit: https://www.europeafrica.army.mil/AtlanticResolve/

Источник: https://www.army.mil/article/252422/1st_infantry_division_soldiers_begin_combined_resolve_xvi

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National HIV/AIDS Strategy (2022-2025)

National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States, 2022-2025

National HIV/AIDS Strategy

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (2022–2025) provides stakeholders across the nation with a roadmap to accelerate efforts to end the HIV epidemic in the United States by 2030. The Strategy reflects President Biden’s commitment to re-energize and strengthen a first united methodist church dothan al response to the epidemic while supporting people with HIV and reducing HIV-associated morbidity and mortality.

The White House’s Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP), part of the Domestic Policy Council, facilitated development of and published the Strategy, which builds on the 2021 HIV National Strategic Plan and gpa requirements for south carolina state university two prior National HIV/AIDS Strategies (2010, 2015). (Read about the prior National Strategic Plan and Strategies.)

Vision and Goals

The Strategy articulates a clear vision to guide the nation’s response to HIV:

The United States will be a place where new HIV infections united 1st prevented, every person knows their status, and every person with HIV has high-quality care and treatment, lives free from stigma and discrimination, and can achieve their full potential for health and well-being across the lifespan.

This vision includes all people, regardless of age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, disability, geographic location, or socioeconomic circumstance.

The Strategy sets bold targets for ending the HIV epidemic in the United States by united 1st, including a 75% reduction in new HIV infections by 2025 and a 90% reduction by 2030. To guide the nation toward realizing the vision, the Strategy focuses on four goals:

  • Prevent new HIV infections.
  • Improve HIV-related health outcomes of people with HIV.
  • Reduce HIV-related disparities and health inequities.
  • Achieve integrated, coordinated efforts that address the HIV epidemic among all partners and stakeholders.

Objectives, Strategies, and Priority Populations

National HIV/AIDS Strategy - What You Need to Know

For stakeholders across the nation, the National HIV/AIDS Strategy:

  • Details 21 objectives and 78 strategies for federal and nonfederal stakeholders to implement to achieve the goals.
  • Designates five priority populations disproportionately impacted by HIV so that federal agencies and other stakeholders can focus efforts and resources to achieve the greatest impact.
  • Identifies nine core indicators to monitor national progress, establishes a disparity indicator stratified by the priority populations to measure progress toward reducing significant HIV-related disparities, and identifies the topic of a new indicator to be developed.

Development Process

ONAP developed the updated Strategy in the latter half of 2021, informed by significant input from community stakeholders, including people living with HIV, and united 1st by federal partners from nine federal Departments whose programs, policies, services, or activities contribute to our national response to HIV. The Strategy builds on the progress achieved and lessons learned from the prior national strategies and seeks to leverage new tools and opportunities to address the challenges that remain.

Implementing the Strategy

ONAP will work with federal partners in early 2022 to produce a Federal Implementation Plan that documents specific actions that federal departments and agencies will take to achieve the Strategy’s goals and objectives. Progress toward meeting the Strategy’s goals will be monitored and reported annually.

But federal activity alone can’t end the HIV epidemic. That is why the Strategy is a national one, not just a federal one. The Strategy is a call to action for stakeholders from all sectors of society. Achieving its goals will require the engagement of stakeholders from all sectors of society in a more coordinated, re-energized national response to HIV. This includes the collaborative efforts of people with or at risk for HIV; public health professionals; health care providers; people working in state, tribal, and local government; staff of faith- and community-based organizations; educators; researchers; and people leading and working in private industry. 

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy and the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. Initiative

The Strategy united 1st the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. (EHE) initiative are closely aligned and complementary. They have the common goal of reducing new HIV transmissions in the United States by 75% by 2025 and by 90% by 2030. The Strategy is the broader, overarching national plan that extends across many federal departments and encompasses the entire nation. The EHE initiative will be a leading component of the work by the Department of Health and Human Services – in collaboration with state, tribal, territorial, and local partners – to implement the Strategy.

Источник: https://www.hiv.gov/federal-response/national-hiv-aids-strategy/national-hiv-aids-strategy-2021-2025

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