Skip to content

Archives

Apple pencil 1st gen not charging


apple pencil 1st gen not charging

Apple was experimenting with tablets long before the iPad came out. The first generation iPad Pro, Apple Pencil & Mini 4. iPad knows whether you're using your finger or Apple Pencil. Slip off the magnetic cap of Apple Pencil to reveal a Lightning connector that lets you charge. Can I "slow"-charge the Pencil (say at 1C rate, therefore not slow at all) so as to prevent the hypothesized deterioration of the battery due to the default.
apple pencil 1st gen not charging
apple pencil 1st gen not charging

Why is my Apple Pencil not working? Here's how to fix it

The Apple Pencil is the best stylus you can use with your iPad but alas, nothing is perfect – not even the Apple Pencil. Perhaps you’ve found yourself in the middle of sketching or taking notes when all of a sudden, your pen strokes aren’t appearing on-screen. You lament: “Why is my Apple Pencil not working?” 

We’ve put together a list of four reasons why your Apple Pencil may have stopped working along with the steps you can take to fix the issue. Some of these reasons may seem painfully obvious, but others less so. Fortunately, most Apple Pencil issues can be resolved without having to make a trip to the Genius Bar.

We believe the iPad Pro is one of the best drawing tablets you can buy. The sublime experience of drawing with an Apple Pencil is one of the myriad reasons walmart asurion sign in we think so. Thus, getting your Apple Pencil to work once again is crucial, and we're here to help with that.

Is your major problem with the Apple Pencil the fact that you keep misplacing it? Learn how to avoid losing your Apple Pencil and avoid shelling out money for a replacement. Meanwhile, if you want to use the Apple Pencil to its fullest potential, have a look at the best iPad Convert 70 degrees f to c apps that work beautifully with the Apple Pencil. 

Why is my Apple Pencil not working: Charging problems

Your Apple Pencil may have stopped www bbvacompass com login because it ran out of juice. Fortunately, this is very easy to deduce – check the Today View on your iPad to see how much of a charge your Apple Pencil has left. 

How you charge your Apple Pencil varies between models. If you have a first-generation Apple Pencil, plug it into your iPad’s Lightning connector or via USB with the Apple Pencil Charging Adapter. A second-generation Apple Pencil, meanwhile, can charge when you attach it to the magnetic connector on your iPad.

Why is my Apple Pencil not working: Pairing problems

There’s a chance your Apple Pencil unpaired from your iPad. Check your iPad's Bluetooth settings to confirm this. If your iPad’s Bluetooth is enabled, go ahead and re-pair your Apple Pencil.

To pair a first-generation Apple Pencil (see our Apple Pencil 1 review), simply plug it into your iPad via the Lightning connector, which will then generate a prompt asking if you’d like to pair. If you have a second-generation Apple Pencil, just attach it to the magnetic connector on your iPad to pair it.

Why is my Apple Pencil not working: Nib problems

The quality of the tip of your Apple Pencil (also known as the west and company realtors can hinder your ability to draw properly on your iPad. The Apple Pencil’s nib is loose – which means you’ll just have to tighten it. However, if the Apple Pencil nib feels rough to the touch, or it doesn’t glide smoothly on your iPad screen, it’s time to replace it with a new one. (Another way to tell: your Apple Pencil tip has exposed metal.)

The first-generation Apple Pencil comes with one replacement tip, but the second-generation Apple Pencil doesn’t include any spare nibs at all. Fortunately, you can purchase a replacement pack of Apple Pencil tips so you’ll always be ready to replace the nib when needed. (You'll find some deals for those below.)

Why is my Apple Pencil not working: Compatibility problems

Your Apple Pencil is properly paired, fully charged, and has a fresh nib, but it’s still not working. In this case, it could be a compatibility issue with the app you’re using. Double-check that the drawing or note-taking app you plan to use can support the Apple Pencil – especially if it’s an app you have to pay for. 

Beyond that, your Apple Pencil may not work with your hardware. Check to see if your iPad is compatible.

Why is my Apple Pencil not working: Ask a Genius

If you’ve gone through every point on this list and your Apple Pencil still isn’t working, it’s time to call upon an Apple Genius. Contact Apple tech support – or visit an Apple Store if you’re in proximity – to figure out if your Apple Pencil can be salvaged. 

Both generations of Apple Pencil come with a limited one-year warranty. If you purchased AppleCare+ for iPad, that coverage extends to your Apple Pencil and includes up to two incidents of accidental damage protection every 12 months. 

Hopefully, an Apple Genius will be able to diagnose your Apple Pencil problem so you can get back to sketching or drawing. However, if Apple is unable to repair or replace your Apple Pencil for whatever reason, all is not lost. Check out today’s best cheap Apple Pencil deals so you can save some cash on a replacement.

Read more: 

Alison is a freelance writer and editor from Philadelphia, USA. She's been sharing buying advice and retail news for over a decade. When she isn't hunting for deals, Alison can be found teaching/training in martial arts, fawning over skincare, and indulging in her quarantine-borne hobby: cooking.

Источник: https://www.creativebloq.com/how-to/why-is-my-apple-pencil-not-working

How to Fix Apple Pencil Not Charging

This post sums up several methods to help you fix Apple Pencil not charging problem. Read and check solutions below.

Apple Pencil is a magic wand invented by Apple to help you make use of your iPad Pro in a better way. As Apple says, it is the best tool to reach for when you need pixel-perfect precision. Apple pencil 1st gen not charging can use it to jot down notes, draft a picture, paint a watercolor, sign a lease, or mark up an email. Whatever you need to do, the Apple Pencil is easy to use.

You can go to Apple.com to learn more about how to use Apple Pencil with iPad Pro.

How to Fix Apple Pencil Not Charging

How to Fix Apple Pencil Not Charging

You know that there is no wall charger for Pencil and no USB connector. So you may charge your Apple Pencil with your iPad Pro by plugging it into the Lightning connector on your iPad. However, sometimes you may find your Apple pencil won’t charge on your iPad. So, how to fix it? Here are 4 solutions you can have a try.

How to Fix Apple Pencil Won’t Charge

Solution 1. Check the Settings

1. Navigate to Settings > Bluetooth.

2. Unpair/Delete the pencil’s connectivity.

3. Again insert the Pencil into iPad for new pairing.

4. Wait for the notification and pair the device again.

5. Waiting for 10-15 minutes to charging it.

Solution 2. Restart the iPad

Restarting is the most traditional and simplest way to solve all problems. Well, believe it or not, restarting usually works.

Solution 3. Repair Apple Pencil to iPad

One user said that his Apple Pencil got the same problem because the battery of his Apple Pencil was drained completely. If your Apple Pencil won’t charge was due to the same reason, you can try the following method.

1. Go to Settings > Bluetooth and remove Apple Pencil from the list of paired devices.

2. Plug Apple Pencil to iPad.

3. Wait for the message that asks if you want to pair the two devices.

4. wait for 10 – 15 minutes for the Apple Pencil to charge.

Solution 4. Use Another Method to Charge

If the above methods can’t fix the issue of Apple Pencil not charging on iPad normally, you can use another way of charging Apple Pencil. So, what is it? That is to plug into a USB port with Apple Pencil Charging Adapter and a Lightning to USB cable. Then plug the Lightning cable’s USB connector into a USB port on a computer, AC adapter, battery backup device, nearest capital one bank from here a USB car charger.

You May Like: How to Speed up Your iPad Pro >

Bonus Tip: Best iTunes Alternative for Transferring iPad Data with Ease

In this part, we will recommend an iTunes alternative – AnyTrans. It is an all-in-one iOS data transfer tool dedicates to help iOS users manage and transfer all the types of iPhone, iPad, and iPod data in an easy way. Why we recommend you AnyTrans, there are reasons:

  • It is a professional iOS content transfer tool, which works well on both PC and Mac computer; meanwhile, AnyTrans is compatible with all iPhones, iPads, and iPods.
  • It’s easy-to-use and won’t have the risk of losing data when syncing.
  • It supports transferring all kinds of iOS data without any limits including songs, contacts, apps, ringtones, notes, calendars, photos, reminders, messages, and so on. Whatever you want to transfer, it can make it for you.
  • You can use it to transfer data between computer and iOS device, and even between any two iOS devices.

Here is a screenshot of AnyTrans on a computer. And you can download AnyTrans to transfer your iPad data with ease now >

AnyTrans Overview

AnyTrans Overview

The Bottom Line

That’s all about how to fix Apple Pencil not charging, hope one of the above fixes worked for you. If you have a different method that helps you out, you can share it by leaving a comment, we’d love to hear about that, too. By the way, if you want to transfer your iPad data without an iTunes alternative, you can give it a try on AnyTrans.

Author Avatar
Joy TaylorTwitter ShareFacebook Share

Member of iMobie team as well as an Apple fan, love to help more users solve various types of iOS & Android related issues.

Источник: https://www.imobie.com/support/apple-pencil-not-charging.htm

Get unlimited access to Wirecutter coverage

Why you should trust us

Nick Guy has been using and reviewing iPad styluses for a decade, first using the early Ten One Pogo stylus when working in Apple retail and then covering dozens more as an accessories editor and author of several iterations of this guide.

For previous versions of this guide, we interviewed graphic designer Dan Bransfield, and designer Mike West helped us test styluses. For the more recent updates, we did speed, handwriting, and precision tests. Writer Serenity Caldwell interviewed pixel artist Rich Stevens, cartoonist Danielle Corsetto, and illustrator Mike Thompson, who have decades of collective experience working in print and online, and asked them to personally test our top picks.

Editor’s note: Serenity Caldwell began working for Apple in July 2018. She last tested and reported on iPad styluses for Wirecutter in 2016. Since then, the guide has been updated several times.

Who this is for

An iPad stylus makes it easier to draw, sketch, doodle, write notes, and use devices in cold weather, and it can help some people who have certain mobility issues that might make touchscreen navigation difficult.

iPad compatibility of our recommended styluses

Zagg Pro StylusApple Pencil 1st genApple Pencil 2nd gen
iPad 6YesYesNo
iPad 7YesYesNo
iPad 8YesYesNo
iPad 9YesYesNo
iPad mini 5YesYesNo
iPad mini 6YesNoYes
iPad Air 3NoYesNo
iPad Air 4YesNoYes
9.7″ ProNoYesNo
10.5″ ProNoYesNo
1st-gen 11″ ProYesNoYes
2nd-gen 11″ ProYesNoYes
3rd-gen 11″ ProYesNoYes
1st-gen 12.9″ ProNoYesNo
2nd-gen 12.9″ ProNoYesNo
3rd-gen 12.9″ ProYesNoYes
4th-gen 12.9″ ProYesNoYes
5th-gen 12.9″ ProYesNoYes

The Zagg Pro Stylus is compatible with more iPads than any other smart stylus. The two versions of the Apple Pencil are each compatible with different iPads.

A stylus isn’t for everyone. If you use an iPad largely for browsing the web, watching video, local food products near me playing games, you’re likely better off with standard touch controls. But even if you’re just a casual iPad user, a simple stylus might make sense for you: When it comes to taking notes, using a stylus to write is faster and easier for many people than tapping away at the iPad’s screen, especially with the advanced handwriting features introduced in iPadOS 14. (People who don’t enjoy handwriting have other options, such as a Bluetooth keyboard or an iPad keyboard case). And with the right stylus, digital artists can enjoy an experience closer to that of using a pencil on paper (or painting on canvas) than they would get by using a finger on the tablet’s glass display.

  • Getting Work Done on an iPad

    Getting Work Done on an iPad

    You can do a surprising amount of work on an iPad with the right gear. These are the best accessories for turning your iPad into a mobile work space.

How we picked and tested

An iPad displaying a stylus drawn image of a cat

We’ve researched hundreds of models of styluses over the years, and we have hands-on experience with dozens. There has songs in the key of life amazon little innovation on the budget side of the spectrum, and very few models have been able to compete with Apple’s own Pencil at the high end. Although the Adonit Mark apple pencil 1st gen not charging been our perennial favorite cheap stylus, we wanted to explore other Pencil competitors to see if anything could stand up to what Apple offers, a decision that led us to test the Adonit Note-M, the JamJake Stylus Pen, and the Zagg Pro Stylus, as well as to reevaluate the Logitech Crayon.

We designed our tests to evaluate the five most important characteristics of a great stylus: precision, advanced features, comfort, resistance, and balance.

  • Precision: A stylus should write consistently, without overlapping letters or inconsistent vertical spacing. While you’re drawing, the stylus should ink over the same line precisely and repeatedly, and the line on the screen should closely stick to the stylus’s tip without noticeable lag.
  • Advanced features: More advanced stylus models include features such as palm rejection, tilt support, and pressure sensitivity, which make for a better drawing and writing experience.
  • Comfort: Recommending a single stylus design and grip for everyone is difficult; some people prefer a thicker body, for example, while others want rubberized grips or angled grip surfaces. However, if a stylus cramped a tester’s hand or dug into skin, we dropped that model from consideration, and if we found it impossible to grip a stylus without dragging a hand on the screen or contorting our fingers, we eliminated that contender.
  • Resistance: A good stylus offers the right amount of friction between the nib (drawing end) of the stylus and the iPad’s screen. If the nib is too slick, you don’t have the line control that you might get with a pen on a piece of paper. If it’s too sticky, you might make erroneous marks or get sore hands from gripping the stylus more tightly to drag it across the screen.
  • Balance and weight: A stylus’s weight should be distributed evenly along its body—a stylus with most of its weight at the nib and little at the other end (or vice versa) is uncomfortable to hold and difficult to control. This is especially true for styluses that don’t support palm rejection, which means you have to keep your hand upright over the pen. Weight in general is also important: A stylus that’s too heavy cramps your hand over time, and one that’s too light suffers from the same problems as a slicker pen nib—you don’t have the same control over your lines.

Over the years, we’ve tested styluses with illustration and cartooning experts. Diesel Sweeties creator Rich Stevens has been drawing and illustrating digitally for decades. Girls With Slingshots creator Danielle Corsetto is almost Stevens’s opposite: Though she’s famous for her recently completed webcomic, Corsetto created it largely using ink pens and physical paper, turning to digital tools primarily for cleanup. Illustrator Mike Thompson conducted additional testing. Each panelist spent a few hours drawing in Notes, Paper, Procreate, and GoodNotes. In 2021, we took what we learned from that wealth of experience and applied it to a handful of new styluses to see how they stacked up to previous picks.

Our pick: Zagg Pro Stylus

A Zagg Pro Stylus resting on the back of an iPad

Zagg’s Pro Stylus is the best digital pen for most note-takers, casual iPad artists, or anyone who just likes a stylus for navigating their tablet. It’s as accurate and responsive as Apple’s Pencil, with almost all of the same features save for pressure sensitivity. The design is familiar and practical, and unlike Apple’s stylus, it works no matter what recent-model iPad you’re using. Charging is simple, the battery lasts for a full workday, and there’s a second, non-smart stylus on the other end. The Pro Stylus is not cheap, but at $30 to $60 less than an Apple Pencil, it’s well priced for all that it offers.

A great stylus will never fully replicate the feel of a pen on paper, but it should come close, creating a fine, accurate line that trails the tip as closely as possible with imperceptible lag. That’s what Zagg’s Pro Stylus offers. Across our note-taking and sketching tests, it always drew a line right where we intended, with the digital ink flowing directly from the fine tip, even when we tried to trip it up with fast squiggles up and down the iPad’s screen. We wrote at 10- to 12-point font size without losing detail. The glass iPad screen doesn’t have the same kind of drag and resistance as a piece of paper, but the Zagg stylus felt as good as any other active model we’ve tested. In accuracy, response, and the physical feel on the screen, the Pro Stylus performed just as well as the 2nd-generation Apple Pencil.

Zagg’s stylus works with any iPad that supports the 1st- or 2nd-generation Apple Pencil, so you don’t have to worry about getting the right version to match your tablet.

The Pro Stylus also roslyn savings bank east meadow palm rejection and tilt support, two features we consider essential on a premium stylus. No matter how much of our hands were touching the iPad’s screen while we were writing, it never interfered with the stylus’s performance or caused the line to jump around, which used to be commonplace with non-smart styluses. And with the Pro Stylus’s tilt support, you can use the pen tip’s broad edge to draw a wider line. Note-takers may find this feature particularly useful when highlighting, and artists will find that it comes close to replicating the experience of using a paintbrush or a marker.

The only drawing feature the Pro Stylus lacks is pressure sensitivity. In contrast, Apple’s Pencil draws a darker or heavier line when you press harder. Some other styluses, such as the Adonit Pixel, replicate pressure sensitivity with specific apps, but none offer it system-wide. This omission isn’t a dealbreaker if you’re writing or casually sketching, but if you’re trying to produce more professional-looking art, pressure sensitivity might be important. In that case, we recommend spending more and getting an Apple Pencil.

The top inch or so of the stylus, above the power button and status ring, slides up to reveal a USB-C port.

At just over 6.5 inches long and with a 0.35-inch diameter, the aluminum Pro Stylus feels a lot more like a standard pen, rather than a tech gadget. It’s mostly round, with one flat edge that prevents it from rolling away when you set it down. Magnets along that edge can attach to the side of flat-edged iPads, including the 2018, 2020, and iPad Pro models, the 2020 iPad Air (4th generation), and the 2021 iPad mini (6th generation). This is only for storage, though; your iPad won’t charge your Pro Stylus wirelessly, unlike with the Apple Pencil. Zagg’s stylus weighs just over half an ounce, which makes it a bit heavier than our favorite traditional pen, but we still found it comfortable for extended use.

The Pro Stylus works with any new iPad instantly, without your having to pair it (although if you previously paired an Apple Pencil capital one business checking account login that iPad, you’ll have to unpair that first). All you have to do is press the power button, and the status ring glows blue, showing that the Pro Stylus is ready for use. Once it’s turned on, you can even use the stylus with multiple iPads without having to worry about going through a pairing process each time you want to switch between them.

A Zagg Pro Stylus magnetically attached to the side of an iPad

Zagg took a simple and smart approach to charging with the Pro Stylus, rather than introducing a new solution as Apple has done with each of its Pencil models. The top inch or so of the stylus, above the power button and status ring, slides up to reveal a USB-C port. Zagg includes a short USB-A–to–USB-C cable and says the battery will last for up to eight hours of use per charge. We never ran the battery all the way down, but with even intermittent charging, the Pro Stylus was always ready to go whenever we picked it up. If you have a USB-C–to–USB-C cable, you can plug the Pro Stylus into an iPad Pro, iPad Air, or iPad mini to charge while you’re away from an outlet.

The Pro Stylus is actually two styluses in one: In addition to the active tip, it has a capacitive rubber nub at the “eraser” end. Although that nub is not nearly as accurate for writing or drawing, it’s useful for swiping around and scrolling. Because it doesn’t make a digital connection, you can use it with any touchscreen device, not just iPads, and even if the Pro Stylus’s battery is dead, it still works. We wouldn’t recommend that you buy this stylus if you want something only for navigating (consider our budget pick if that’s what you’re looking for), but the second nub is a nice extra.

Zagg’s stylus works most iPads that support the 1st- or 2nd-generation Apple Pencil, so you don’t have to worry as much about getting the right version to match your tablet. That list covers the following models:

  • 6th-generation iPad
  • 7th-generation iPad
  • 8th-generation iPad
  • 9th-generation iPad
  • 5th-generation iPad mini
  • 6th-generation iPad mini
  • 4th-generation iPad Air
  • 1st-generation 11-inch iPad Pro
  • 2nd-generation 11-inch iPad Pro
  • 3rd-generation 11-inch iPad Pro
  • 3rd-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro
  • 4th-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro
  • 5th-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro

With a list price of $70, the Pro Stylus isn’t cheap, but compared with styluses offering similar features, it’s a good deal. The Apple Pencil costs $30 to $60 more, depending on which model you have to get, and no other smart stylus costs much less than $50.

Zagg warranties the Pro Stylus for one year. In our experience, the company’s service department has been responsive and effective. An extra active what is the capital of wyoming cheyenne tip is included in the box in case you wear the original down over time.

Upgrade pick: Apple Pencil

An Apple <a href=Huntington bank streetsboro hours resting on the back of an iPad" width="1024" height="512" src="https://cdn.thewirecutter.com/wp-content/media/2021/03/ipadstylus-2048px-495.jpg?auto=webp&quality=75&width=1024">

If you’re a professional illustrator, calligrapher, or artist, you should get the Apple Pencil (1st generation or 2nd generation, depending on which iPad you have) over the Zagg Pro Stylus. Apple’s stylus is the same as Zagg’s in most of the important ways, but it’s the only stylus that offers universal pressure sensitivity, a feature that anyone who draws would likely consider necessary.

The 1st-generation Pencil
is compatible with Lightning-port-equipped
iPad models released since 2015:
The 2nd-generation Pencil
works with any iPad that has a USB-C connector
and flat edges, including the following:
6th-generation iPad4th-generation iPad Air
7th-generation iPad1st-generation 11-inch iPad Pro
8th-generation iPad2nd-generation 11-inch iPad Pro
9th-generation iPad
5th-generation iPad mini3rd-generation 11-inch iPad Pro
3rd-generation iPad Air3rd-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro
9.7-inch iPad Pro4th-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro
10.5-inch iPad Pro5th-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro
1st-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro6th-generation iPad mini
2nd-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro

As with many Apple products, the Pencil’s greatest strength is in the company’s hardware-and-software integration. Because Apple makes the Pencil, as well as the iPad, iPadOS, and software kits for developers, the Pencil can take advantage of more features, although the list of unique functions has shrunk over the years. At this point, pressure sensitivity for art and writing is the main advantage. Unlike Bluetooth styluses from other companies, which have pressure sensitivity only in apps that explicitly support each stylus, the Apple Pencil still offers serviceable pressure sensitivity in older or unsupported programs. In the best apps, using a Pencil feels very close to drawing on real paper.

The Apple Pencil is designed with real-world drafting pencils in mind; its length is almost identical to that of an HB art pencil, lack of eraser and all. It’s balanced just as nicely, too, allowing you to hold it wherever it feels natural or comfortable.

The Pencil’s nib is not as resistive or soft as it could be. Plastic nibs are usually slippery against glass and tend to make a tiny “tap-tap-tap” sound, and the one on the Pencil is no different. Most high-end styluses—Wacom pens included—are similar in that respect, and the Pencil’s plastic nib doesn’t dramatically worsen the experience of working with the tool. That said, a Pencil with a rubber- or mesh-coated nib would be nice to see.

The 1st-generation Pencil also has a somewhat odd charging system: The tool has a Lightning-connector plug hidden under a magnetic cap at the “eraser” end, and you plug the Pencil into an iPad’s Lightning-connector port to charge the stylus. (This is also how you pair the Pencil with the iPad in the first place.) The result looks weird, and it seems as if a bump might break the connector off. Soon after the Pencil’s release, blogger Zach Straley discovered (video) that it can stand a surprising amount of abuse—Apple has clearly designed the rear of the tool to absorb force applied to the connector if it’s jostled. If you really want to break your Pencil, you can—but you shouldn’t break your iPad in the process.

As strange as having a stylus sticking out from the bottom of your iPad looks, the convenience factor of being able to add roughly 20% of the Pencil’s battery life in five minutes is great. Other powered styluses require either a separate power brick or a USB cable (and, of course, a USB power source) to charge. You can charge the 1st-gen Pencil anytime, anywhere, without having to remember any other accessories.

The 2nd-generation Pencil charges and pairs through a magnetic connection on the iPad's right side. This arrangement offers a few benefits. It looks a lot less silly and puts nothing in a position to break, the Pencil has somewhere to go when it’s not in use, and the stylus almost always stays charged. You can’t charge the 2nd-gen Pencil any other way than on the iPad, unlike with the 1st-generation Pencil—not that you should ever need to.

The double-tap function is is broccoli good for you advantage of the 2nd-gen Pencil. In supported apps, you can double-tap anywhere on the stylus’s lower third to toggle between settings. By default, including in Apple’s Notes app, that action reliably switches between the drawing implement you’re using and the eraser. App developers can set and offer different settings in their apps, such as zooming.

The biggest strike against the Apple Pencil is its price. When Apple announced the original at $100, it seemed expensive but not exorbitantly so. But the 2nd-generation model launched at $30 more. Yes, the newer model is more advanced, including its magnetic attachment/charging point and touch sensor. But $130 is a huge price to pay for an accessory, especially compared with the Zagg Pro Stylus’s lower price.

On top of that, if you have the original Pencil, there’s bad news: It doesn’t work with the newest iPads. And similarly, the 2nd-generation Pencil doesn’t work with older iPads.

Budget pick: Adonit Mark

An Adonit Mark resting on the back of an iPad

The best cheap stylus for most people and most uses is the Adonit Mark. It feels like a high-quality pen in your hand, with an anodized finish that you can’t help but want to touch. Its weight is evenly distributed across its body, allowing you to hold it close to the nib or near the other end and still have control. The Mark’s mesh nib is thicker, more durable, and smoother to write with than the competition’s. And perhaps best of all, this model is one of the most affordable styluses available. It’s also the best option if you have an older iPad that doesn’t support a smart stylus like the Zagg Pro Stylus or the Apple Pencil.

A tester writing in cursive in the Notes app using the Adonit

Adonit has long been hailed in the iPad stylus universe for great designs that feel good in the hand, and the Mark is no exception. The curved, triangular design brings to mind grade-school pencils or charcoal sticks, with slanted sides that converge into a cone nose that cradles a 6 mm mesh nib. This cone-shaped nose will be welcome to anyone who places their fingers close to the nib when writing or drawing.

The Mark really proved itself during our speed and precision tests. While writing or tracing, you can hold the Mark in just about any position and still retain a good grip and control—and you can easily avoid accidentally rubbing your palm against the screen. This is one of the reasons the results of the Mark’s handwriting tests looked so natural, even at multiple sizes, and why the shape tracings were so accurate.

Even with its great performance, the Mark’s price hasn’t risen above $14 since 2016, and it usually goes for $10. But the Mark doesn’t feel cheap: One of our illustration experts, Rich Stevens, described its build quality as “feeling like you were getting $50 of stylus,” pointing out that by comparison, the $60 Lynktec Apex Fusion “also felt like you were getting $50 of stylus.” If someone had asked us to take a guess as to the Mark’s cost, we would have easily pegged it at double or triple its actual price.

The competition

Logitech’s Crayon has the same features as the Zagg Pro Stylus, supports the same wide range of iPads, and costs about the same. We found its flat body to be less comfortable than the Pro Stylus’s pen-like shape, though, and the Crayon can’t snap onto the side of flat-edged iPads. But it’s an otherwise good alternative if you prefer the design or if it drops significantly in price.

JamJake’s Stylus Pen is the most popular apple pencil 1st gen not charging of a generic smart stylus we’ve seen under a number of different brands. It’s actually surprisingly accurate and responsive, but it has a few major flaws: It doesn’t support tilt or pressure sensitivity, and the flat edge that looks like it magnetically attaches to an iPad doesn’t actually do so. But the power toggle is the dealbreaker—the capacitive power button is located where the eraser would be if this were a pencil, and even a soft tap or brush against it can turn the stylus on or off, which makes it a real pain to use.

Like most of the smart styluses we tested, Adonit’s Note-M doesn’t support pressure sensitivity, but it also lacks tilt support, and it doesn’t support early iPad Pro tablets. The most noteworthy feature is its built-in mouse functionality: Where an eraser would be on a pencil, the Note-M instead has a sensor that you can drag along flat surfaces, left- and right-click buttons, and a scroll-wheel button. The mouse functionality technically works, but it’s not a necessary feature, and it doesn’t work well enough that you should pick this stylus over the Zagg Pro Stylus.

Adonit’s Note+ matches many of the Apple Pencil’s features at a lower price. It supports tilt and palm rejection out of the box, instantly connects, and charges over USB-C, all of which are good things. But we found a higher latency while writing or drawing with this model, its pressure sensitivity isn’t universal throughout iPadOS, and it’s compatible only with a limited selection of iPads.

The Adonit Note provides accurate palm rejection at an affordable price but doesn’t offer the same tilt recognition as our pick.

Adonit’s disc-style styluses, including the Mini 4, Pro 4, and Switch, can work well, but they’re not for everyone. The clear plastic tip gives you the appearance of greater accuracy, but as with thin-nib styluses, that may not always be the case, especially when you’re writing or drawing quickly. Disc nibs also lack the “give” of a soft tip and offer less resistance against the screen than rubber or mesh, and as a result you must position the nib at the proper angle to write or draw correctly.

Adonit’s Pixel was one of the first third-party smart styluses to compete with the Apple Pencil, but it works only with certain apps, and the most recent iPad the company lists support for is the 2017 iPad (5th generation).

The Adonit Snap 2 is a 1.9 mm fine-line stylus with a flat, magnetic body. It’s primarily designed for use with a smartphone, and it even comes with a magnetic adhesive for your phone so that you can store the Snap on the rear of your device. It’s a decent version of a fine-line stylus, but as its primary focus is mobile phones, we elected not to put it through the same tests as our iPad contenders.

The Studio Neat Cosmonaut has a larger body and nib than every other modern stylus we’ve seen. But this bigger size makes it a perfect choice for kids, people who have trouble gripping smaller pens, and anyone who wants the equivalent of a dry-erase marker in their iPad arsenal. With an aluminum body and a rubber coating, it’s a big tool, and although its balance and resistance allow you to do excellent line work, you have to trust in the Cosmonaut’s nib precision—the stylus’s chunky body often blocks your view of the area you’re working on. For zoomed-in illustrations, loose sketching, or big writing, however, the Cosmonaut is a delight to work with.

Meko’s Universal Stylus is popular on Amazon. Available in one- and two-piece bundles, it pairs a mesh tip on how to find my default router number end with a clear disc tip on the other, and it comes with replacements for both. The fiber tip feels slick on the iPad’s glass screen, but it’s quite accurate. Members of the Wirecutter staff were split on whether they preferred that slick feel or the slight drag from Adonit’s Mark, with the latter earning a bit more support. If you don’t like the Mark’s drag, though, the Meko stylus is a good, affordable option.

Longtime tablet leader Wacom has been making rubber and Bluetooth styluses for the iPad for a few years, but 2016 saw the company change to mesh nibs for its standout models, the Bamboo Solo and Bamboo Duo (the latter of which includes a traditional pen nib in addition to a digital stylus tip). Those mesh nibs feel flimsy and have way too much squish when you draw on the screen, and the weight balance of both styluses has changed, too, which left us thoroughly unimpressed.

The Ten One Design’s Pogo Stylus is slightly heavier and better weighted in the hand than the Bamboo Solo, but it still feels too flimsy for writing on iPad-size screens.

The Lynktec Apex Fusion offers a 1.9 mm mesh nib, an auto-off battery, and easy charging via a Micro-USB port on its body. The Apex Fusion is great in apps apple pencil 1st gen not charging Notes, but it suffers from worse lag than basic capacitive styluses do. It also performs poorly in programs that use custom drawing algorithms or that aren’t optimized for powered styluses. Our drawing tests in Paper highlighted this behavior: When we drew or wrote slowly with the Apex Fusion, the app would lose the nib’s location and generate wavy, jagged patterns, whereas with other stylus models the app would produce smooth lines.

We tested a number of Elago’s styluses, each of which has a different body but the same too-squishy rubber tip. This includes the Stylus Grip (our favorite, if we had to pick one, but we still don’t recommend it), Stylus Slim, Stylus Hexa, Stylus Rustic, Stylus Rustic 2, Stylus Allure Stand, and Stylus Ball.

The amPen New Hybrid Stylus is about as basic as a cheap stylus gets. It works, but it’s not special in any way, and you can get something great for just a few dollars more.

Sources

About your guide

Nick Guy

Nick Guy is a senior staff writer covering Apple and accessories at Wirecutter. He has been reviewing iPhones, iPads, and related tech since 2011—and stopped counting after he tested his 1,000th case. It’s impossible for him not to mentally catalog any case he sees. He once had the bright idea to build and burn down a room to test fireproof safes.

Further reading

  • Getting Work Done on an iPad

    Getting Work Done on an iPad

    by Haley Perry

    You can do a surprising amount of work on an iPad with the right gear. These are the best accessories for turning your iPad into a mobile work space.

  • The Best iPad Pro Keyboard Cases

    The Best iPad Pro Keyboard Cases

    by Nick Guy

    With the right keyboard, your iPad can ameris bank online banking app a workable laptop replacement, and we’ve picked some great options built into a protective case.

  • Windows Surface vs. Apple iPad: The Best Pro Tabletshow to find account number on peoples bank alt="The Best iPad Keyboard Cases" src="https://cdn.thewirecutter.com/wp-content/media/2021/01/ipadkeyboardcases-2048px-4878-2x3-1.jpg?auto=webp&quality=60&crop=3:2&width=150" width="150" height="100">

    The Best iPad Keyboard Cases

    by Nick Guy

    With the right keyboard, the iPad provides a reasonable portable computing experience, and we have recommendations for just about every price range.

Источник: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-ipad-stylus/

The most common iPad problems, and how to fix them

Apple’s iPad remains the best tablet on the market. Apple has sold well over 350 million worldwide, and there are currently five different models to choose from. While these tablets are certainly well-engineered pieces of digital machinery, they are not immune to a few snags and glitches. We’ve taken a look at some of the most prevalent iPad problems in an attempt to find workable solutions for them. Sometimes it will take more than a simple reset to get your iPad back in working order.

You may also want to take a look at our suggestions for the best iPad cases, the best fleet and farm mankato mn apps, and the best iPad games.

iPad air sitting on table.

Problem: Universal Control isn’t working with my iPad

You certainly aren’t alone. As we noted, the interesting Universal Control option was to be added with MacOS Monterey, but it hasn’t been added yet. Originally, the feature was intended to allow you to use an iPad or Mac as a second screen and move seamlessly between them with both content and keyboard/mouse controls. If you can’t get it to work, that’s because it’s not here yet, despite it being advertised as a native feature for MacOS Monterey.

Possible solutions:

  1. This feature has not yet been implemented, and Apple appears to be missing its promised deadline for adding Universal Control. There’s nothing to do but wait for the next update.

Problem: There are dead or stuck pixels on the iPad

It can be frustrating if a pixel isn’t working on your iPad. You’ll first notice this as an unresponsive dot on the display that doesn’t change, or stays black no matter what happens. Sometimes there may be more than one pixel like this.

Possible solutions:

  1. If the pixel still lights up but is simply stuck or never goes to the right color, you can try manually fixing it yourself. Wrap your thumb in a clean cloth and apply gentle, firm pressure to the area of the display with the pixel, slowly moving your thumb as you do so. Sometimes this can help fix any issues the panel is experiencing.
  2. Flashing bright, changing colors can also help reset a pixel. You can plenty of Pixel Fix videos on YouTube to run at full screen to help with this, or even find an app that does the same thing.
  3. If the pixel is permanently dark no matter what you do, it’s dead. You cannot fix a dead pixel. If it’s a minor issue and not distracting, you can leave it. But it’s a good idea to take your iPad into an Apple Store and ask about a display replacement.

Problem: The latest iPadOS isn’t installing on my iPad

Eager to get the latest iOS/iPadOS updates and all the new features offered? You may discover that falling for you lyrics peachy iPad is obstinately refusing to download the update, even if it says it will or if it was scheduled to update at a specific time. Fortunately, this is usually due to not meeting specific requirements needed to update, not a permanent flaw on your iPad.

Possible solutions:

  1. Make sure your iPad battery has at least a 50% charge. To be safe, it’s a good idea to just plug your iPad in before you start a big update.
  2. Make sure you are not using a cellular data connection for your internet. The iPad will not start such a big download when on a data connection to avoid using up cell data.
  3. Check that Low Power Mode is turned off. If it’s accidentally enabled, the update probably won’t work.
  4. Disable your VPN if you are using one. While you can whitelist sites on many VPNs, that doesn’t really work for downloading a software update straight from Apple, so disable it for this change, and turn it back on afterward.

Problem: Frozen screen

You may find from time to time that your iPad screen freezes and remains unresponsive to your touch. It’s a common complaint at Apple’s supportforum. The most likely culprit is a specific app, but it’s not always easy to identify which one. If it happens repeatedly, take note of what you have running and try uninstalling it to see if that solves the problem permanently. Whatever the cause, your immediate solutions to a frozen iPad screen are the same.

Possible solutions:

  1. Try restarting your device first by pressing and holding the Power button until you see “slide to power off” on the screen, and then slide to power off. Press and hold the same button to turn it back on. You’ll know it worked when you see the Apple logo.
  2. If the screen isn’t responding, you might need to force restart the device in which case you should press and hold the Power button and the Home button at the same time for around 10 seconds. You’ll know it worked when the Apple logo appears. For newer iPads without the Home button, press and quickly release the Volume Up button, press and quickly release the Volume Down button, and then press and hold the Power button until the device restarts.
  3. If it stubbornly refuses to react to a restart or reset, then you’ll need to try a restore. Plug it into your computer using the cable provided. Load up iTunes on the computer, select your iPad, choose the Summary tab, and hit the Restore iPad button. This will erase your content, so you may prefer to choose Restore Backup on the Summary tab. Bear in mind that you’ll lose anything you haven’t backed up.

Issue: iPad won’t turn on

It’s a nightmare with any electronic device when it refuses to turn on at all. Don’t assume the worst, though, it may prove easy to revive. This is another common post in the Apple support forum.

Possible solutions:

  1. Try holding down the Power button and the Home button together until you see the Apple logo. For newer iPads without the Home button, press and quickly release the Volume Up button, press and quickly release the Volume Down button, and then press and hold the Power button until the device restarts.
  2. Maybe the battery is just empty. Plug the iPad into the wall charger using the original cable and charger that came in the box and wait an hour before trying the first step again.
  3. If your iPad turns on but gets stuck during startup, then plug it into your computer with iTunes running and repeat step one, except this time, don’t let go of the buttons when you see the Apple logo, keep holding them until you see the recovery mode screen. You should get the option to Restore or Update. Choose Update and it will try to reinstall iOS without wiping your data.
  4. If none of this works, then it’s time to contact Apple or drop into an Apple Store if you’re able to.
iPad Pro 12-9 inch feat image.

Glitch: iTunes or Finder doesn’t recognize iPad

Some people have reported issues with plugging the iPad into the computer and booting up iTunes only to find that the iPad isn’t there. If iTunes or Finder isn’t recognizing your iPad then you can try a few things to solve the problem.

Possible solutions:

  1. Check apple pencil 1st gen not charging battery icon on the iPad when you plug it into your computer. If it has a lightning bolt on it to denote charging or it says Not Charging next to it then you know the port and the cable are working and you can move to step 2. If it doesn’t then try another port. If that doesn’t work then try another cable.
  2. (If you are running MacOS Catalina you can skip this step as you’ll be using Finder to interface with your iPad.) Make sure that you have the latest version of iTunes. If it’s on a PC then go to Help and then select Check for Updates. If it’s on a Mac then hit the iTunes tab and select Check for Updates. If you have the latest version or updating makes no difference, try step 3.
  3. Turn the iPad off. Turn the computer off. Turn them both back on again and plug the iPad in.
  4. If you see a Trust this Computer alert, unlock your device and tap Trust.
  5. Still no joy? Take a look at Apple’s support article for further suggestions on how to fix this glitch.

Problem: iPad won’t charge

If you find that your iPad won’t charge up when you plug it into the power adapter, there are a couple of possible reasons. If it doesn’t charge when you plug it into the computer, it may just be the port you are using, try the power adapter instead. You can see whether the USB port on your computer is charging it or not by looking at the battery icon on the iPad. If it is charging, you’ll see the lightning symbol; if not, it will say Not Charging next to it. Some computer ports can’t provide enough juice to charge the iPad, and it will always charge more slowly via the computer, even if it does work.

Possible solutions:

  1. You want to amazon login id if it’s the cable or power adapter itself so, if possible, try the cable and power adapter with another compatible device, or try a different power adapter and cable.
  2. It’s always worth rebooting your iPad to see if that helps.
  3. Some people report success after turning on Airplane mode, so it’s worth a try.
  4. If the cable or power adapter is not the problem and nothing bank of america cd calculator has worked, then there could be a fault with the iPad and you’ll need to contact Apple, contact the retailer where you bought it, go into an Apple Store, or take it to a 3rd party repair shop as the culprit could be a damaged battery, or a damaged charge port, both of which are repairable.

Issue: iPad won’t connect to Wi-Fi

A lot of people have trouble connecting to Wi-Fi networks with their iPads. Before you start serious troubleshooting, you should check Settings > Wi-Fi on the iPad and make sure that it is turned on. It’s also worth making sure that Wi-Fi is accessible on another device.

Possible solutions:

  1. There’s a reason IT departments the world over tell everyone to turn it off and on again as a first troubleshooting step – because it so often works. Try turning off your iPad and router and then turn them both on again and wait a few seconds before trying to reconnect.
  2. Try telling the iPad to forget the network in Settings by tapping the network name and selecting forget. Turn the iPad off and on again and then reconnect to the network and re-enter the details as necessary. You can also try Settings > General > Reset > Reset Network Settings.
  3. Make sure you have the latest iOS software by going to Settings > General > Software Update. You should plug your iPad into the power adapter before updating. Older iPads can be updated via iTunes on the Summary tab via the Check for Update option.
  4. If your iPad still won’t connect then it’s worth checking with your ISP for help or advice. The problem could be related to your specific router. You might want to update the firmware or change the channel.
  5. If nothing so far has worked, then you may consider trying to connect to a different Wi-Fi network with your iPad just to test if it works. If not, then it’s time to contact Apple for further help.

Glitch: iPad is running slow

If you find that your iPad is not its usual zippy self and you are experiencingsomelag when you navigate, you can try a couple of fixes. You may just have too many is broccoli good for you running.

Possible solutions:

  1. Double-tap the Home button and swipe up on each open app or game to close it. If you have a newer iPad without the Home button, then swipe up from the bottom of the Home screen and pause slightly in the middle of the screen to open the recently used apps list.
  2. You could also just reset the iPad by holding down the Power button and the Home button simultaneously for 10 seconds. For newer iPads without the Home button, press and quickly release the Volume Up button, press and quickly apple pencil 1st gen not charging the Volume Down button, and then press and hold the Power button until the device restarts.
  3. You really need at least 2GB of free space for smooth operation, so take a look in Settings > General > iPad Storage and check. You may need to delete some files or uninstall some apps. Some apps take up more and more space over time, so it can even be worth uninstalling and then reinstalling an app to clear it. You may also consider going to Settings > Safari and tapping Clear History and Website Data, then Clear History and Data to clear out your cache, but this will also log you out of websites you’ve signed into.
  4. As apple pencil 1st gen not charging last resort, you might try a factory reset. This will wipe everything though, so make sure you back up first. If you do a factory reset, test the iPad without restoring a backup just to see if it runs any better. If you subsequently restore a backup and it slows down again, then you’ll know the issue is with something in the backup.

Problem: Cellular data connection dropping

Quite a few iPad owners have been complainingabout cellular data connections dropping frequently. Obviously, this will be seriously influenced by how good the coverage is in your area. If you have good coverage on the same network with your phone, but the iPad is struggling, you could try a couple of things. First, check in Settings > General > Cellular and make sure it’s on. You could also try a restart. If it continues to be a problem, go through the steps below.

Possible solutions:

  1. Make sure you have up-to-date carrier settings in Settings > General > About.
  2. Check that you have the latest iOS software by going to Settings > General > Software Update.
  3. Remove the SIM card and then put it back in again.
  4. You can also try Settings > General > Reset > Reset Network Settings.
  5. Some pets at home opening hours sunday have found success by disabling LTE in Settings > Cellular Data > Enable LTE.
  6. If none of that works, a factory reset might be worth trying, just make sure you back up first.
  7. If you’re still having problems, it’s time to contact your carrier’s support or visit an Apple Store for more help.
Lifestyle image of someone using the iPad Mini.

Issue: iPad is randomly crashing

A lot of iPad owners suffer from problems with random crashing where an app spontaneously closes or the iPad suddenly restarts. You might find that this is a bigger issue on older iPads. You can try a few different things to alleviate the problem. It is quite likely to be related to specific apps, so take note of what you were doing when it crashes and see if a pattern emerges over time.

Possible solutions:

  1. Press and hold the Power button and then slide to power off. Press and hold the button to chase sapphire reserve tsa pre check credit it on again. You could also reset by pressing and holding the Power button and the Home button at the same time for 10 seconds. For newer iPads without the Home button, press and quickly release the Volume Up button, press and quickly release the Volume Down button, and then press and hold the Power button until the device restarts. Neither of these solutions is liable to affect a permanent fix.
  2. Connect to Wi-Fi and go to Settings > General > Software Update to ensure that your iPad has the latest software. If there’s an update available then download it and install it.
  3. Open the App Store and tap Updates and then update all of your apps.
  4. If your crashes are occurring in Safari specifically then maybe try going to Settings > Safari and tap Clear History and Website Data, then Clear History and Data. Note that this will log you out of websites that you’re logged into.
  5. If you’re still having problems then try wiping the iPad with a factory reset and restoring it.
  6. If none of the above has worked for you then try contacting Apple. If you’re able to reproduce the crash and you can take it into an Apple Store to show them, then you will be able to get some help.

Possible solutions:

    1. Make sure you have enough free space. Go to Settings > General > iPad Storage and take a look. If you’re running best lead generation companies for realtors of space then you may have to delete something before the new app can find a space.
    2. Tap on the app icon and make sure that the download isn’t paused. If you see the option to Resume Download then tap it. You may also try pausing it and then resuming to see if that gets it going.
    3. Make sure that restrictions aren’t on. Go to Settings > General > Restrictions and make sure that you are allowed to download apps.
    4. Ensure that you have the latest update by going to Settings > General > Software Update and download and install anything available.
    5. Press and hold the Power button and then slide to power off. Press and hold the button to turn it first national bank texas first convenience bank again. You could also reset by pressing and holding the Power button and the Home button at the same time for 10 seconds. For newer iPads without the Home button, press and quickly release the Volume Up button, press and quickly release the Volume Down button, and then press and hold the Power button until the device restarts.
    6. Go to Settings > iTunes & App Store and tap your Apple ID then sign out. Repeat step four. When your iPad restarts go into Settings > iTunes & App Store > Sign In.

Problem: Your iPad battery is charging very slowly

When everything is running as it usually should, your iPad should take about three hours to recharge. If you own an older model, it still would only take about four hours, at a maximum. That said, many users report that it takes much longer for their iPad to recharge fully. We have a couple of tips to try and speed up the charging process.

Possible solutions:

  1. Make sure your iPad is updated. Infamously, iPadOS 13 caused these types of battery charging issues for many users. If it’s an issue with iPadOS, you can’t do much except live with it until Apple improves the software and releases a new version.
  2. Check your ports and connectors. Look for any signs of damage, grime that’s blocking ports, or anything else that may be interrupting the connection. If you aren’t sure, try to find another compatible charging cable and switch it out to see if this makes a difference. Do not use an off-brand cable or charger to charge your iPad! If you are using one, stop right away and switch to a version straight from Apple.
  3. Make sure your iPad isn’t trying to do a lot when you are charging it. Disconnect from Wi-Fi and Bluetooth or put it into Airplane mode first. Don’t use your iPad when it’s charging, and see how much this helps.
  4. Always remember to make sure that your iPad isn’t put in a particularly hot or cold place. This can damage the battery and cause long-term problems that can’t really be fixed without a full replacement.

Problem: The Apple Pencil isn’t working with my iPad

We completely understand how frustrating this issue can be, mainly because you likely bought the Pencil to pair specifically with your iPad. We have several solutions to try out to get the two working together again.

Possible solutions:

  1. Make sure you have the right Apple Pencil and iPad. Compatibility issues do exist. The 1st generation iPad Pencil (aka the one with the silver band that you plug in) is designed to work with earlier iPad Pros, iPad Air 3rd gen, and iPad 6th and 7th gen — see the full list here. The 2nd generation Pencil is made to what is the routing number for renasant bank with the newest iPad Pro 12.9-inch and 11-inch models, which the 1st generation Pencil won’t work with. And if you have an iPad Air 2 or earlier model, the Pencil won’t be able to work with your screen at all, although some third-party stylus models could work for you. We know, it’s confusing. But it’s important to find out what Pencil and iPad model you have to see if they can work together.
  2. Restart your iPad and try again. When you restart, take a look at Settings and Bluetooth to make sure your Bluetooth is turned on. If you already see the Pencil as a recognized device in the Bluetooth settings, then select the information icon, and choose to Forget this Device. Then try reconnecting.
  3. Make sure the Pencil is charged. It’s obvious, but this problem really does happen a lot.

Problem: Your iPad is stuck in bootloops

A bootloop is when your device gets stuck in thank you for being a friend james taylor cycle of turning off and turning back on; The iPad continues repeating that over and over again on a seemingly endless loop. We’ve found that these frustrating cycles tend to result from a bug in whatever app you were last trying to use. That said, there could also be a couple of other factors causing the bootloop. We have several recommendations to try out to stop the looping before you take your iPad to the Apple Store for help.

Possible solutions:

  1. Wait for an update. Unfortunately, bootloops are often caused by bugs in specific apps or the iPad’s current operating system. In that situation, you just need to wait for an app or OS update to be released. A recent example of this happened in June 2020, when a version of iPad iOS caused iPads to bootloop unexpectedly while working, usually around a minute or so after starting up. Apple doesn’t waste a second when it comes to releasing patches for these problems. Just keep an eye out for new updates.
  2. Force a manual restart, or “soft reset,” and see if it doesn’t solve the problem. A manual reset is a powerful troubleshooting tool to have. To start the reboot, hold the Power and Home buttons down for about 10 seconds simultaneously. You don’t have to count it down; you’ll see when the reboot has started because the Apple logo will appear on the screen. Some newer iPads don’t have a Home button. For those devices, press and quickly release the Volume Up button, press and quickly release the Volume Down button, and then press and hold the Power button until the device restarts. If this doesn’t work, you may need to force a factory reset, unfortunately. Before resetting anything, though, may sure you back up all of your important data.
  3. Go into recovery mode. This feature prevents bootloops and opens the door for your iPad to fully update if your device is stuck in an infinite bootloop. Apple has a full guide, but to explain it briefly— connect your iPad to a computer; then press and release the Volume Up button, the Volume Down button, the Top button, and then hold the Top button as your iPad restarts. If this was completed correctly, your iPad would revert to recovery mode. If your device has a Home button, hold the Home and Top buttons simultaneously. Continue holding them down until you see that recovery screen.

Editors' Recommendations

Источник: https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/common-ipad-problems-and-how-to-fix-them/

Apple Pencil on iPad: our full guide on how to use it

 An Apple Pencil is one of the best pieces of kit you can buy for your new iPad, to help you make the most of the slate by allowing you to sketch, doodle, annotate, handwrite, and more.

The original Apple Pencil and the Apple Pencil 2, released in 2015 and 2018 respectively, let you replace your wobbly finger with a slender and accurate stylus, which is vital for many creatives and workers alike.

If you’re considering buying an Apple Pencil, or have one and want to know how to make the most of it, then this guide is for you, as it includes everything you need to know about the Apple Pencil.

Price and availability

You can pick up an Apple Pencil from Apple’s website, and we’d recommend doing so as it’s often the same price there as homes for sale in sanders county montana third-party retailers, but you can get the Apple Pencil 2 engraved there for free.

The original Apple Pencil will cost you $99 / £89 / AU$145, while the Apple Pencil 2 is slightly pricer at $129 / £119 / AU$199. However, the styluses are compatible with different tablets, as we’ll get into, so picking the right Apple Pencil for you isn’t just about choosing the one in your price range.

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2

The choice of which Apple Pencil you should buy is easy: if you have a 2018-model iPad Pro 11 or iPad Pro 12.9, you should check out the Apple Pencil 2, but the original stylus is compatible with older iPad Pro models as well as a range of newer iPads in other ranges. You can see a full compatibility list here.

There are a few major differences between the newer and older Apple Pencils. The Apple Pencil 2 snaps to the side of your iPad magnetically, and charges wirelessly when it’s in position, so it’s very easy to use. Gpa requirements for south carolina state university the other hand, the original Apple Pencil charges when plugged in to the tablet, so it’s far more fiddly to power up.

The Apple Pencil 2 also has a double-tap function, so in certain apps you can quickly press the lower portion of the stylus twice to switch back to the previous tool you were using. This double-tap feature can also be set to show the color palette or activate the eraser.

Apple Pencil 3

There are rumors that Apple is working on an Apple Pencil 3 for its new iPad Pro 2020 models. We’re not totally sure if this is correct, since the Apple Pencil 2 has only so far been compatible with two tablets compared to eight for the original, but it’s certainly possible.

One rumor suggested there could be a touch-sensitive panel on the side of the next stylus, that would let you swipe in directions to access certain tools or, for example, scroll through web pages. The same rumor also posited that there could be a camera on the Apple Pencil 3, though we’re not exactly sure what purpose that would serve.

We’ve also heard the Apple Pencil 3 could have haptic feedback, which means the stylus would vibrate or shake to tell you certain things. It could also detect how hard you’re gripping it, so squeezing it would trigger certain functions.

How to use an Apple Pencil

If you’ve bought an Apple Pencil and want to know how to make the most of it, here are some tips and guides on how to properly work the stylus.

How to connect an Apple Pencil

Compared to some other peripherals like headphones or wearables, an Apple Pencil is super easy to connect to your slate, as your iPad will do most of the work automatically.

First of all, make sure Bluetooth is enabled on your iPad, otherwise the stylus won’t work. To do this, head into the main inb performing arts spokane wa menu, or pull down the Control Center, and turn Bluetooth on if it isn’t on already.

Now, for the original Apple Pencil, remove the cap at the end to reveal the Lightning Connector and plug this into the Lightning Port on apple pencil 1st gen not charging iPad. For the Apple Pencil 2, simply connect the stylus to the magnetic strip on your iPad Pro.

The Apple Pencil 2 will pair automatically, but for the original you need to tap a prompt first. Now you’re all set up.

It’s worth pointing out that with the original Apple Pencil if you turn off the iPad, enter Airplane Mode, or connect the Apple Pencil to a different iPad, you will need to go through this pairing process again.

How to charge an Apple Pencil

Once you’ve paired your Apple Pencil to your iPad you’ll want to charge it, but that’s very easy – simply leave your Apple Pencil plugged in (for the original) or mounted on the magnetic strip (for the Pencil 2) and the stylus will power up.

The original Apple Pencil also comes with an adapter that lets you connect it to your iPad charger if you’d prefer.

Charging is pretty quick, so the Apple Pencil won’t be out of action for long at all. When you connect the stylus, the iPad should inform you as to how much battery is left, so you should know if you just need to power the stylus up for a few minutes or for a longer period of time.

Apple Pencil tips and tricks

If you’re new to the Apple Pencil, or stylus gadgets in general, there are a few things to know that could really help you use the Apple Pencil.

It’s worth knowing for example that you don’t need to press too hard with the stylus onto the screen for inputs to be picked up – in fact, the iPad understands how hard you’re pressing, and many sketching apps and the like will therefore adjust the mark left depending on the amount of pressure. But for general note-taking a light touch is all that’s needed, and will help protect the screen.

If you’ve got the original Apple Pencil, we should warn you that charging it can be precarious – since it needs to stick out from the iPad at a right angle, with just a small Lightning connector sticking in.

We’d therefore recommend placing your iPad down flat on a surface while the stylus charges, to avoid you knocking the Apple Pencil and snapping the connector. Or take the iPad out of the equation and use the supplied adapter for charging.

You should also know that when you’re using the Apple Pencil, it won’t work for all functions on the device. Swiping up from bottom to bring up recent apps, or from the top to bring down the Control Center, for example, will still only work with your finger. This is actually pretty useful, as it will stop you accidentally triggering the wrong function if you draw to the edge of the screen with the stylus.

Best apps for Apple Pencil

If you’ve bought an Apple Pencil and want to know the best apps to use with it, we’ve got a few suggestions beyond the built-in Notes app. The following apps will let you explore its functions fully.

Scriptation

Scriptation is primarily an app that lets you mark up scripts (hence the name), but it’s actually a really useful app for annotating all kinds of files, whether they’re documents to sign or scrutinize, or articles to analyze. There’s a wide range of tools to use, and it’s easy to import and export PDFs too.

Download Scriptation here.

Cardflow

You won’t need sticky notes if you’ve got Cardflow, as it does the same thing but digitally. You can create a wall of plain or colored pads, and scribble all the notes and information you need on them. It’s a super quick and easy way of organizing ideas, made even easier with the Apple Pencil to write and organize with.

Download Cardflow here.

Autodesk SketchBook

It’s always useful to have a great art app, for if you’re feeling creative or just want a vibrant way of taking notes, and Autodesk SketchBook is one of the best. It has got a huge range of art tools, and also has a user interface that feels specially built for Apple Pencil use, with functions in all the right places.

Download Autodesk SketchBook here.

Staff Writer, Phones

Tom's role in the TechRadar team is as a staff writer specializing in phones and tablets, but he also takes on other tech like electric scooters, smartwatches, fitness trackers and more. 

Источник: https://www.techradar.com/how-to/apple-pencil-on-ipad-our-full-guide-on-how-to-use-it

Question:Q:🔋 Apple Pencil Not Charging

Looks like no one’s replied in a while. To start the conversation again, simply ask a new question.

Question:Q:

if the charge of my apple pencil is completely down, can i use the lightning connector dock of my ipad to charge.I tried, but it does not work

​[Re-Titled by Moderator]

null-OTHER

Posted on Apr 3, 2017 4:01 AM

Answer:A:
Answer:A:

Make sure you charge Apple Pencil according to this article Use Apple Pencil with iPad Pro - Apple Support

Posted on Apr 3, 2017 4:14 AM

View answer in context

Aug 12, 2017 10:22 PM in response to hakandent In response to hakandent roslyn savings bank east meadow

I have the exact problem where the pencil won't charge at all showing 3% battery life. I had charged it overnight using an ipad but pencil still will not charging. Strangely when I managed to pair the pencil with the pro with the pencil inserted, the charging status jumps from 3% to 100% within minutes but when you remove the pencil, pairing disconnects. When plugged in again it shows 3% again. Not sure if it is a hardware or software issue but when sent to an Apple Store they too can't figure out and since it was out of warranty had little choice cox login pay bill buy a new pencil. A warning for all users not to leave it uncharged for a long time or else pencil will never charge again.

Aug 12, 2017 10:22 PM

View answer in context

Nov 7, 2017 11:13 PM in response to Ben64smith In response to Ben64smith

Ever since I got my iPad Pro & Pencil I’ve looked & googled but it’s like no one seems to know that rechargeable batteries don’t last forever. Generally rechargeable batteries like in mobile phones last 2 years then start to be able to hold less and less of a charge. No one on these forums will even mention the possibility that the user may be at that point. Even users who went to the store say the apple geniuses couldn’t figure it out & it was out of warranty so it’s a whodunnit mystery! I guess apple is going to adress it the same way the subject was handled with iPods. Class action law suits. Depending where one is from, they are protected by numerous laws.

Years ago due that very same issue, youtuber Casey Neistat & brother, made an HBO doc filming themselves as they finally found out that they bought a product that after 2 years can toronto dominion bank visa card services longer hold a charge & is now useless. It took many contacts before they got the truth. Thats when apple (who says they were already workin on this) worked to create the exchange program where one pays like $100 & sends in the phone or iPod. Last I knew they contracted that service out to another company.

As far as I know, nothing exists for the pencil & youtuber techs who’ve disected it, say it’s made in a way thats nearly impossible to open & replace the battery without damaging it. Ive replaced my iphone battery but I hoped that eventually a solution would come by the time mine no longer holds a charge.

Nov 7, 2017 11:13 PM

View answer in context

Jul 5, 2017 2:31 AM in response to jayramfrommumbai In response to jayramfrommumbai

I had the same problem. The battery of Apple Pencil was drained completely and it was not charging from iPad.

The solution that worked for me is:

1. Go to Settings -> Bluetooth and remove Apple Pencil from the list of paired devices.

2. Plug Apple Pencil to iPad.

3. Wait for the message that asks if you want yo paşr the Pencil and pair two devices.

4. wait for 10 - 15 minutes for the Apple Pencil to charge

Jul 5, 2017 2:31 AM

View answer in context

Sep 19, 2017 1:26 AM in response to Hotklm In response to Hotklm

Same issue. Apple Pencil shows 3% charged. Any solution or is it junk?

Sep 19, 2017 1:26 AM

View answer in context

Sep 11, 2017 10:30 AM in response to Hotklm roslyn savings bank east meadow In response to Hotklm

I have one that is doing exactly the same, does Apple offer out of warranty repairs? And if so what is the cost?

Sep 11, 2017 10:30 AM

View answer in context

Sep 21, 2017 9:39 PM in response to sash1234 In response to sash1234

I decided to try out my pencil for the first time. Got it for Xmas and I can’t get past the 3% charge.

Os11

Sep 21, 2017 9:39 PM

View answer in context

Page content loaded

td ameritrade com ameritrade Jul 5, 2017 2:31 AM in response to jayramfrommumbai In response to jayramfrommumbai

I had the same problem. The battery of Apple Online bank loans for people with bad credit was drained completely and it was not charging from iPad.

The solution that worked for me is:

1. Go to Settings -> Bluetooth and remove Apple Pencil from the list of paired devices.

2. Plug Apple Pencil to iPad.

3. Wait for the message that asks if you want yo paşr the Pencil and pair two devices.

4. wait for 10 - 15 minutes for the Apple Pencil to charge

capital one auto finance payoff Jul 5, 2017 2:31 AM

Aug 12, 2017 10:22 PM in response to hakandent phone number santander customer service In response to hakandent san jose earthquakes game

I have the exact problem where the pencil won't charge at all showing 3% battery life. I had charged it overnight using an ipad but pencil still will not charging. Strangely when I managed to pair the pencil with the pro with the pencil inserted, the charging status jumps from 3% to 100% within minutes but when you remove the pencil, pairing disconnects. When plugged in again it shows 3% again. Not sure if it is a hardware or software issue but when sent to an Apple Store they too can't figure out and since it was out of warranty had little choice but buy a new pencil. A warning for all users not to leave it uncharged for a long time or else pencil will never charge again.

is mint green tea good for you Aug 12, 2017 10:22 PM

phone number santander customer service ode to the west wind imagery Sep 11, 2017 10:30 AM in response to Hotklm In response to Hotklm

I have one that is doing exactly the same, does Apple offer out of warranty repairs? And if so what is the cost?

Sep 11, 2017 10:30 AM

bmo business account online banking Sep 19, 2017 1:26 AM in response to Hotklm In response to Hotklm

Same issue. Apple Pencil shows 3% charged. Any solution or is it junk?

Sep 19, 2017 1:26 AM

Sep 21, 2017 9:39 PM in response to sash1234 In response to sash1234

I decided to try out my pencil for the first time. Got it for Xmas and I can’t get past the 3% charge.

Os11

Sep 21, 2017 9:39 PM

Nov 7, 2017 11:13 PM in response to Ben64smith roslyn savings bank east meadow In response nasb pocket bible zipper Ben64smith

Ever since I got my iPad Pro & Pencil I’ve looked & googled but it’s like no one seems to know that rechargeable batteries don’t last forever. Generally rechargeable batteries like in mobile phones last 2 years then start to be able to hold less and less of a charge. No one on these forums will even mention the possibility that the user may be at that point. Even users who went to the store say the apple geniuses couldn’t figure it out & it was out of warranty so it’s a whodunnit mystery! I guess apple is going to adress it the same way the subject was handled with iPods. Class action law suits. Depending where one is from, they are protected by numerous laws.

Years ago due that very same issue, youtuber Casey Neistat & brother, made an HBO doc filming themselves as they finally found out that they bought a product that after 2 years can no longer hold a charge & is now useless. It took many contacts before they got the truth. Thats when apple (who says they were already workin on this) worked to create the exchange program where one pays like $100 & sends in the phone or iPod. Last I knew they contracted that service out to another company.

As far as I know, nothing exists for the pencil & youtuber techs who’ve disected it, say it’s made in a way thats nearly impossible to open & replace the battery without damaging it. Ive replaced my iphone battery but I hoped that eventually a solution would come by the time mine no longer holds a charge.

bankmobile disbursements login page Nov 7, 2017 11:13 PM sports car club of america

User profile for user: jayramfrommumbai jayramfrommumbai

Question:Q:🔋 Apple Pencil Not Charging

Источник: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/7911159
Charging Apple Pencil Using iPad

Apple offers two different generations of Apple Pencil, which are compatible with different iPads. As both are battery powered, they are inevitably going to run out of juice. Here’s how to charge and check the battery percentage of your Apple Pencil.

How to Charge First-Generation Apple Pencil

Charging the first-generation Apple Pencil is not the most elegant affair. The first-generation Apple Pencil is compatible with all iPads that ship with a physical Home button and a Lightning port.

If you need help identifying which Apple Pencil you own, know that the first-generation accessory is completely circular.

It’s paired and charged in the same fashion. Take your Apple Pencil and remove the cap from the top of the stylus. You’ll now see a Lighting connector at the end of the Apple Pencil.

First generation Apple Pencil plugged in to iPad

Insert this connector into the Lightning port at the bottom of your iPad. You’ll hear a ding and the Apple Pencil will start charging.

Keep the Apple Pencil plugged in; a full charge happens in around 15 to 30 minutes. We will guide you through how to see the battery percentage of an Apple Pencil at the end of the article.

If you don’t like charging your Apple Pencil using your iPad (and it is quite an awkward affair), you can use the Lightning adapter that came in the box with your Apple Pencil.

Charging Apple Pencil Using Lightning Adapter

Connect your Apple Pencil to the adapter, then connect the adapter to a Lightning cable to charge your stylus.

How to Charge Second-Generation Apple Pencil

Apple improved the charging experience with the second-generation Pencil by leaps and bounds. The second-gen Apple Pencil is supported by newer iPad Pros and iPad Air. These iPads have flat edges and don’t have physical Home buttons.

The second-generation Apple Pencil magnetically snaps to the side of the iPad, as it has a single flat edge (along with a programmable button). And that’s all you have to do to pair and charge your Apple Pencil.

Put your Apple Pencil on top hotels near union bank and trust pavilion portsmouth va your iPad (when in landscape), and you’ll see a banner telling you that the accessory is charging. You’ll see the battery percentage as well.

iPad Pro User Charging Their Apple Pencil

As this is the way to store and carry around your Pencil with your iPad, your Apple Pencil will almost never be without charge.

If this does happen, attaching it to the iPad will give you the required charge in just a couple of minutes. You’ll also get a notification when your Apple Pencil is running low on battery.

How to See Your Apple Pencil Battery Percentage

When you use a Pencil with your iPad, Apple automatically adds a Batteries widget to the Today View screen. You can swipe left to right on your iPad’s Home screen to bring up “Today View.” Here, swipe up to find the “Batteries” widget.

You’ll see the battery levels of a connected Apple Pencil right here.

Small Batteries Widget on iPad Today View

If you can’t find the Batteries widget, you can add the widget in just a couple of seconds. Tap and hold an empty part of your Home screen to enter Jiggle Mode.

RELATED:How to Add Widgets to Your iPad's Home Screen on iPadOS 14

Here, tap the “+” button in the top-left corner of the screen.

Tap Plus Button from Home Screen Editing Mode

From the widgets pop-up menu, choose the “Batteries” option.

Select Batteries from Widget List

You’ll see the widget in three sizes. Use the Small or Large size if you want to see the battery percentage and then tap the “Add Widget” button.

Tap Add Widget to Add Battery Widget

The widget will be added to the end of the Today View. You can move it wherever you want on that screen. Swipe up from the Home bar to save the widget layout.

Check Apple Pencil Battery From Widget

You can now see the battery percentage of your Apple Pencil at any time, no matter if it’s charging or not.


One of the best things you can do with the Apple Pencil is to use it to take handwritten notes in the Notes app. Say goodbye to pen and paper, once and for all!

RELATED:How to Take Handwritten Notes on Your iPad Using the Apple Pencil

Источник: https://www.howtogeek.com/694631/how-to-charge-your-apple-pencil/

Posted in 1st

Comments

  1. Rata inna middleast inna ayata mehe idan Fd open karanna puluwan Dubai agent la innawa banks walin sampath Hnb wage Fd tamange namatama danna puluwan Dubai idan poddak e gana video ekak denna

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *